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Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Printable Version

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RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Balam - 06-19-2021

@Lycaon

The ranch responsible for this massacre has been identified and the police will take the required actions to bring them to justice. This update was shared by the local org Onças do Rio Negro last night:


*This image is copyright of its original author

Because so many important institutions were involved in this incident there was a lot of pressure by the authorities to find out as soon as possible who the perpetrators were.

On a different point and to clarify the weight of the second male, last night I contacted Pedro Neto from Reprocon to get to the bottom of it and he said this to me:


*This image is copyright of its original author

"(The second male was) Estimated as his size was superior to Sandro. Sandro weighed 125kg without being able to lift completely off the ground"

Much like Joker, Sandro's full weight was likely not recorded as he couldn't be lifted entirely from the ground. He did have a decent amount of stomach content so I understand why the team decided to set his official weight as 130 kg.


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Dark Jaguar - 06-20-2021

68 kg adult Pantanal female from Passo do Lontra



reprocon

''Scientific capture for the purposes of the Reprocon biobank at Passo do Lontra.

Female, 68kg, 11 years old (estimated). Not pregnant (ultrasound).''


*This image is copyright of its original author







RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Dark Jaguar - 06-22-2021

From: MANUAL OF IDENTIFICATION, PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF PREDATION BY CARNIVORES

''The jaguar tracks are large, rounded in shape and the overall length is usually a little less than the width. The toes are round, the pads large and rounded in shape (Figures 9a, 9b, 9c, and 9d).''

Figure 9a - Jaguar tracks on wet mud.

photo: Fernanda Michalski

*This image is copyright of its original author




Figure 9b - Jaguar tracks on sand.

photo: Sandra Cavalcanti

*This image is copyright of its original author




Figure 9c - Paw of a jaguar.

photo: Sandra Cavalcanti

*This image is copyright of its original author




Figure 9d - Paw of jaguar.

photo: Sandra Cavalcanti

*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Balam - 06-23-2021

Information on weight and measurements from unhealthy jaguars from Venezuela (Llanos and other ecoregions), from: NOTAS SOBRE LAS ENFERMEDADES DEL JAGUAR Y DROGAS UTILIZADAS EN SU CAPTURA CON FINES CIENTÍFICOS by Ernesto O. Boade & Rafael Hoogesteijn (1991). Direct translaton from the paper:

Although it is very rare to find jaguars that are sick or in poor physical condition, these felines are susceptible to contracting various types of diseases common to the whole group of felines, such as rabies, feline panleukopenia, toxoplasmosis, feline leukemia, etc. They also harbor external parasites such as ticks (genus Amblyomma), bushworms (Dermatobia hominis) and fly larvae in wounds and scratches (produced by Cochliomya hominivorax), the Trichophyto fungus; and large number of species of internal parasites. Seymour (1989), and Patton et al. (1986), report other authors and their own research, the protozoa Hammondia pardalis, Isospora sp., Toxoplasma-type organisms and the T. Evans Trypanosome; the lung fluke parasite Paragonimus sp. \ tapeworms Diphyllobothrium, Echinococcu, oligarthru, Spirometra sp. (prob. S. mansanoides), Taenia macrocystis, Toxascaris, Toxocara cati and T. mystax. The acantocephalus Oncicola oncicola; the hookworms or intestinal worms Ancylostoma tubaeforme and A. pleuridentatum, Strongylida probably A. brasiliensis and Aelurostrongylus sp .; the spirurid nematode Phisaloptera anomala and the parasite Capillaria sp .. In addition, various types of tumors have been reported in captivity, as well as anthrax, smallpox virus and diabetes.

The role of these diseases and/or parasites in jaguar populations is unknown in terms of the degree to which they act as agents of mortality. The same habits of the jaguar would decrease the possibility that their populations will be greatly reduced by diseases or parasitic loads. Among these life habits are the low population density in very large areas, where they generally live alone and in continuous movement, not consuming prey in an advanced state of decomposition and frequently changing their den or dwelling, which reduces the degree of infection. from one cat to another. However, Rabinowitz (1986b) suggests that the high parasite load is one of the several factors that contribute to the fact that the jaguar does not reach advanced ages in the wild, in contrast to those that it reaches in zoos (up to 23 years). This author determined by bone examination of 30 jaguars (13 livestock predators and 17 normal), that only two were over 11 years of age.

There are three periods in your life when you are most vulnerable:

1. Shortly after birth, by competing with his or her littermates to suckle and survive.
2. Shortly after his independence or separation from his mother, when still inexperienced, he begins hunting for himself.
3. When he reaches an advanced age with consequent dental wear and joint problems. Being a top carnivore, it has an existence that we could call "high risk", being continuously exposed to blows, bruises, broken fangs, etc., in the continuous stalking of its prey.

A large number of hunters interviewed by us in Venezuela reported very few cases of sick jaguars. Among these, an old female with worn teeth hunted in June 1983, in the Buenero herd, Manapire river. near Cabruta, Guarico State. She had an abundant profusion of hydatid cysts (larval form of the carnivorous parasite Echinococcus sp.), Well encysted on the posterior aspect of the liver. This hydatidosis was probably acquired by this female, when she preyed on a flock of sheep, brought to this herd, in the middle of the previous year. The sheep is the reservoir of this disease of carnivores and man, in which it is very dangerous. The sheep were eliminated by this feline, during the rainy season. Jaguars do not normally exist in this herd, as they only occasionally climb, when the gallery forests bordering the Orinoco coasts are flooded, towards the highest gallery forests of its tributaries. Despite the condition, this female was in good physical condition.

A very old and emaciated male was hunted by A. Guzmán (pers. Comm.), Being the only one with poor physical conditions, among approximately one hundred hunted specimens, in the La Vergareña herd, Bolívar. Its skinny, large body showed a large number of scratches and wounds, probably caused by other jaguars, infested with flyworms (Cochliomya hominivorax) and also its skin showed a large number of nodules of bushworms (Dermatobia hominis). Despite his condition and worn teeth, he killed a cow in the well of a morichal, although later he could not climb it up the ravine of the well, devouring it semi-submerged. Two jaguars hunted in the Hato Los Araguaneyes, Cojedes State (one in July 1984 and the other in August 1988), which due to their cranial characteristics showed to be animals over ten years old, despite being large, they were emaciated and underweight, one with a total length of 225 cm (157 cm body and 68 cm tail) and only 80 kg of weight, and the other specimen with 148 cm of body length (with only 50 cm of tail, since it was "chucuto", or with a tail bitten by caribs) and only 78 kg. of weight. The skull of the latter was shown to be at least 12 years old.
 
We have also found small and elongated abscesses on the lower part of the front legs of two jaguars, probably caused by the stingers of the river stingray (Potamotrygon sp.). P. Pereira (com. Pers.), Reported to us having recovered several spikes from the tail of the rays, embedded in the legs of some of the jaguars that he skinned.

Neither Crawshaw and Quigley (1984), nor Schaller and Crawshaw (1980), found in their respective studies, jaguars killed by natural causes, with the exception of a single case of a jaguar killed in combat with a bull (a species introduced by man), after countless consultations with hunters and inhabitants of the Pantanal. The first named study reviews the high and localized mortality of adult jaguars, caused by hunting directly promoted by farmers and ranchers. For example, in the herd of the study, 68 jaguars and 275 pumas were hunted between 1959 and 1966. All the specimens captured in these studies showed excellent health, with the exception of one lean female due to being breastfeeding, so these authors conclude that diseases in jaguars are very infrequent, and have not been a significant factor in their decline. According to this evidence, we could conclude that parasitic diseases and/or conditions do not, apparently, represent for the jaguar, any serious limitation for its population growth. The only serious and true limitation is human activity, directly through hunting or indirectly through loss of habitat and prey.

In the case of small remnant populations isolated by man-made habitat losses; Parasitic diseases and conditions can be a strong factor in population decline. This is the case with the only remaining mountain lion population in the eastern United States. This subspecies called "Florida Panther" (Felis concolor coryi), only survives in a small area of southern Florida, and has a small number of individuals with high levels of consanguinity, they present high levels of antibodies against feline panleukopenia, heavy infestations parasitic diseases caused by Ancylostoma pleuridentatum and unusually high numbers of abnormal sperm. In this case, due to the drastic changes introduced by man to the environment, the population of pumas was isolated and progressively reduced, increasing their consanguinity and losing their vitality and resistance to the environment. In this case, hunting was not an important factor of population limitation. The US government is currently conducting a multidisciplinary research program and implemented a recovery plan to try to reverse this process (Belden, 1986; Roelke et al., 1984).

Regarding the capture and tranquilization of the jaguar, the tranquilizing drug that had been used the most in primates and felines, due to its high concentration (which allows the use of small darts with a capacity of 1 to 5 ml) and its effectiveness, was the Phencyclidine (commercially known as Sernylan, Lab. Parke-Davis), used in an average dose of 1 mg. per kg. body weight (LW), with variations from 1.0 to 1.8 mg / kgPV (Ebedes, 1973; Seal et al., 1970; Harthoorn, 1955). Although Phencyclidine had certain side effects in some cases, such as seizures, excessive salivation, muscle spasticity, and hyperthermia, these were controllable with the administration of atropine and a short-acting barbiturate. Currently its achievement is very difficult, since it produces hallucinogenic effects, even orally, so in the slang of drug addiction it was known as "angel dust", this caused its withdrawal from the veterinary medicine market.

Phencyclidine was replaced by a derivative of Ketamine (Vetalar, Ketalar, etc.), well-tolerated and with a wide safety margin. It also has the great advantage that it has few complications due to its much shorter recovery time. Its disadvantage is in its low concentration. Commercially available preparations with concentrations of 10 to 100 mg/ml. Buying the drug in powder, it can be mixed to concentrations of 200 to 250 mg/ml, requiring between 10 to 12 mg/kgPV, to achieve its calming effect in a large feline, so darts of 5 to 10 ml of ability. This implies that rifle or pistol-actuated shots to shoot tranquilizer darts must be fired at short distances. The dart firing rifle activated by a 22 caliber primer is too strong and can cause serious injuries since the dart can go through the cat's skin or even with a poorly fired shot, go through its belly from one side to the other. It is more convenient to use rifles or dart guns, actuated by compressed air.
Ketamine can also be combined with other drugs such as Xylazine (Rompún, Lab. Bayer), with better effects. This combination was used by Crawshaw and Quigley (1984), in six captures of jaguars. Ketamine concentration was 200 mg / ml. This mixture was used at a dose of 11.8 mg/kg of BW, Ketamine and 1 mg/kg BW of Rompún. This implies, for an 80 kg adult jaguar, the use of 3.8 ml of Ketamine and 4 ml of Rompún, in an 8 or 10 ml dart. In two other captures, these researchers replaced Rompún with Valium at a dose of 0.2 to 0.3 mg/kg.

The jaguars captured by Rabinowitz and Nottingham (1986), and Rabinowitz (1986a), were tranquilized with Ketamine, using it in the feline at a concentration of 22 mg/kg BW, prolonging the short effect of Ketamine and reducing muscle tension. with Valium (2 cc) on some occasions. To calm a jaguar perched in a tree with dogs with two darts, he used at the same time a 1m blowgun with the dart gun (powered by compressed air), attached to one end of the blowpipe, and an air-operated rifle. compressed. The other jaguars studied by this author were captured by means of a barred trap, in which the administration of the drug dart by means of the pistol was less complicated.
Another drug used with success by Sunquist (1981), in his study of the Asian tiger in 15 captures and by Crawshaw and Quigley (1984), in 5 captures of jaguar, was the compound of Lab. Parke-Davis CI 744, later called Tylazol, at a concentration of 200 mg/ml. The first of the named authors, had a single loss in 15 captures, a tigress died from a combination of high ambient temperature, hyperthermia from anesthesia and poor physical condition. The necropsy showed fracture of the carpal and metacarpal bones and a gangrenous area on one thigh. The
 
Second named authors did not have any losses and used a mean dose of 3.9 mg/kg BW. This leads to using for an 80 kg jaguar, 1.56 ml of Tylazol, in a 2 ml dart. In the total of 11 jaguar captures made by Crawshaw and Quigley, with the aforementioned drugs, they did not have any losses. Schaller and Crawshaw (1980) also used CI744 (Tylazol) in a female perched with dogs, at a total dose of 200 mg. The female turned out to be 60.5 kg in weight, that is, the concentration used was 3.3 mg/kg BW. The other female (with an estimated weight of 70-75 kg) captured in a trap was also tranquilized with 200 mg of Tylazol. Both animals recovered their activity at 75 and 60 minutes respectively.

In the jaguar, the most used capture system is chasing with dogs, especially in the case of young males and females, who climb trees more easily. Once the cat is perched, it is relatively still and the dart can be safely administered. Adult males generally fight dogs on the ground, in areas of very tangled and thorny vegetation, where the administration of the dart is very unsafe and dangerous. Crawshaw and Quigley (1984), had to desist from two attempts to capture adult males, due to this situation.

Once the feline is perched, avoid noises, screams or sudden movements and keep as far as possible out of the feline's vision, until proceeding to shoot the tranquilizer drug. If you want to avoid fractures or bruises when the feline falls to the ground, it must be tied up on top of the tree and lowered with ropes, or a net must be placed to cushion its fall. After capture, the feline should receive a long-acting antibiotic to avoid infection in the wound produced by the dart. This wound should be healed with a larvicidal healing ointment or spray. The eyes should be protected with an ophthalmic ointment to prevent drying out and protected with a clean dark cloth to avoid damage to the retina. The calmed feline should be kept in a shady place and bathe with water if its temperature is very high.
Another system used in the capture of the jaguar is that of traps or cages made with bars, baited with live prey such as pigs, sheep, goats, dogs or domestic birds, placed in a compartment of the same cage. The bars should be separated by spaces no greater than 5 cm, or internally covered in wood, so that the feline does not burst its fangs against the bars and then is rendered useless for a normal hunt or dies from the infection that it may acquire from the root of the tusk. The live bait trap system was already referred to by Schomburgk (1841), who observed it in Guyana in 1840, for the capture of jaguars and pumas that predate livestock. Cabrera Sifontes (1985), refers to its use in Zulia, as did Velutini (1978), whose group used dead prey (a white-tail deer), setting the trap on a path regularly used by a jaguar.

In February 1984, on the banks of the Tinaco River, in the Corocito herd, near El Baúl, Cojedes, a barred trap was set, baited with a goat in another compartment. A few days later, an old male jaguar, known as a cattle predator in the region, was captured, weighing 84 kg after going two days without eating or drinking water. It was reassured and transported to the Las Delicias zoo in Maracay by the second author. The jaguar spent several days around the trap, before going to try to attack the bait. The tranquilization was carried out with a combination of Ketamine (Ketaset of 100 mg/ml) at a dose of 3 mg/kg BW and Xylazine (Rompún of 100 mg/ml), at a dose of 0.6 mg/kg BW, in a 3 ml dart with 2.5 ml of Ketaset and 0.5 ml of Rompún. The animal was reassured for about 15 minutes, enough time to remove it from the trap, weigh it, check it, medicate it and place it in the transport cage. After calming down, he was injected with Atropine (dose of 0.02 mg/kg BW, 0.5 mg/ml solution) and treated with a combination of long-acting Penicillins and a prednisolone-based anti-inflammatory, to avoid the effects from the stress of capture and transport and to prevent any possible infection, due to the fracture of the four canines and the wounds on the face caused by the bars of the trap.

Another jaguar caught in the same trap was shot dead by a local rancher, so the trap was removed from the scene. Later it was placed in the Casablanca farm, very close to Boca de Aroa, Falcón. This area and its surroundings currently have a great tourist and agricultural development. Practically the entire forest area in the flat part and large portions of the foothills have been deforested and planted with pastures and crops, which, together with the decrease in wildlife populations due to the large number of people who hunt and circulate in the area, have originated the appearance of jaguars that prey on the entire spectrum of available domestic prey: goats, sheep, calves, pigs, chickens, dogs, etc.

On June 25, 1987, an old female was captured. She fell into the trap baited with a dog. It is highly probable that she was the same one who 3 years ago killed four tiger dogs. The reassurance and transport operation was carried out by the first two authors and staff from the Las Delicias zoo. Ketamine (Ketaset 100 mg / ml) 11 mg / kg, total 6 cc total and, Xylazine (North American Rompún 100 mg / ml) 1.9 mg / kg, total 1 cc were used. In addition, Atropine Sulfate (0.54 mg/ml) at a dose of 0.05 mg/kg, total 5 ml subcutaneous (SC) and antibiotics and corticosteroids were also applied and the eyes were protected with ophthalmic ointment. The useful time of anesthesia was about 30 minutes, during which time it was removed from the trap, weighed (53 kg), it was measured and the scrapes and wounds that were made on the skin were healed. The tusks were preserved intact, except for one broken prior to capture. This fairly old female (about 10 years old) with sparse fur, and orange and rather worn teeth, she recovered and got used to captivity well. This female cannot be released elsewhere as she is a confirmed predator.

2 months later and in an area close to the previous one we captured a beautiful 69 kg adult male. The trap was also baited with a dog, near a swamp or "swamp" of about 700 ha. where this jaguar captured chigüires, released there some years ago. This male, although it is not known if he was a confirmed predator, scared away the herds of cattle in the adjacent pastures, causing stampedes and fence damage, so probably like the previous female, he was going to be wiped out sooner or later. It is curious that the first night the trap was set, the jaguar dragged it between the trees for about 5 meters, knocking down branches around it, but without entering it, the next day it was fixed again and if it entered and fell. 

The reassurance and transportation was carried out by the Méd. Vet. E. O. Boede, Almira and R. Hoogesteijn, and César Silli (student). Ketamine (Ketaset 100 mg/ml) was used at a dose of 7 mg / kg, total 5 cc and Xylazine (Rompún 23.32 mg/ml) at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg, total 1.5 cc and 1.5 cc of Atropine Sulfate were applied. In addition, in this male we also used Valium (5 mg/cc) injecting a total dose of 10 mg, that is, 2 cc. The useful anesthesia time was a little less, 20 minutes and the animal was not totally still, but we were able to manipulate it Y. transport it to a private collection in Maracay. With this specimen it is desired to try a translocation since it is not a confirmed predator. Later he was transferred to the El Frío herd, Apure.

On 8-10-87 another female was captured, barley with the same dog, a veteran of the 3 captures. In this case, we arranged for the trap not to be moved from the site but to give the jaguar water and meat right there. The animal was transferred by the second author, on 10-13-87 in very good condition and only presented a small fracture in one tusk. The tranquilization was also carried out with a mixture of Ketamine (Ketaset, 100 mg/ml), 7 ml (dose approx. 12 mg/kg LW) and Xylazine (Rompún 23.32 mg/ml) were applied to apply 2.5 ml (dose approx. 1 mg/kg BW) and both administered intramuscularly by dart propelled by an air gun. After the animal began to lose its reflexes, 5 ml SC of Atropine Sulfate (0.5 mg/ml, dose of 0.04 mg/kg PV) were applied. The useful time of tranquility was 45 to 60 minutes and the feline fully recovered within 3 hours of the administration of the drugs.

Rabinowitz (1986b), used the same system of traps, but baited with live pigs in a compartment of the trap, capturing 4 adult males by this system. Several of the jaguars and pumas that inhabited the study area, ignored the trap and one of the captured males died as a result of an infection acquired by the root of the tusk broken against the bars, several months after its capture. At first this author worked with a strong wooden cage. It didn't work because the first jaguar to fall completely blew it out, putting so much pressure against the boards that it straightened the ends of several 5-inch nails. Another old male who fell into the iron-barred trap pulled all the bars of the trap until by trial and error, he found the closing gate to slide upward and escaped, though he ate the tail protruding between the bars first. to the pig that was as bait in the second compartment.

Interesting to notice that many runts in weights from large populations like the Llanos or Pantanal could be infected with parasites and/or emaciated. This leads me to believe that the two males captured at Hato Pinero who weighed an average of 84 kg were not in good condition either. At Hato la Aurora where jaguars live in perfect conditions, their weights could be potentially much higher. Aurora female weighing 70 kg as a 2-year-old sub-adult is proof of this.


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - LoveAnimals - 06-26-2021

@Balam @Dark Jaguar

I wonder how long and wide the largest Jaguar skull was in cm?


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Pckts - 06-26-2021

(06-26-2021, 05:18 PM)LoveAnimals Wrote: @Balam @Dark Jaguar

I wonder how long and wide the largest Jaguar skull was in cm?

Almeidas longest skull was 32.38cm but there are skulls even longer than that, unfortunately they only give a total score and not just the length.

The largest skulls score a bit over 21” or 53cm or more.


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - epaiva - 06-27-2021

(06-26-2021, 05:18 PM)LoveAnimals Wrote: @Balam @Dark Jaguar

I wonder how long and wide the largest Jaguar skull was in cm?

Largest skull from Venezuelan Llanos measures 31,25 cm long and 22,50 wide, it has a total of 53,75 points.
It was hunted by Paul Stempel in 1945.
All Jaguar skulls 30 centimeters long or longer are considered a huge ones

*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Balam - 06-27-2021

@LoveAnimals epaiva and Pckts already answered it perfectly. I'm going to try and see if I can get the measurements on Sandro's skull, he was a 130 kg 4 year old male and the widest skull from the Pantanal belongs to a male of 106 kg which matched the width of the Venezuelan Llanos skull of roughly 223 mm, that particular Llanos specimen weighed 114 kg. Sandro being heavier could potentially have yielded larger dimensions, the other 140 kg estimated male seemed to have its skull fractured so I don't know if we will be able to get the correct measurements for that particular jaguar.


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Dark Jaguar - 06-29-2021

Carol female from Passo do Lontra - Pantanal

The capture showed on TV here.



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Carol was already captured in 2019 so this is her second capture and they only found out when she was sedated. (she is not the same Carol female from Rio Negro).


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Moment when Carol fell on the snaretrap.

GIF

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Gediendson sedating Carol as she Charges against them.

GIF

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Carol is over 10 years old and said to be approximately 70 kg by the reporter (not sure if they really weighed her but her other datas were all collected)


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Carlão Csemark mentioned they already captured many females in Passo do Lontra unlike in other areas of Pantanal where on the riverside they usually capture more males. Passo do Lontra got a certain balance between males and females.


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She was not collared as the focus of Reprocon's research is to capture males for semen collection.


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Dizzy Carol waking up and returning to where she belongs.


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RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - tigerluver - 07-10-2021

(05-09-2021, 06:10 PM)Pckts Wrote:
(05-09-2021, 09:36 AM)tigerluver Wrote:
*This image is copyright of its original author


What is the source of this excerpt?

Almeida

Is the reference Jaguar Hunting in the Mato Grass & Bolivia (1997)?


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Pckts - 07-10-2021

(07-10-2021, 09:54 PM)tigerluver Wrote:
(05-09-2021, 06:10 PM)Pckts Wrote:
(05-09-2021, 09:36 AM)tigerluver Wrote:
*This image is copyright of its original author


What is the source of this excerpt?

Almeida

Is the reference Jaguar Hunting in the Mato Grass & Bolivia (1997)?

Correct, all cats were taken up until 1989 and book was published in 1990


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - LoveAnimals - 07-18-2021

@Dark Jaguar @Balam @Pckts 

Hello guys, I just found this sample for male Pantanal Jaguars with an average of 114.20 kg and I wanted to ask you if it gives us a valid average or if it is outdated.

*This image is copyright of its original author


What I noticed is that it excludes all the 70–75 speciments I saw in the chart that gave an average of 108 kgs. My question is, were these males removed because unhealthy?


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Dark Jaguar - 07-18-2021

@LoveAnimals

That version of the table is already outdated, it was from last year when Me and @Balam were in the proccess of gathering many datas.

About the 70 kg range males not included its because back then @Balam and I haven't came across the 70 kg's males yet.



Lets remember that this table is an ongoing table that could be added new specimens at any time as soon as we here find new specimens regardless of low/high weights, we are also up to exclude specimens if necessary or needed.

As example I recall those specimens in the outdated version of the table you showed above in the yellow area sourced by Furtado, they were in yellow because back then we didn't know which region of Pantanal they were captured but then we found out they are from the south Pantanal region captured in the areas of Fazenda Barranco Alto (Aquidauana) and Fazenda Caiman (Miranda), Now as the table is updated those individuals are all added in the Blue area of the table (South Pantanal).

Again regardless of sizes we got the aim of gathering the best information so that's why we have the open minds to change it by adding or excluding specimens (in case new infos, datas or even corrections emerges) at anytime with no problems and not make the table as a Conclusive Untouched table. It can go through new updates or changes and for those interested in using this data these people gotta be aware of it and keep an eye on possible future updates. Also the biologists and experts we've shown this table to and who somehow contributed for the addition of new specimens added were informed that we got the aim to be always updating it to make it better and better not only for the Pantanal population table but on the other tables as well.




Anyways taking advantage of the moment as Pantanal and Porto Primavera are not the only areas to produce large jaguars in Brazil here's the updated table of another population of jaguars in Brazil that also produce large specimens other than Porto Primavera and Pantanal. The Cerrado Jaguars who not only overlap in size and dimensions with Pantanal and Porto Primavera specimens but we got a specimen from Cerrado I recently collected the measurements datas of (Xangô male) in this comparison although being lighter and shorter cat in length as in jaguars usually are, His circumference measures decently overlaps with some Siberian Tigresses and Lionesses as well. So don't sleep on the Cerrado jaguars.

Table of Cerrado Male Jaguars, sample of 13 specimens and average of around 97 kg.


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More details on the Cerrado table and a few Cerrado specimens included in it as well as specimens from Amazon and Pantanal sourced by the same study of Mariana Malzoni Furtado, Check post #500 and 501# HERE.



And Again, just like the Pantanal table in case of new infos or new specimens from the Cerrado biome captured are found we can update it at anytime in order to make it better and better.

As an example we know about a Cerrado male jaguar captured in the Cerrado area of PNE (Parque Nacional das Emas), his name is Rogério but we didn't add him in the table because we don't know how much he weighed.


Rogério Cerrado male Jaguar when captured last year (images bellow), its a shame we don't know his size. But if it is to guess he looks to be an average sized Cerrado male jaguar, When captured he looked smaller than Richard and Tiago.

Rogério Cerrado male.


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Its a shame part of PNE area in the Cerrado is currently on fires, hopefully it will sucessfully recover.


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - LoveAnimals - 07-18-2021

(07-18-2021, 09:27 PM)Dark Jaguar Wrote: Lets remember that this table is an ongoing table that could be added new specimens at any time as soon as we here find new specimens regardless of low/high weights, we are also up to exclude specimens if necessary or needed.
So current average is 108 kg right?


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Dark Jaguar - 07-18-2021

On the CURRENTLY sample, the average for pantanal male is 107.7 kg, about 10 kg heavier than the average Cerrado male jaguar.

The sample number of specimen of Pantanal males is Currently at 68 individuals, but as I said, in case of updates like changes, removal or additions of new specimens captured that sample number shall change as well as the average, so keeping an eye on the sample number of the updated table is important.