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Atlantic Forest Jaguar

Balam Offline
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Atlantic Forest

No large tropical forest ecosystem has suffered so much loss as Mata Atlântica, also known as the Atlantic Forest. Encompassing a variety of tropical forest habitats—from dry forests to moist forests to coastal mangroves—the Mata Atlântica once stretched up-and-down Brazil's coastline, and covered parts of Paraguay, Uruguay, and Argentina. Today, it survives largely in small degraded patches and protected areas.

Historically, the Mata Atlântica made up over a 1.2 million square kilometers (about a quarter of the size of the Amazon), but after centuries of deforestation for timber, sugar cane, coffee, cattle ranching, and urban sprawl the Mata Atlântica has declined by well over 90 percent: today less than 100,000 square kilometers of the forest remains.

Although nearly adjacent to the Amazon rainforest, the Mata Atlântica has always been isolated from its larger and more famous neighbor. It is, in fact, more ancient than the Amazon. Being cut off from other tropical forests has allowed the Mata Atlântica to evolve unique ecosystems, which harbor a large number of species found no-where else on Earth.

While most of the Mata Atlântica lines the eastern coast of Brazil, the forest complex also extends to three other countries Paraguay, Uruguay, and Argentina.
The Mata Atlântica is present in 13 of Brazil's 26 states, spreading into the interior from fifty to several hundred kilometers and rising as high as 2,000 meters. It spreads far into eastern Paraguay, covers apart of northeastern Argentina, and just touches the Uruguay coast.  Two of the world's largest cities, Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, were both built over the Mata Atlântica. Increased urban and rural sprawl has cut into remaining pockets of forest.

Despite so little forest surviving, the Mata Atlântica remains remarkably rich in biodiversity and endemic species, many of them threatened with extinction.
In terms of flora researchers have cataloged over 23,000 plants, 40 percent of which are endemic to the Mata Atlântica. The area is especially rich in unique tree species—about half of which are endemic. A survey of a single hectare in Bahia found 450 tree species.

Regarding fauna, scientists have recorded 264 mammal species, nearly 1,000 birds, 456 amphibians, over 300 reptiles, and 350 freshwater fish. In all, 31 percent of these are found no-where else. Some taxa have higher endemism than others: for example, 61 percent (282 species) of the Mata Atlântica's amphibians are only found there. Mangabay


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Landscape and Fauna


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Ricardo Toledo


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A. Hartung


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By Rosa Gamboias


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Thelmå Gatuzźo


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Vero Quiroga

The Jaguar in the Atlantic Forest, by De Mello et al.

Jaguars Panthera onca are Critically Endangered (A4 b c d; C2 a i) in the Atlantic Forest because a population reduction of 50-90% was estimated in the past 10-15 years in the largest subpopulations of jaguars at the Upper Paraná and is suspected at the Coastal Atlantic Forest. The causes of reduction have not ceased since there is a continuous decrease in the Extent of Occurrence EOO, Area of Occupancy AOO and habitat quality, plus retaliatory and sport killing. The total number of mature individuals is less than 250 and the number of mature individuals is less than 50 in almost all subpopulations. 

The most serious threats to jaguars in the Atlantic Forest are habitat loss and degradation, loss of prey base and jaguar hunting. Legal protection has been ineffective in stopping Atlantic Forest deforestation and most protected areas have human settlements, causing direct habitat loss, habitat degradation and loss of prey base; other forms of habitat degradation are caused by illegal palm Euterpe edulis harvesters and poachers, as well as through natural and criminal fires that occur throughout the Atlantic Forest. 

Conservation measures most needed are the legal and effective protection of all the remaining large fragments of the Atlantic Forest through new restrictive Conservation Units, restoration of connectivity between the extant protected areas with known jaguar populations, effective protection of the extant Conservation Units in the form of intensive patrolling and an increase in ecological and genetic research to allow population management, which may be a necessity in some areas.

Iguazú National Park, Argentina - Brazil


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Proyecto Yaguarete


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Red Yaguarete

Puerto Peninsula National Park, Argentina


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Red Yaguarete

Urugua-í Provincial Park, Argentina


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Red Yaguarete
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Balam Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-25-2021, 09:24 PM by Balam )

Aratiri male with tapir kill, he's well known for predating on tapir and is one of the largest and most successful males from Iguazu


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By Emilio White
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Balam Offline
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Baqueano from Urugua-í Provincial Park, Argentina


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By Red Yaguarete
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Balam Offline
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Morombi Natural Reserve, Paraguay


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By Reserva Morombi
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Argentinian males from Misiones


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By Proyecto Yaguarete
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Serra do Molar, Brazil
Drastic sexual dimorphism between this pair


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By SPVS
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Balam Offline
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Gausu, from San Jorge Reserve

94 kg male that was unfortunately run over by a car


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By Proyecto Yaguarete
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Balam Offline
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( This post was last modified: 04-11-2021, 10:27 PM by Balam )

Misiones, Argentina
Captive jaguars kept by Sigel Waidelich, a rancher turned conservationists who kept captive individuals to breed in captivity for release into the wild


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He mentions in this documentary how the jaguars he's witnessed around his ranch killing cattle and horses with ease.
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Balam Offline
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Intervales State Park, Brazil


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By Beatriz Beisiegel
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Balam Offline
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Guacurarí male jaguar captured at Iguazu NP, Argentina who was poached a few years after being tracked by biologists:

Guacurarí is an adult male jaguar, weighing 71 kg, which the researchers recorded for several years. In 2006 and 2008 this individual was photographed by camera traps in the Iguazú National Park area, where the Iguazú Falls are located. The investigators indicate that Guacurarí makes large movements within the province of Misiones. In 2009 he was captured by the team of biologists to put the GPS collar on him. After 17 days it was possible to locate him, but his trail was lost for several months. During the latter part of 2010, investigators managed to capture him again, retrieve the necklace, and put a new one on him to continue monitoring him.


Guacurarí became an emblem given that it was the first jaguar monitored in the Selva Misionera. Unfortunately, in January 2012, he was the victim of poachers inside the Urugua-í Provincial Park, in the province of Misiones. Until today there have been no advances in the investigations and there are no identified perpetrators.

Name: Guacurarí † (alt + 0134)
Capture Location: Iguazú National Park
Sex: Male
Age: Adult
Weight: 71 Kg.
Length: 2.05 mts.
Previous Registration: Camera traps

Guacurarí in 2011


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Eduardo Militello

His skull remains


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Balam Offline
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Urugua-í Provincial Park, Pyragüe male


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By Red Yaguareté
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Balam Offline
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#12

Croissant caught by Onças do Iguaçu cameras in 2020


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Proyecto Yaguareté
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