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Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Printable Version

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RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Ngala - 01-09-2018

Male leopard from N/a’an ku sê Wildlife Sanctuary, Namibia.

Photo and information credits: N/a’an ku sê
"On Thursday, December 28th, 2017, the N/a'an ku sê Rapid Response Unit received a call regarding a captured leopard. A male leopard, weighing a hefty 74kg, is believed to have predated on a calf and this prompted the farmer to set up a bait cage in order to lure him. The team rushed to the location where they sedated the feline and fitted it with a GPS collar. Our resident vet ascertained that the leopard was in prime health, after which it was released back onto the property. The concerned gentleman has previously worked with N/a'an ku sê and is an ardent supporter of conservation. The farmer now receives daily updates on the movements of the collard leopard so that he can adjust his livestock protection methods to co-exist with this resident big cat."

*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - epaiva - 01-21-2018

Table with measurements and weights of adult Leopards from different locations, taken from the book Wild Cats of the World (Mel Sunquist and Fiona Sunquist)
Picture credit to @leopard_mylove


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Big Cat Interactions - Interspecific Conflicts - AlexE - 04-29-2018

(04-29-2018, 03:44 PM)Nyers Wrote:
(04-29-2018, 03:39 PM)AlexE Wrote: Big female leopard 60 kg
 
pregnant and after good dinner?

While males weigh 37–90 kg (82–198 lb), females weigh 28–60 kg (62–132 lb). 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopard

There are large female leopards

Lagre male leopard 112 kg


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Big Cat Interactions - Interspecific Conflicts - Nyers - 04-29-2018

(04-29-2018, 06:12 PM)AlexE Wrote: females weigh 28–60 kg (62–132 lb). 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopard

There are large female leopards


this is exceptional cases, very rare
maybe it's like a story about jaguar with weight around 158 kg, but his stomach was a full after good meal and the real weight of this big guy is certainly less


RE: Big Cat Interactions - Interspecific Conflicts - Nyers - 04-29-2018

(04-29-2018, 06:12 PM)AlexE Wrote: Lagre male leopard 112 kg

And about picture
This cat looks smaller than big male leopard Tingana with massive neck photo of which you so love to post in group of vk  and im not sure that he(Tingana) ever weighed more than 85-90 kg.


RE: Big Cat Interactions - Interspecific Conflicts - AlexE - 04-29-2018

(04-29-2018, 06:46 PM)Nyers Wrote:
(04-29-2018, 06:12 PM)AlexE Wrote: Lagre male leopard 112 kg

And about picture
This cat looks smaller than big male leopard Tingana with massive neck photo of which you so love to post in group of vk  and im not sure that he(Tingana) ever weighed more than 85-90 kg.

LOL 

Anderson is larger than Tingana


RE: Big Cat Interactions - Interspecific Conflicts - Nyers - 04-29-2018

(04-29-2018, 08:10 PM)AlexE Wrote: LOL 

Anderson is larger than Tingana

so?
if you dont understand i tried compare this died leopard who probably weights around 114 kg on posted picture and Tingana. For me Mister T looks larger but according by guides from Safarilive Tingana never weighed more than 90 kilo
or you can compare with this leopard weight around 90 kg

*This image is copyright of its original author

http://www.huntingreport.com/worldupdate.cfm?articleid=394

https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-modern-weights-and-measurements-of-leopards?pid=37120#pid37120
and you still believe in information about 114 kg?


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Ngala - 05-01-2018

From AfriCat Namibia:

Pp 44 aka AMALI (meaning HOPE in Swahili) was successfully fitted with a VHF-collar last week.

The team was able to catch the young female in one of the capture boxes and collar her under the supervision of our AfriCat Veterinarian Dr Rodenwoldt. The female is approximately two years of age and one of JoJo’s cubs, who was killed by a warthog in January 2018.

Since then AfriCat’s research team is monitoring both sub-adult cubs (two females) via remote camera traps to evaluate their body condition and health. While her sister (Pp 43) is seemingly in good physical shape, Pp 44 weighs 25 kg and is very slender and lean. Due to the newly fitted collar, we are now able to keep a better eye on her and monitor her well-being closely.

It is always a risk collaring younger cats as they often outgrow their collars every few months. We are keeping a close eye on her & will adjust the collar as she grows.

#AfriCat #Namibia #leopard #bigcatconservation #Okonjima
www.africat.org

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Ngala - 08-05-2018

From AfriCat Namibia:

Last week we were able to fit Pp 34 with a VHF collar. The leopard female, named Zani, was first recorded in 2016 during the course of the initial phase of the Okonjima/AfriCat leopard density study. Since then, she is regularly captured on remote camera traps which are monitoring the resident leopard population. Her home range is located in the northern part of the reserve, where she was caught with two cubs on camera in December 2017.

Zani, meaning “accident” in Swahili as we in fact intended to collar another leopard at that time, was in overall good condition and weighed in at 37.0 kilogram.

She will be an essential part of the leopard research project giving us conclusions about the leopards occurring in a less frequented area of the reserve.

#AfriCat #Namibia #wildlifeconservation #leopard #research
http://www.africat.org


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - ShereKhan - 08-07-2018

It seems weird to me that in 2018 they still use a archaic method like a radio collar. In America (don't know if this is done anywhere else) you can put a tracking microchip in your dog or cat. It has your home address, phone number, a tracking ID, and other info right on a thumbnail sized chip that is inserted in the back of your pet, around the shoulder and all the info can be read with a scanner. It's a very easy incision, quick and easy "surgery". Less than 20 minutes. Yet here we are using large, cumbersome radio collars. You would think they could put a chip in a leopard or a lion without much fuss.


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Pckts - 08-07-2018

@ShereKhan 
Microchips used here in the states are for identification not tracking, I’m sure if there was a better method for tracking they’d use it.


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - ShereKhan - 08-08-2018

(08-07-2018, 06:08 PM)Pckts Wrote: @ShereKhan 
Microchips used here in the states are for identification not tracking, I’m sure if there was a better method for tracking they’d use it.

All my pets have a GPS tracker on their collars.  You can buy them on Amazon for less than $100. And they're small.


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Pckts - 08-08-2018

(08-08-2018, 12:55 AM)ShereKhan Wrote:
(08-07-2018, 06:08 PM)Pckts Wrote: @ShereKhan 
Microchips used here in the states are for identification not tracking, I’m sure if there was a better method for tracking they’d use it.

All my pets have a GPS tracker on their collars.  You can buy them on Amazon for less than $100. And they're small.
I’m sure the collars sold for pets aren’t nearly as sophisticated or durable as the ones used for wildlife.

The use of tracking collars is one of the most common methods of monitoring wild animals
  • It allows researchers and managers to collect baseline data like home range sizes, daily movements, behavioural data and diet.
  • Radio tracking involves fitting the study animal with a radio collar. These collars are designed to minimize impact on the animals’ behaviour and to maximize their detectability.
  • They come in a variety of belt and battery sizes; in general the weight of the collar should be no more than 4 to 5 percent of the animal’s body weight for mammals, depending on the species. For example, the weight of a collar for an wild dog shouldn’t exceed 450grams.
Depending on the species of animal, the collars can be customized with sensors to recognize different movement activity, temperature and even mortality. When the movement sensor detects no movement, after a pre-programmed period of time, it changes the pulse rate to a higher or lower rate indicating change in behaviour (e.g. resting or stationary).
Let’s look at the different types of tracking collars:
1. STANDARD VHF COLLARS
How they work: The ‘VHF’ stands for ‘very high frequency’ collar, also known as a pulse collar. VHF transmitters attached to a study animal emit a pulsed radio signal allowing a person to physically locate and observe the animal by homing into the signal using a receiver and directional antenna.
Advantages: VHF transmitters are easy to use, reliable, versatile and affordable providing exceptional value. They can be used for a wide variety of animals, and the operating life of the battery can last up to three years. This type of collar can be available with an internal antenna as an option, for use when there is a high chance of the antenna being chewed.
Approximate cost of collar: $350 (including delivery)

and I'm sure as technology grows, the devices used will be less invasive. It isn't necessarily the collar that is the hard part, it's the capture it self. We had a debate a while back on if it's actually worth it to collar wildlife, do the benefits outweigh the flaws.
Many animals have died from being drug overdosed during the procedure, many big cats have became man eaters afterwards and aggressive towards people as well as the possibility of hackers using the data to locate wildlife.
It was an interesting debate with both sides sharing some good points, but any way, that's my 2 cents. 


RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Ngala - 08-22-2018

From AfriCat Namibia:

Collaring of Terra and Nova

During this and the preceding year we were able to monitor and study the mother-offspring dynamics between Isaskia and her two male cubs thoroughly. This is the first litter since her initial collaring which she managed to raise until adulthood. The former helpless and vulnerable cubs who were entirely reliant on their mothers’ care have now grown into two handsome sub-adult leopard males of impressive size. Because the two males are spending more and more time apart from their mother, both were fitted with VHF radio collars last week. Collaring sub-adult individuals is giving us the unique opportunity to monitor and understand the underlying mechanisms of natal dispersal behavior in an environment of high leopard density.

The cubs were named TERRA and NOVA meaning “New Land” (Terra means “land” and Nova means “new).

Upon immobilization Terra and Nova were in excellent condition, both with a shiny and supple coat and clean teeth with no enamel scratches or cracks. Even though the two males are the same age, Nova who is the larger and more dominant of the two cubs weighs a remarkable 20 kilogram more than his lighter brother, Terra who only weighed 34.3 kilogram.

We are excited to be able to accompany them during their process of becoming independent adult male leopards who are trying to find their feet and territory in a protected and fenced area with an existing high leopard population.

#AfriCat #Namibia #leopard #research #conservationphotography

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Modern Weights and Measurements of Leopards - Pckts - 04-02-2019

(01-21-2018, 01:49 AM)epaiva Wrote: Table with measurements and weights of adult Leopards from different locations, taken from the book Wild Cats of the World (Mel Sunquist and Fiona Sunquist)
Picture credit to @leopard_mylove


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

Persians for Comparison

*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author

https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Size-distribution-of-craniometric-and-morphometric-variables-in-Persian-Leopards-a_fig3_264461688