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Asian Wild Water Buffalo (Bubalus arnee)

United States Pckts Online
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#76

(01-10-2019, 07:36 PM)Shadow Wrote:
(01-10-2019, 07:26 PM)Jimmy Wrote:
(01-10-2019, 04:46 PM)Spalea Wrote: @Jimmy :

About #70: I believe this man, on the photo you show, would be unable to do the same thing with a Cape African buffalo, simply because the African buffalo's horns are more curved, shorter but more massive (wider). Thus, the man's hands would be closer to the neck/spinal column axis. Therefore the bovid would have much more strength to throw him... Even if the water buffalo's dimensions can be larger.

The fact that their horns are longer allows the man to hold them further from the neck/spinal column axis. But is this water buffalo, seeming very powerful, domestic or wild ? 


Nevertheless water buffalos are very impressive animals !

This theory reminded about my science class at school which I had never thought of, kind of like force farther from fulcrum will be more efficient at cracking nut kind of thing you are talking about lol. However this buffalo is tamed, if it was a wild one mere human force is absolutely no match he could never manipulate the head of that beast by controlling horns absolutely not, buffalo lifts another buffalo on the tips of one horn so humans are no comparison, naturally short horned animal should generate more force for tossing eg bison. However this analogy is somewhat one sided as there are also other bio mechanics like muscle mass to withstand the strain of extra weight of horns, types of muscles, flexibility to consider, as we have seen from prehistory there were pelorovis and longhorned bison that had the biggest horns and it worked for them. So again cape buffalo would have certainly thrown the puny human in the air, as does water buffalo if it did not want to oblige.





Here we come also to that one thing, what can´t be forgotten. Humans know weak spots of these animals. With some animals that doesn´t help if not with a gun. But with some animals that knowledge does help, if there is someone in good physical condition, knowing exactly what doing, then one can have possibility to force certain animals to ground at least for a moment. Long horns mean after all good leverage if able to grab and then make swift and determined move just in right time and right direction. This can be seen in rodeo performances and in many shows.

So it is not about pure strength but learned skills. Same thing can be seen when predators like lions and tigers hunt big prey. Of course they are weaker than big prey animals, they just are strong enough with needed skills and "weapons". Then again it is one thing to be able to take down some bull from horns, another thing is to keep it there and/or do it again when bull is really mad and paying attention.... Wink

There is a 0 % chance of a human being able to subdue a Buffalo giving it's all, he would get tossed like a ragdoll.
Here in the states, Cows kill an average of 22 people a year, more than Sharks!
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Finland Shadow Online
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#77

(01-10-2019, 11:36 PM)Pckts Wrote:
(01-10-2019, 07:36 PM)Shadow Wrote:
(01-10-2019, 07:26 PM)Jimmy Wrote:
(01-10-2019, 04:46 PM)Spalea Wrote: @Jimmy :

About #70: I believe this man, on the photo you show, would be unable to do the same thing with a Cape African buffalo, simply because the African buffalo's horns are more curved, shorter but more massive (wider). Thus, the man's hands would be closer to the neck/spinal column axis. Therefore the bovid would have much more strength to throw him... Even if the water buffalo's dimensions can be larger.

The fact that their horns are longer allows the man to hold them further from the neck/spinal column axis. But is this water buffalo, seeming very powerful, domestic or wild ? 


Nevertheless water buffalos are very impressive animals !

This theory reminded about my science class at school which I had never thought of, kind of like force farther from fulcrum will be more efficient at cracking nut kind of thing you are talking about lol. However this buffalo is tamed, if it was a wild one mere human force is absolutely no match he could never manipulate the head of that beast by controlling horns absolutely not, buffalo lifts another buffalo on the tips of one horn so humans are no comparison, naturally short horned animal should generate more force for tossing eg bison. However this analogy is somewhat one sided as there are also other bio mechanics like muscle mass to withstand the strain of extra weight of horns, types of muscles, flexibility to consider, as we have seen from prehistory there were pelorovis and longhorned bison that had the biggest horns and it worked for them. So again cape buffalo would have certainly thrown the puny human in the air, as does water buffalo if it did not want to oblige.





Here we come also to that one thing, what can´t be forgotten. Humans know weak spots of these animals. With some animals that doesn´t help if not with a gun. But with some animals that knowledge does help, if there is someone in good physical condition, knowing exactly what doing, then one can have possibility to force certain animals to ground at least for a moment. Long horns mean after all good leverage if able to grab and then make swift and determined move just in right time and right direction. This can be seen in rodeo performances and in many shows.

So it is not about pure strength but learned skills. Same thing can be seen when predators like lions and tigers hunt big prey. Of course they are weaker than big prey animals, they just are strong enough with needed skills and "weapons". Then again it is one thing to be able to take down some bull from horns, another thing is to keep it there and/or do it again when bull is really mad and paying attention.... Wink

There is a 0 % chance of a human being able to subdue a Buffalo giving it's all, he would get tossed like a ragdoll.
Here in the states, Cows kill an average of 22 people a year, more than Sharks!

As I wrote, with some animals knowing weak spots doesn´t help without a gun Wink
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Finland Shadow Online
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#78
( This post was last modified: 01-10-2019, 11:57 PM by Shadow )

(01-10-2019, 11:38 PM)Shadow Wrote:
(01-10-2019, 11:36 PM)Pckts Wrote:
(01-10-2019, 07:36 PM)Shadow Wrote:
(01-10-2019, 07:26 PM)Jimmy Wrote:
(01-10-2019, 04:46 PM)Spalea Wrote: @Jimmy :

About #70: I believe this man, on the photo you show, would be unable to do the same thing with a Cape African buffalo, simply because the African buffalo's horns are more curved, shorter but more massive (wider). Thus, the man's hands would be closer to the neck/spinal column axis. Therefore the bovid would have much more strength to throw him... Even if the water buffalo's dimensions can be larger.

The fact that their horns are longer allows the man to hold them further from the neck/spinal column axis. But is this water buffalo, seeming very powerful, domestic or wild ? 


Nevertheless water buffalos are very impressive animals !

This theory reminded about my science class at school which I had never thought of, kind of like force farther from fulcrum will be more efficient at cracking nut kind of thing you are talking about lol. However this buffalo is tamed, if it was a wild one mere human force is absolutely no match he could never manipulate the head of that beast by controlling horns absolutely not, buffalo lifts another buffalo on the tips of one horn so humans are no comparison, naturally short horned animal should generate more force for tossing eg bison. However this analogy is somewhat one sided as there are also other bio mechanics like muscle mass to withstand the strain of extra weight of horns, types of muscles, flexibility to consider, as we have seen from prehistory there were pelorovis and longhorned bison that had the biggest horns and it worked for them. So again cape buffalo would have certainly thrown the puny human in the air, as does water buffalo if it did not want to oblige.





Here we come also to that one thing, what can´t be forgotten. Humans know weak spots of these animals. With some animals that doesn´t help if not with a gun. But with some animals that knowledge does help, if there is someone in good physical condition, knowing exactly what doing, then one can have possibility to force certain animals to ground at least for a moment. Long horns mean after all good leverage if able to grab and then make swift and determined move just in right time and right direction. This can be seen in rodeo performances and in many shows.

So it is not about pure strength but learned skills. Same thing can be seen when predators like lions and tigers hunt big prey. Of course they are weaker than big prey animals, they just are strong enough with needed skills and "weapons". Then again it is one thing to be able to take down some bull from horns, another thing is to keep it there and/or do it again when bull is really mad and paying attention.... Wink

There is a 0 % chance of a human being able to subdue a Buffalo giving it's all, he would get tossed like a ragdoll.
Here in the states, Cows kill an average of 22 people a year, more than Sharks!

As I wrote, with some animals knowing weak spots doesn´t help without a gun Wink

But there is difference between able to bring down some animal to ground quickly if able to surprise it totally.... and then keeping it there :) Or surviving after that, when for instance buffalo rises up fully irritated :Grin wouldn´t try my luck and I think, that not also men, who do that in some show number running away immediately after performance.
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#79

@Jimmy : you're quite right ! Sorry I take it all back, there is no chance to imagine a lone man mastering a such powerful beast, even domesticated... Your movies are very impressive ! I was misused by the photo you posted... My "physic" explanations were ridiculous.
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United States Pckts Online
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#80

Bulls sparring 



"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Nepal Jimmy Online
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#81
( This post was last modified: 01-12-2019, 08:51 AM by Jimmy )

3 calves of wild water buffaloes in Chitwan, born in August- September and doing well till now, currently there are 9 translocated adults of breeding age kept in a large boma. They are bringing more buffaloes this year. Large herd is vital for safeguarding against tiger once they are released. Pics from Chitwan

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author
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Nepal Jimmy Online
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#82
( This post was last modified: 01-13-2019, 08:31 AM by Jimmy )

From Koshi Tappu wildlife reserve, eastern Nepal
By "beyond borders wildlife adventures, Nepal"

*This image is copyright of its original author

By Tashi r. Ghale

*This image is copyright of its original author

By Ramesh Koirala

*This image is copyright of its original author

Herd on a sandbank, ekantipur news

*This image is copyright of its original author

A mature bull by Chungba Sherpa

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author
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Nepal Jimmy Online
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#83

At kaziranga, bull buffalo with a rhino

*This image is copyright of its original author

Buffalo with elephant

*This image is copyright of its original author

A cow with long horns, kaziranga

*This image is copyright of its original author

Buffalo and rhino bathing together

*This image is copyright of its original author

Big bull from  Manas reserve, india

*This image is copyright of its original author
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Nepal Jimmy Online
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#84

Some pics from Koshi Tappu reserve, Eastern Terai, Nepal
By Niru Magar

*This image is copyright of its original author

By Sanjan Thapa

*This image is copyright of its original author

By John Keighley

*This image is copyright of its original author

By gorakhapatra news

*This image is copyright of its original author
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