WildFact
Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Printable Version

+- WildFact (https://wildfact.com/forum)
+-- Forum: Information Section (https://wildfact.com/forum/forum-information-section)
+--- Forum: Terrestrial Wild Animals (https://wildfact.com/forum/forum-terrestrial-wild-animals)
+---- Forum: Wild Cats (https://wildfact.com/forum/forum-wild-cats)
+----- Forum: Jaguar (https://wildfact.com/forum/forum-jaguar)
+----- Thread: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars (/topic-modern-weights-and-measurements-of-jaguars)

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Dark Jaguar - 09-25-2020

(09-25-2020, 06:57 AM)Balam Wrote: @Dark Jaguar looking back at it, the people from the Jaguar ID never mentioned Aju to be larger, nor did Ailton or any other tracker. The only jaguars they have emphasized to me to be larger from the area are Edno, Balam, Tusk and Pheonix, so I'm only keeping high expectations for those when it comes to the jaguars we have a clear ID on. I'm also starting to think some areas of southern Pantanal are producing larger jaguars.

by the way Aju is the one pckts saw and he said he is very big now imagine seeing the likes of Colombiano,Edno,Balam or The misterious massive male I compared with Adriano, the south pantanal like have already been proven a while ago they north/central/south jaguars are all the same just with a bit of different prey resources from one to another and in south section there are many large jaguars no surprise, now who will produce the larger one is something I am not that much interested to know, what interests me the most is getting those sizes overall in all areas no matter what hehe.

and It could happen, I mean Edno and Balam chances of being captured are higher now than any other moment because the rescuers won't let such specimens and the other animals, nature overall go into the ashes by the fire.

If it depends on Gendiendson, Jorge... to save them, they will definitely capture as many animals as they can.


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Balam - 09-25-2020

@Dark Jaguar

I still want to see more from this male from Fazenda San Francisco I posted a day ago

 

He looks colosal to me and even the people who captured the video commented on his size.

Finally I still think this other male from Aguape can surprise us as well, and I'm using the calf's size to compare to him.


*This image is copyright of its original author

Both are from southern Pantanal, so I'm starting to see a trend with large males in this protected ranches turned into conservation areas.


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Dark Jaguar - 09-25-2020

(09-25-2020, 07:17 AM)Balam Wrote: @Dark Jaguar

I still want to see more from this male from Fazenda San Francisco I posted a day ago

 

He looks colosal to me and even the people who captured the video commented on his size.

Finally I still think this other male from Aguape can surprise us as well, and I'm using the calf's size to compare to him.


*This image is copyright of its original author

Both are from southern Pantanal, so I'm starting to see a trend with large males in this protected ranches turned into conservation areas.


The project who used to study and captured a few jaguars in the Fazenda San Francisco in the 2000's was the ''Projeto Gadonça'', but I am not sure they're active nowadays.

and in this areas we had the brothers Grandão and Oreia.


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Pckts - 09-25-2020

(09-25-2020, 06:37 AM)Dark Jaguar Wrote:
(09-25-2020, 06:25 AM)Balam Wrote:
(09-24-2020, 08:38 PM)Balam Wrote: 110 kg male from Porto Jofre


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

The Reprocon team is there at the moment so hopefully they'll capture more jaguars. It'd be a dream if they can capture Edno, Aju, Balam and Pheonix.

Jaguar #61 btw.

Gediendson just confirmed this jaguar to be Aju, so we have his weight!


*This image is copyright of its original author

So Aju happens to be smaller than Ruxu and not in the same size class as we initially thought.

I expected Aju to be larger than just 110 kg, and at least by that photo he doesn't look in bad conditions ( in terms of size ) like Ousado and many other jaguars rescued, he was probably rescued before the fires started doing major damages to him.

Are you positive this is Aju?
I'd confirm with Paul Donahue


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Dark Jaguar - 09-25-2020

(09-25-2020, 04:24 PM)Pckts Wrote:
(09-25-2020, 06:37 AM)Dark Jaguar Wrote:
(09-25-2020, 06:25 AM)Balam Wrote:
(09-24-2020, 08:38 PM)Balam Wrote: 110 kg male from Porto Jofre


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

The Reprocon team is there at the moment so hopefully they'll capture more jaguars. It'd be a dream if they can capture Edno, Aju, Balam and Pheonix.

Jaguar #61 btw.

Gediendson just confirmed this jaguar to be Aju, so we have his weight!


*This image is copyright of its original author

So Aju happens to be smaller than Ruxu and not in the same size class as we initially thought.

I expected Aju to be larger than just 110 kg, and at least by that photo he doesn't look in bad conditions ( in terms of size ) like Ousado and many other jaguars rescued, he was probably rescued before the fires started doing major damages to him.

Are you positive this is Aju?
I'd confirm with Paul Donahue

Yes. that's him.


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Pckts - 09-25-2020

(09-25-2020, 04:43 PM)Dark Jaguar Wrote:
(09-25-2020, 04:24 PM)Pckts Wrote:
(09-25-2020, 06:37 AM)Dark Jaguar Wrote:
(09-25-2020, 06:25 AM)Balam Wrote:
(09-24-2020, 08:38 PM)Balam Wrote: 110 kg male from Porto Jofre


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

The Reprocon team is there at the moment so hopefully they'll capture more jaguars. It'd be a dream if they can capture Edno, Aju, Balam and Pheonix.

Jaguar #61 btw.

Gediendson just confirmed this jaguar to be Aju, so we have his weight!


*This image is copyright of its original author

So Aju happens to be smaller than Ruxu and not in the same size class as we initially thought.

I expected Aju to be larger than just 110 kg, and at least by that photo he doesn't look in bad conditions ( in terms of size ) like Ousado and many other jaguars rescued, he was probably rescued before the fires started doing major damages to him.

Are you positive this is Aju?
I'd confirm with Paul Donahue

Yes. that's him.
Who confirmed it was him?


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Dark Jaguar - 09-25-2020

(09-25-2020, 05:36 PM)Pckts Wrote:
(09-25-2020, 04:43 PM)Dark Jaguar Wrote:
(09-25-2020, 04:24 PM)Pckts Wrote:
(09-25-2020, 06:37 AM)Dark Jaguar Wrote:
(09-25-2020, 06:25 AM)Balam Wrote:
(09-24-2020, 08:38 PM)Balam Wrote: 110 kg male from Porto Jofre


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

The Reprocon team is there at the moment so hopefully they'll capture more jaguars. It'd be a dream if they can capture Edno, Aju, Balam and Pheonix.

Jaguar #61 btw.

Gediendson just confirmed this jaguar to be Aju, so we have his weight!


*This image is copyright of its original author

So Aju happens to be smaller than Ruxu and not in the same size class as we initially thought.

I expected Aju to be larger than just 110 kg, and at least by that photo he doesn't look in bad conditions ( in terms of size ) like Ousado and many other jaguars rescued, he was probably rescued before the fires started doing major damages to him.

Are you positive this is Aju?
I'd confirm with Paul Donahue

Yes. that's him.
Who confirmed it was him?


His forelimbs and neck pattern matches exactly like Aju's and also Check Balam's post right above mine, she said Gendiendson also confirmed it was him.


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Balam - 09-25-2020

The post is right here, Gediendson confirmed it's Aju




RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Pckts - 09-25-2020

(09-25-2020, 05:44 PM)Balam Wrote: The post is right here, Gediendson confirmed it's Aju


I've seen the post but I don't see where its confirmed to be Aju. I'd be curious who told Gediendson that it was Aju as those names are given by the ID project usually when the cat is first spotted.

Also, which images are you using for comparison?
The image shown has most of his neck, body and limbs covered.


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Balam - 09-25-2020

@Pckts in the post he says this jaguar is named Aju, if you look closely to the videos of the capture you will see that his body does resemble that of Aju.

I think what's nice about knowing that he "only" weights 110 kg is that you saw him in person and even you said he wasn't too far away from the size of the lionesses and tigresses you've seen irl as well. So like Dark Jaguar said it gives you an idea of the dimensions that very large males like Edno or Ghost would have. These cats are pretty big.


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Dark Jaguar - 09-25-2020

@Pckts


Look closely to what you can see from the capture pic bellow and compare those spots and patterns WITHOUT MISSING ONE to the pic of Aju side by side, Becareful towards the curves of the body it might trick you, when you spend a few moments looking into detail at what you can see in both pics, you'll soon notice its him.

Those jaguars up north are known to the guys who captures them as well. for example Jorge knows Balam, Edno...


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Pckts - 09-25-2020

(09-25-2020, 06:04 PM)Balam Wrote: Scroll to the last slide to see the video of Gediendson next to Aju, he is big despite not weighing 130+ kg as initially thought


A side note, Aju was sighted after the fires in late August and not said to be in bad health, sad to see he got injured.


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Pckts - 09-25-2020

(09-25-2020, 06:10 PM)Dark Jaguar Wrote: @Pckts


Look closely to what you can see from the capture pic bellow and compare those spots and patterns WITHOUT MISSING ONE to the pic of Aju side by side, Becareful towards the curves of the body it might trick you, when you spend a few moments looking into detail at what you can see in both pics, you'll soon notice its him.

Those jaguars up north are known to the guys who captures them as well. for example Jorge knows Balam, Edno...


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

right forelimb is all you can really match but looks good.


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Dark Jaguar - 09-25-2020

(09-25-2020, 06:15 PM)Pckts Wrote:
(09-25-2020, 06:10 PM)Dark Jaguar Wrote: @Pckts


Look closely to what you can see from the capture pic bellow and compare those spots and patterns WITHOUT MISSING ONE to the pic of Aju side by side, Becareful towards the curves of the body it might trick you, when you spend a few moments looking into detail at what you can see in both pics, you'll soon notice its him.

Those jaguars up north are known to the guys who captures them as well. for example Jorge knows Balam, Edno...


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

right forelimb is all you can really match but looks good.

The neck is matchable to me, thats why I said becareful with the curves, that area you can take the top of the tiger stripe of both pics and link them, also the tiny little spots bellow the tiger stripe matches too, that is the moment you gotta look really careful in details.


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Jaguars - Pckts - 09-26-2020

I joined SCI and now have access to their Record Books.

I'll post records of each Big Cats species I can find.

*Date Taken, Location, With which Hunting Program, gun used, Skull Score*

South American Jaguar Top 16 (Only 16 Available)

1. 03/1970 Paraguay, Chaco Finita R 20 12/16" 
2. 06/1971 Brazil, Pantanal Unknown R 20 6/16" 
3. 01/1983 Brazil, Mato Grosso R. Mason / Tony de Almeida R 20 1/16"
4. 08/1986 Brazil, Pantanal Tony de Almeida R 19 13/16"
5. 09/1978 Brazil, Pantanal R 19 10/16" 
6. 04/1985 Brazil, Pantanal Tony de Almeida R 19 6/16" 
7. 08/1979 Paraguay, Nueva Asuncion R 18 14/16" 
8. 01/1968 Brazil, Mato Grosso Alberto Machado R 18 3/16" 
9. 06/1969 Colombia R 17 11/16"
10. 05/1969 Brazil, Mato Grosso R 17 10/16"
11. 05/1968 Colombia R 17 7/16" 
12. 01/1970 Brazil, Rio Zingu James Donnely R 17 4/16"
13. 08/1971 Brazil, Mato Grosso Tony de Almeida R 17 4/16" 
14. 01/1952 Brazil, Amazon Marlin Perkins / Perkins & Allen Exp. R 17 3/16"
15. 08/1971 Brazil, Mato Grosso Tony de Almeida R 17 1/16"
16. 05/1965 Paraguay Rocky R 16 4/16" 

DESCRIPTION (male) South American jaguars are 7-8-1/2 feet in length (2.1-2.6 m), including 18-29 inches (46-74 cm) of tail, stand 27-30 inches (68-76 cm) at the shoulder and weigh 200-230 pounds (91-104 kg), with some individuals considerably larger. Females are approximately 25 percent smaller than males. The largest jaguars are found near the equator, their size diminishing to the north and south. This is the opposite of many other mammals, which tend to decrease in size toward the equator.

The South American jaguar is the largest cat in the Western Hemisphere, much larger than the jaguar of North America or the cougars from either continent. The largest jaguars of all-heavily built, deep-bodied, with massive forequarters-are found in the Mato Grosso region of Brazil and adjacent parts of Bolivia. The coat is yellow to reddish-yellow with black spots that form square-shaped rosettes on head, neck and legs. The underparts are white or light buff with large black blotches. The tail is relatively short, the head is large and broad and the large yellow eyes are placed well forward.

BEHAVIOR Solitary and territorial, the male is a wanderer with a home range twice the size of a female's and overlapping those of several females. There is no fixed breeding season. The female probably mates every 2-3 years, bearing a litter of 1-4 kittens that remain with her for about two years. Life expectancy 15 years, although captives have lived as long as 22 years.

Entirely carnivorous, it preys mostly on capybara, deer and peccaries, also on sloths, tapirs, fish, caimans and snakes. Often kills domestic livestock, which has made it unpopular with ranchers and has led to its persecution. A good tree climber and an excellent swimmer; unlike most cats, it is fond of water. May be diurnal or nocturnal, depending on the presence of humans. Eyesight and hearing are excellent, sense of smell reasonably good. As a "great" cat, the jaguar is able to roar, but its usual vocalization is a series of deep, raspy, coughing grunts.

HABITAT Forests, preferably dense and especially near rivers or swamps. Also in open country if prey animals are plentiful.

DISTRIBUTION Throughout South America in suitable habitat, except for the extreme south, but primarily in Venezuela, Brazil and Bolivia.

Outside South America, it is found in Central America and Mexico.

REMARKS The South American jaguar is a magnificent animal, the "king of the rain forest," and one of the very top hunting trophies of the Americas or of the world. Any adult male is a fine trophy, but securing one can be difficult. There are several methods. One is by calling, especially at night from a blind or machan. Another is by baiting; after a bait has been hit one can either sit by it at night or follow the jaguar's trail with a pack of dogs. The last can be wet, miserable work during the rainy season, with the dogs swimming much of the time and the hunters following as best they can on foot or horseback, or even by dugout, until the final chase, when all participants are likely to be in the water. Smaller males and most females tend to tree when the dogs get close, but bigger males are likely to stand and fight the dogs on the ground, which can be an unforgettable experience for all concerned. A properly conducted jaguar hunt can be one of the world's great adventures.

TAXONOMIC NOTES Eight subspecies of jaguar are listed, three in South America and five in North America. South American subspecies are: onca (Amazon jaguar), from the Amazon and Orinoco river basins; peruviana (Peruvian jaguar), from Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia; and palustris (Parana jaguar), from southern Brazil and Argentina. We do not separate them.

STATUS In parts of South America, jaguars are plentiful and detrimental to livestock and may lawfully be hunted. Nonetheless, all jaguars are listed as endangered by the USF&WS (1972) and are on Appendix I of CITES (1975).





North American Jaguars
1. 01/1993 Mexico, Ocosingo Rudolfo Santillan R 19 8/16" 
2. 03/1965 Mexico, Sinaloa Hugo Castellanos R 18 9/16" 
3. 01/1950 Mexico, Sonora R 17 10/16"
4. 08/1981 Costa Rica, Guanacaste Floriberto Alfaro R 17 6/16" 
5. 03/1987 Mexico, Yucatan Pen. Julio de Coso R 17 4/16" 
6. 04/1981 Mexico, Puerta Vallarta Alvaro Zuno Arce R 17 2/16" 
7. 02/1965 Mexico, Nayarit Heriberto Parra Paerg R 16 10/16"
8. 08/1987 Mexico, Campeche Ignacio Padilla R 16 9/16" 
9. 02/1965 Belize Curtis Prock R 16 8/16" 
10. 03/1974 Mexico, Campeche R 16 8/16"
11. 06/1979 Mexico, El Tepehuaje Tony Rivera R 16 7/16" 
12. 03/1987 Mexico, Campeche Julio de Coso R 16 5/16" 
13. 03/1987 Mexico, Campeche Julio de Coso R 16 4/16" 
14. 05/1982 Mexico, Jalisco Alvaro Zuno Arce R 16" 
15. 05/1986 Mexico, Puerta Vallarta Alvaro Zuno Arce R 16" 
16. 04/1971 Belize, Orange Walk Curtis Prock R 15 15/16" 
17. 01/1968 Mexico, Yucatan Pen. R 15 14/16" 
18. 12/1970 Mexico, Sonora R 15 14/16" 
19. 08/1966 Belize John Littlejohn / Tiger Safaris H 15 13/16" 
20. 01/1964 Belize, n. border Daniel Tillet R 15 8/16"

DESCRIPTION (male) Adult North American jaguars are 6-8 feet (1.8-2.4 m) in length, including 18-24 inches (46-61 cm) of tail. Shoulder height 25-30 inches (64-76 cm). Weight 100-160 pounds (45-75 kg), sometimes more. Females are about 25 percent smaller than males. Chromosome count is 38.

The jaguar is the largest cat in the Western Hemisphere. About the same length and height as the cougar, but more compactly and powerfully built. The coat is yellow to reddish-yellow, with whitish or light buff underparts. There are black spots on head, neck and legs, and large black blotches on the underparts. The back and sides have large black rosettes with one or more black spots in the center. The tail is relatively short, with strong black markings toward the tip. Black, or melanistic, individuals are fairly common, but their spots can still be seen faintly.

BEHAVIOR The male is solitary and territorial, a wanderer with a home range that is twice the size of a female's and will overlap those of several females. Breeding usually takes place in the spring in northern areas, but there is no fixed season in the tropics. Females mate every 2-3 years, bearing a litter of 1-4 kittens that remain with the mother for about two years. Full growth and sexual maturity are reached in 3-4 years. Life expectancy about 15 years, although captives have lived as long as 22 years.

Jaguars are entirely carnivorous, preying largely on peccaries and deer, but also on smaller mammals, fish and snakes. They often kill domestic livestock, which has made them unpopular with ranchers and has led to their persecution. They are good tree climbers and excellent swimmers; unlike most cats, they are fond of water. May be diurnal or nocturnal, depending on the presence of humans. Eyesight and hearing are excellent, sense of smell reasonably good. As a so-called "great" cat, the jaguar is able to roar; however, its usual vocalization is a series of deep, raspy, coughing grunts.

HABITAT Forest, preferably dense and near rivers or swamps. Also in open country if prey animals are plentiful there. Found in scrub and desert in northern parts of its range.

DISTRIBUTION Mexico and Central America. Wanderers occasionally occur as far north as Arizona, New Mexico and Texas.

Also found throughout South America, except in the extreme south (South American jaguars are larger than those in North America).

TAXONOMIC NOTES Eight subspecies of jaguar are usually recognized, five from North America and three from South America. The North American subspecies are: arizonensis (Arizona jaguar) from Sonora, Arizona and New Mexico, pale buff in color with rosettes broken into spots; hernandisii (Pacific Coast jaguar) from a narrow strip along the Pacific coast from Sonora to Oaxaca, with broken-up, barely perceptible rosettes; veraecrucis (Gulf Coast jaguar) from the coastal forests along the Gulf of Mexico from Texas to Veracruz; goldmani (Yucatan jaguar) from the Yucatan Peninsula, with a bold, intense color pattern; and centralis (Central American jaguar) from Guatemala to Panama and extending into Colombia in South America, a small form with distinct rosettes. All North American subspecies are combined for record-keeping.

STATUS In parts of Mexico and Central America (and also in South America), jaguars are plentiful and detrimental to livestock, and may lawfully be hunted. Nonetheless, all jaguars everywhere are listed as endangered by the USF&WS (1972) and are on Appendix I of CITES (1975). They may not be imported into the United States, which is unfortunate for U.S. residents, as the jaguar has always been considered one of the top hunting trophies of the Americas and of the world.

REMARKS The University of Mexico has been authorized by the Mexican government to conduct a jaguar study program whereby a limited number of jaguars are darted and tranquilized, photographed, measured, aged, fitted with radio collars and revived so that their movements and numbers can be monitored and evaluated. The jaguar is baited and/or trailed by a pack of dogs until it climbs a tree where it can be darted. A wildlife biologist provided by the university or an official of the biosphere reserve accompanies the darting expedition, and care is taken to assure that the jaguar is not harmed. For a fee (which is used to support the program), sportsmen are permitted to take part in these non-lethal hunts and to fire the dart gun. This program is coordinated in Mexico by United for Conservation, a Mexican non-profit organization directed by SCI member Carlos Manterola. In the early stages of this program it was coordinated by the late David Hanlin.

SCI accepts Record Book entries for jaguars (and incidental cougars) darted as part of this study, and uses body measurements taken by the field biologist to arrive at the score.