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Ape Strength

United States Polar Offline
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#1

Chimpanzees, orangutans, and gorillas have been known to exert great strength, particularly in the fields of pulling, horizontal pushing, deadlifting, gripping, and tearing motions.

Do any of you have any accounts/proven feats of strength (best sources from scientific articles) for any of these apes?

I have seen many anecdotes of their strength, but I am not sure if I can trust those anecdotes. Isn't there a video of an orangutan pulling some sumo wrestlers in a tug-o-war? 
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India brotherbear Offline
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#2

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbo3jjs4AW0 
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QfDxg0pJAX4
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India brotherbear Offline
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#3

It was told on the news this morning that Harambe had been seen crushing a coconut in one hand.  Useless
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United States Polar Offline
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#4

How did he crush it? By smashing it with his fist or squeezing it with his hands? (The latter would be quite impressive as further insight into the gripping strength of apes would be provided.)
"Be the reason someone smiles. Be the reason someone feels loved and believes in the goodness in people."

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United States Polar Offline
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#5
( This post was last modified: 06-08-2016, 03:38 AM by Polar )

Wow, and with a simple tug, the female oranguatan easily pulled the man down without a single facial expression or struggle.

Instead of an orangutan half of the wrestler's weight, how about one at only 100 pounds, or less than 1/3 of the wrestler's weight?

It'll be much harder for the 100-pound one but still manageable.

But the orangutan used a lever-like system (standing on a horizontal platform whilst bending her upper body to pull the weight, that makes it impossible for even a few sumo wrestlers to begin dragging her.)

Now if both were standing and the orangutans, both the 180-pound one shown and my speculative 100-pound one, went against him, they would most likely be pulled away unless they could somehow do a sudden and sharp tug back at the man.
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India brotherbear Offline
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(06-08-2016, 03:25 AM)Polar Wrote: How did he crush it? By smashing it with his fist or squeezing it with his hands? (The latter would be quite impressive as further insight into the gripping strength of apes would be provided.)

I believe it is obvious that the gorilla crushed the coconut by squeezing it in his big hand, otherwise it would have been written that he smashed the coconut. -IMO.
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United States Polar Offline
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#7

Karate chimp. So funny!   Laughing




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United States Polar Offline
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#8

Although there is no studies done on a gorilla's strength, and no conceivable evidence exists of their strength, how much do you think a gorilla can pull horizontally? How many men do you think fit the strength of a gorilla?

IMO, a gorilla might pull a ton, and its strength range can probably be between 10-15 men? Olympic weightlifters and powerlifters can be quite stronger than a gorilla at certain motions (overhead press, bench press, cleans/snatches...), yet I feel a gorilla will significantly out-pull and definitely out-grip any human with extreme ease.
"Be the reason someone smiles. Be the reason someone feels loved and believes in the goodness in people."

- Roy T. Bennett
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United States Polar Offline
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#9

Well, there is a new study on one measure of strength difference in chimpanzees and humans which proved that, by looking at just the MHC (myosin heavy chain) protein compositon, chimpanzees are anywhere from 1.35 to 1.5 times stronger than humans pound-for-pound.

Who Would Win a Human-vs.-Chimp Wrestling Match?

"However, human skeletal muscles differ in fiber length and protein composition, the study found. Chimp muscles contain a balanced mixed of three variants of a protein called MHC: I, IIa and IId. But human muscles are dominated by the MHC I variant. This variant enables slower twitching, or contracting, which is important for endurance and energy conservation.

The researchers' computer simulations revealed that these differences in muscle characteristics increase the maximum dynamic force and power-producing capacity of chimpanzees by a factor of 1.35 compared to humans."


For those who want more info on what MHC is about:

Myosin
"Be the reason someone smiles. Be the reason someone feels loved and believes in the goodness in people."

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United States Polar Offline
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#10

However, although the study mentione that chimpanzees had higher fast-twitch fiber percentages than humans, it didn't state that it took the fiber differences or the other molecular muscular differences into account, so the difference could be greater.
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