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Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Printable Version

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RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Luipaard - 04-12-2020

'Strawberry' leopard collared

"History was made last week when the first red leopard was collared by Gerrie Camacho of the Mpumalanga Tourism and Parks Agency, supported by a group of local people

The first images of this animal were taken in December last year. Since then, Camacho has been trying to track the animal in order to collar it. On January 7 the leopard was darted and sedated and the collar fitted.

Camacho said the male was about two years old and weighing in at 48kg."


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

Source: https://steelburgernews.co.za/171312/first-ever-red-leopard-collared/?fbclid=IwAR0W8yaGExxrPRoMXg7HYoNvTCTeUvRsccj-PA9hUHRG0FC88Ca1gvPZ1SQ#.VLZ7eNs7Ifs.facebook


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Luipaard - 05-01-2020

Skull data of different Persian leopard populations and some other subspecies (Arabian & Indian)


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


Males and females were not separated in the samples and sometimes the gender was unknown. Quick summary:
  • Persian leopards from North Caucasus (10): 216.3 mm x 137.3 mm
  • Persian leopards from South Caucasus (5): 237.1 mm x 152.7 mm
  • Persian leopards from Turkmenistan (5): 217.3 mm x 143.1 mm
  • Persian leopard from Northern Iran (1): 225.1 mm x 139.5 mm
  • Persian leopards from Southern Iran (2): 227.9 mm x 144.4 mm
  • Persian leopards from Southern Pakistan (3): 212.0 mm x 134.4 mm
  • Persian leopards from South-western Turkey (2): 212.9 mm x 138.9 mm
  • Indian leopard from Kashmir (1): 207.8 mm x 135.9 mm
  • Arabian leopard from Sinai (1): 194.0 mm x 127.4 mm
  • Arabian leopard from Arabian Peninsula (1): 164.1 mm x 105.5 mm
From Taxonomic status of the leopard, Panthera pardus (Carnivora, Felidae) in the Caucasus and adjacent areas (link)


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Pckts - 05-01-2020

(05-01-2020, 03:31 PM)Luipaard Wrote: Skull data of different Persian leopard populations and some other subspecies (Arabian & Indian)


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


Males and females were not separated in the samples and sometimes the gender was unknown. Quick summary:
  • Persian leopards from North Caucasus (10): 216.3 mm x 137.3 mm
  • Persian leopards from South Caucasus (5): 237.1 mm x 152.7 mm
  • Persian leopards from Turkmenistan (5): 217.3 mm x 143.1 mm
  • Persian leopard from Northern Iran (1): 225.1 mm x 139.5 mm
  • Persian leopards from Southern Iran (2): 227.9 mm x 144.4 mm
  • Persian leopards from Southern Pakistan (3): 212.0 mm x 134.4 mm
  • Persian leopards from South-western Turkey (2): 212.9 mm x 138.9 mm
  • Indian leopard from Kashmir (1): 207.8 mm x 135.9 mm
  • Arabian leopard from Sinai (1): 194.0 mm x 127.4 mm
  • Arabian leopard from Arabian Peninsula (1): 164.1 mm x 105.5 mm
From Taxonomic status of the leopard, Panthera pardus (Carnivora, Felidae) in the Caucasus and adjacent areas (link)

So #9 is the zygomatic arch width?
Also, are the weights listed?
And it looks like Southern Iran and S. Caucasus were actually larger than the north?
I recall you saying the north were larger than the south, no?


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Luipaard - 05-01-2020

@Pckts 

Quote:So #9 is the zygomatic arch width?

Yes it is:


*This image is copyright of its original author


Quote:Also, are the weights listed?

No, these are skulls from various musuems and private collections:

"The examined material is housed at the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint-Petersburg, Russia (ZIN), Zoological Museum of the Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia (ZMMU), Municipal Museum, Stavropol, Russia (MUM), S. Janashia State Museum, former Caucasus Museum, Tbilisi, Georgia (JSM), Natural History Museum, Baku, Azerbaijan (NHMB), Natural History Museum, London, UK (NHM) and in private collections."

Quote:And it looks like Southern Iran and S. Caucasus were actually larger than the north?

I recall you saying the north were larger than the south, no?

According to My Journey with Persian Leopard they are:

"leopards in Tandoureh are exceptionally big, sometimes up-to 20% than similar cohorts in southern Iran. Big males in Tandoureh weigh 75 kg or more while in central arid mountains, they are normally less than 60 kg."

Perhaps there were more females in the sample from North Caucasus? After all, that sample contained 10 leopards (vs 5 from South Caucasus).

The largest Persian leopard skull (and one of the largest in general) is from a male leopard in Golestan National Park (Northern Iran): 288 mm x 181 mm


*This image is copyright of its original author

From Population status of the Persian Leopard(Panthera pardus saxicolor Pocock, 1927) in Iran (link)


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Pckts - 05-01-2020

(05-01-2020, 08:26 PM)Luipaard Wrote: @Pckts 

Quote:So #9 is the zygomatic arch width?

Yes it is:


*This image is copyright of its original author


Quote:Also, are the weights listed?

No, these are skulls from various musuems and private collections:

"The examined material is housed at the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint-Petersburg, Russia (ZIN), Zoological Museum of the Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia (ZMMU), Municipal Museum, Stavropol, Russia (MUM), S. Janashia State Museum, former Caucasus Museum, Tbilisi, Georgia (JSM), Natural History Museum, Baku, Azerbaijan (NHMB), Natural History Museum, London, UK (NHM) and in private collections."

Quote:And it looks like Southern Iran and S. Caucasus were actually larger than the north?

I recall you saying the north were larger than the south, no?

According to My Journey with Persian Leopard they are:

"leopards in Tandoureh are exceptionally big, sometimes up-to 20% than similar cohorts in southern Iran. Big males in Tandoureh weigh 75 kg or more while in central arid mountains, they are normally less than 60 kg."

Perhaps there were more females in the sample from North Caucasus? After all, that sample contained 10 leopards (vs 5 from South Caucasus).

The largest Persian leopard skull (and one of the largest in general) is from a male leopard in Golestan National Park (Northern Iran): 288 mm x 181 mm


*This image is copyright of its original author

From Population status of the Persian Leopard(Panthera pardus saxicolor Pocock, 1927) in Iran (link)

I wish they mentioned Age/Sex, could of been useful here.

In regards to the Largest Skull:
I'm assuming the corresponding weight and measurements for that Leopard is this one

Golestan NP 213Cm total Length,  86Kg body weight
Probably around 122cm body length?


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Styx38 - 05-01-2020

(05-01-2020, 03:31 PM)Luipaard Wrote: Skull data of different Persian leopard populations and some other subspecies (Arabian & Indian)


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


Males and females were not separated in the samples and sometimes the gender was unknown. Quick summary:
  • Persian leopards from North Caucasus (10): 216.3 mm x 137.3 mm
  • Persian leopards from South Caucasus (5): 237.1 mm x 152.7 mm
  • Persian leopards from Turkmenistan (5): 217.3 mm x 143.1 mm
  • Persian leopard from Northern Iran (1): 225.1 mm x 139.5 mm
  • Persian leopards from Southern Iran (2): 227.9 mm x 144.4 mm
  • Persian leopards from Southern Pakistan (3): 212.0 mm x 134.4 mm
  • Persian leopards from South-western Turkey (2): 212.9 mm x 138.9 mm
  • Indian leopard from Kashmir (1): 207.8 mm x 135.9 mm
  • Arabian leopard from Sinai (1): 194.0 mm x 127.4 mm
  • Arabian leopard from Arabian Peninsula (1): 164.1 mm x 105.5 mm
From Taxonomic status of the leopard, Panthera pardus (Carnivora, Felidae) in the Caucasus and adjacent areas (link)


Slight nitpick, but aren't Leopards in Turkey and Pakistan designated as different subspecies?


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Rishi - 05-01-2020

(05-01-2020, 10:43 PM)Styx38 Wrote:
(05-01-2020, 03:31 PM)Luipaard Wrote: Skull data of different Persian leopard populations and some other subspecies (Arabian & Indian)


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


Males and females were not separated in the samples and sometimes the gender was unknown. Quick summary:
  • Persian leopards from North Caucasus (10): 216.3 mm x 137.3 mm
  • Persian leopards from South Caucasus (5): 237.1 mm x 152.7 mm
  • Persian leopards from Turkmenistan (5): 217.3 mm x 143.1 mm
  • Persian leopard from Northern Iran (1): 225.1 mm x 139.5 mm
  • Persian leopards from Southern Iran (2): 227.9 mm x 144.4 mm
  • Persian leopards from Southern Pakistan (3): 212.0 mm x 134.4 mm
  • Persian leopards from South-western Turkey (2): 212.9 mm x 138.9 mm
  • Indian leopard from Kashmir (1): 207.8 mm x 135.9 mm
  • Arabian leopard from Sinai (1): 194.0 mm x 127.4 mm
  • Arabian leopard from Arabian Peninsula (1): 164.1 mm x 105.5 mm
From Taxonomic status of the leopard, Panthera pardus (Carnivora, Felidae) in the Caucasus and adjacent areas (link)


Slight nitpick, but aren't Leopards in Turkey and Pakistan designated as different subspecies?

No. Anatolian leopard is like Korean tiger, speculated to be possible subspecies but never proven.

And western parts of Pakistan along Iran & Afghanistan has Persian leopards, while the northern parts along Himalayas has Indian leopard.


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Luipaard - 05-02-2020

(05-01-2020, 10:09 PM)Pckts Wrote:
(05-01-2020, 08:26 PM)Luipaard Wrote: @Pckts 

Quote:So #9 is the zygomatic arch width?

Yes it is:


*This image is copyright of its original author


Quote:Also, are the weights listed?

No, these are skulls from various musuems and private collections:

"The examined material is housed at the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Saint-Petersburg, Russia (ZIN), Zoological Museum of the Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia (ZMMU), Municipal Museum, Stavropol, Russia (MUM), S. Janashia State Museum, former Caucasus Museum, Tbilisi, Georgia (JSM), Natural History Museum, Baku, Azerbaijan (NHMB), Natural History Museum, London, UK (NHM) and in private collections."

Quote:And it looks like Southern Iran and S. Caucasus were actually larger than the north?

I recall you saying the north were larger than the south, no?

According to My Journey with Persian Leopard they are:

"leopards in Tandoureh are exceptionally big, sometimes up-to 20% than similar cohorts in southern Iran. Big males in Tandoureh weigh 75 kg or more while in central arid mountains, they are normally less than 60 kg."

Perhaps there were more females in the sample from North Caucasus? After all, that sample contained 10 leopards (vs 5 from South Caucasus).

The largest Persian leopard skull (and one of the largest in general) is from a male leopard in Golestan National Park (Northern Iran): 288 mm x 181 mm


*This image is copyright of its original author

From Population status of the Persian Leopard(Panthera pardus saxicolor Pocock, 1927) in Iran (link)

I wish they mentioned Age/Sex, could of been useful here.

In regards to the Largest Skull:
I'm assuming the corresponding weight and measurements for that Leopard is this one

Golestan NP 213Cm total Length,  86Kg body weight
Probably around 122cm body length?

It's never been specified but yes, that's a possibility.

The skull (288 mm x 181 mm) was in fact from a large leopard killed by a road accident:


*This image is copyright of its original author


They did share some measurements of 5 specimens, with one from Golestan National Park weighing 86kg but nowhere did they mention it being the roadkilled one.


*This image is copyright of its original author



Quote:Slight nitpick, but aren't Leopards in Turkey and Pakistan designated as different subspecies?


The Anatolian leopard is a Persian leopard population:


*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Luipaard - 05-04-2020

70kg male leopard collared

Sunday November 9th marked the day of capturing the first leopard in my career. The event was too beautiful to mar with heavy words. Here is a full account of what happened that day in pictures.

Removing the leopard from the trap requires a lot of strength (70 kg cat = an X-cat):

*This image is copyright of its original author

...and team work

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...and an open area.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Paddy has a broken tooth.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Examining the leopard.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Preparing the collar.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Collar fitted and ready to go.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Two days later, Paddy is looking good!

*This image is copyright of its original author

Source: https://www.awf.org/blog/first-leopard-captured


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Luipaard - 05-09-2020

Body measurements of 3 leopards in Namibia


*This image is copyright of its original author


Source: https://www.biosphere-expeditions.org/images/stories/pdfs/reports/report-namibia14.pdf?fbclid=IwAR3d5OJ5oS-fK1V2Bq65QPQEn-Q94h5575b_XjjJjiH4hD4DCRlOkpbN20o


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Luipaard - 05-09-2020

85kg male leopard 'Mvumba'


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


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*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Luipaard - 05-17-2020

Injured Adult Male Leopard Brought to CWRC for Treatment

"On the night of May 9, officials of the Bokial Forest Beat, Golaghat Forest Division trapped an adult male leopard that had created a panic among the populace in Bokial Tea Estate. In its efforts to escape the trap cage the leopard sustained several injuries, whereupon forest officials decided that it should be brought to CWRC (the Centre for Wildlife Rehabilitation and Conservation; IFAW-WTI and the Assam Forest Department’s wildlife rescue, treatment and rehabilitation facility near Kaziranga National Park) for treatment before its eventual release back into the wild.

The leopard was brought to the centre on May 10. Its body morphometry was recorded while it was under sedation: a full-grown adult male weighing 66kg and that had not been previously microchipped."


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

Source: https://www.wti.org.in/news/injured-adult-male-leopard-brought-to-cwrc-for-treatment/


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Luipaard - 05-18-2020






RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Pckts - 06-01-2020

Landmark Leopard & Predator Project - South Africa

Leopard No 63 rescued.

We are happy to report that today the Landmark Foundation rescued its 63rd leopard. We are working collaboratively with some of the landowners in the Moutonshoek Protected Environment near Piketberg in the Western Cape and captured, collared and released on site this male leopard. He is in the prime of life and in brilliant condition, weighing 60kg, which is a very large male for the area.

The leopard was collared and released on site as part of a conflict mitigation project, and research into management options for leopards in agricultural production landscapes.

Our published research has demonstrated that only 500 adult leopards remain in the Western Cape, and 400 in the Eastern Cape. They exist in small population pockets with variable connectivity between these areas and have shown (also via peer reviewed research) that the population is genetically bottlenecking. It is critical for their survival that we fight for each leopard and their population connectivity. Leopards do not utilize transformed landscapes.

Historically these leopards would be removed or killed and we have worked with the farmers in the area to ensure that they stay in situ.

The purposes of our efforts are as follows:

• Stop the persecution of leopards in human wildlife conflict: We run a compensation system for participant farmers that introduce non-lethal controls whereby we pay them out market slaughter value for the animals that are killed by the leopards.

• The leopards are GPS collared and we use the positional data to study population dynamics, verify leopard caused livestock losses (and on this basis pay out compensation), and analyze the functionality of the predicted connectivity corridors in remnant habitats. The Piketberg is a particularly interesting area as it seems to have been recolonized after earlier decimation of the leopard populations. It is also an unusual island like habitat with a “sea of land transformation” surrounding it but with connectivity to known source populations in the Cederberg in the northwest. Fascinating data is emerging from our camera surveys and other collared leopards in the area. The population dynamics in this region seems particularly interesting.

• We are evaluating the effectiveness of compensations and mitigation practices through this research.

• We conduct genetic analysis of population structure of all leopards we can obtain a tissue sample from.

• We are also evaluating the effectiveness and determinants of effectiveness of local leopard translocations as a management option for conflict leopards and the proven genetic bottlenecking that the remnant populations are showing.

We thank the Smit family for their collaboration. Thank you also to Cape Nature for your inputs today and help in the field. We are grateful to Piketberg Animal Hospital for the veterinary services. We value your collaboration!

*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Luipaard - 06-01-2020

"Over the last couple weeks we have collared 3 wild cheetahs from different range areas on our farms and are currently collecting data on their movements. This is CCF’s first time using GMS collars and will allow for a much more detailed data collection. All three are cheetahs that we have seen on this year’s camera census. One is a tailless male that we have seen in the previous year’s census, and he appears to be doing quite well despite the lack of a tail.

Today we inadvertently caught a Leopard in one of the cage traps. He was a large male weighing in at 71kg! This was some unexpected excitement as we drove up to the check the trap. Our team did a medical workup in the field in order to collect biological samples and take measurements. We believe he is a male found on the cameras from the neighbouring farm. This gave us a great opportunity to learn more about the other predators on our farms. With one collar left we await the final cheetah and so check the cages throughout the day."


*This image is copyright of its original author

https://cheetah.org/ccf-blog/conservation/cheetahs-and-an-unexpected-leopard/