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RE: Bigcats News - Sully - 07-06-2017

Just saw this while scrolling through social media, shocking stuff. Confirmed it on a quick google search.


*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Bigcats News - Pckts - 07-06-2017

(07-06-2017, 10:07 PM)SVTIGRIS Wrote: Just saw this while scrolling through social media, shocking stuff. Confirmed it on a quick google search.


*This image is copyright of its original author

I just read that as well, hopefully the tigers aren't the ones to suffer.Desperation causes people to do horrible things with no regard of life around them, hopefully this isn't another one of those cases.


RE: Bigcats News - Rishi - 07-11-2017

I'm not sure if this story belongs here, but would really present a proper picture of the current scenario at south Kathiawar.


In Guj, woman delivers in ambulance surrounded by 12 lions

Ahmedabad  June 30, 2017, Updated at 22:57 IST 

Manguben Makwana will never forget the night of June 29. The 32-year-old delivered a baby in the vicinity of the Gir forest in an ambulance after midnight -- but that was not all. 

Even as she gave birth to a boy, a group of 12 lions emerged from the adjacent forests and surrounded the vehicle near a remote village in Amreli district. 
During this ordeal, which lasted for around 20 minutes, the paramedic staff of the '108' ambulance tackled the situation with courage and helped Makwana in giving birth, while the lion pride, including three males, blocked the vehicle's passage. 


The incident occurred at around 2:30 am on Thursday when the ambulance was shifting Makwana, a resident of Lunasapur village, to the hospital in Jafarabad town, said Chetan Gaadhe, Emergency Management Executive of '108' in Amreli. 


"When the ambulance was on its way to Jafarabad with Makwana, the on-duty Emergency Management Technician (EMT) Ashok Makwana realised that she would give birth anytime, as the head of the baby was protruding out. Thus, he asked the driver Raju Jadav to stop the ambulance mid-way to deal with the emergency," said Gaadhe. 

While the EMT contacted a physician over phone to take directions, the pride of lions, sensing human presence, emerged from the nearby bushes and surrounded the ambulance. 

"Though Jadav, who is a local and understood the behaviour of lions, tried to scare them away, the lions refused to budge. Some of them even sat in front of the vehicle, blocking its passage," he said. 
Meanwhile, inside the vehicle, the calm EMT Ashok helped the woman deliver as per the directions given by the physician over phone while the driver Jadav monitored the movement of the "curious" lions, said Gaadhe. 

"Later, Jadav started the ambulance and moved very slowly towards the animals so that lions would give way. Upon seeing the movement of the vehicle as well as the blinking of lights, the big cats eventually moved and gave way to the ambulance," he said. 

The mother and the child are currently admitted to Jafrabad hospital. Both are hale and hearty.


RE: Bigcats News - Spalea - 07-11-2017

@Rishi :

About #1228: Perhaps this child is born with the spirit of lions...


RE: Bigcats News - Apollo - 07-13-2017

The new born child should be fed with lion milk.  Cool Cool Cool


RE: Bigcats News - parvez - 07-13-2017

Tiger Numbers Rising in Nepal

*This image is copyright of its original author

12 JUN 2017 — While tiger numbers in India continue to dwindle, they have increased significantly at Chitwan National Park in neighboring Nepal. The head-chief of Chitwan National Park, Ram Chandra Kandel has said that the number of tigers has increased between 10 to 20 percent. 
https://www.change.org/p/union-minister-of-environment-forest-and-climate-change-help-save-tigers/u/20524058


RE: Bigcats News - Pckts - 07-13-2017

(07-13-2017, 09:11 PM)parvez Wrote: Tiger Numbers Rising in Nepal

*This image is copyright of its original author

12 JUN 2017 — While tiger numbers in India continue to dwindle, they have increased significantly at Chitwan National Park in neighboring Nepal. The head-chief of Chitwan National Park, Ram Chandra Kandel has said that the number of tigers has increased between 10 to 20 percent. 
https://www.change.org/p/union-minister-of-environment-forest-and-climate-change-help-save-tigers/u/20524058

I'm hesitant to accept this claim just yet

"As per The Global Tiger Recovery Plan, which was endorsed in the St Petersburg Declaration on Tiger conservation in 2010, Nepal committed to double its tiger population by 2022, from 121 to more than 250. The 2013 census report showed that the population of tigers in the national part was 120, while the number of young tigers across the country was 198."

 “The number of tigers must have increased by at least 10 to 20 per cent,” said Chief Kandel.


RE: Bigcats News - parvez - 07-13-2017

(07-13-2017, 09:37 PM)Pckts Wrote:
(07-13-2017, 09:11 PM)parvez Wrote: Tiger Numbers Rising in Nepal

*This image is copyright of its original author

12 JUN 2017 — While tiger numbers in India continue to dwindle, they have increased significantly at Chitwan National Park in neighboring Nepal. The head-chief of Chitwan National Park, Ram Chandra Kandel has said that the number of tigers has increased between 10 to 20 percent. 
https://www.change.org/p/union-minister-of-environment-forest-and-climate-change-help-save-tigers/u/20524058

I'm hesitant to accept this claim just yet

"As per The Global Tiger Recovery Plan, which was endorsed in the St Petersburg Declaration on Tiger conservation in 2010, Nepal committed to double its tiger population by 2022, from 121 to more than 250. The 2013 census report showed that the population of tigers in the national part was 120, while the number of young tigers across the country was 198."

 “The number of tigers must have increased by at least 10 to 20 per cent,” said Chief Kandel.
He said AT LEAST. According to this article, tiger population has doubled in nepal in span of three years. Yes anyways something is fishy here, as you said. 
http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/nepal-nearly-doubled-their-tiger-population-in-just-three-years/


RE: Bigcats News - Tshokwane - 07-14-2017

Credits to Panthera.

See and share these incredible photos--THE FIRST EVER--of a wild lioness nursing a leopard cub! Cross-species nursing such as this is highly unusual for big cats, but Joop Van Der Linde, a guest at Ndutu Safari Lodge in Tanzania's Ngorongoro Conservation Area, was lucky enough to catch the rare event on camera this week. The ultra-maternal lioness, 5-year-old 'Nosikitok,' is currently collared and monitored by Kope Lion, a conservation NGO supported by Panthera, and thought to have given birth to a litter of cubs in June.

Click on it to play.






RE: Bigcats News - Sully - 07-15-2017

Video: Capturing spotted cats with camera traps

Africa Geographic recently met up with the Cape Leopard Trust in the Cape, South Africa, to discover more about leopards and to find out why you should sign up for your free MySchool card to help raise funds for their environmental education programme.

*This image is copyright of its original author
©Cape Leopard Trust
Leopard populations in the Western Cape
Today there are approximately 30 – 35 adult male and female Cape leopards in a 3000km² area of the Cederberg Wilderness.
A study by Martins (2011) in the Cederberg region showed that the leopards here utilise far larger home ranges (between 235 km² and 600 km²) than previously recorded and hence that they occur at lower population densities than previously thought. In the wetter, fynbos region of the western Cederberg Wilderness Area, as well as in the Boland mountains, leopards have somewhat smaller ranges compared to the drier Karoo areas, and the population density is therefore slightly higher.
There is no definitive total for leopard numbers in the Western Cape, however data from recent leopard studies in three distinct mountain areas suggest that there are fewer than 1000 leopards in the Western Cape.

*This image is copyright of its original author
©Cape Leopard Trust
The Cederberg Project
On the 4 May, 2017, the #CederbergProject was launched with a lengthy deployment of cameras for their long-awaited camera trap survey. This survey comprises of 130 cameras at 65 paired stations in a 1625km² area of mainly fynbos habitat in the Cederberg Wilderness Area and adjacent private property.
To place these cameras, the team had to hike to remote locations, clocking long hours in the rugged Cederberg terrain. These camera traps will provide invaluable insights into the lives of these elusive cats and become great educational resources for their outreach programmes.





Who wouldn’t be inspired to protect and conserve the leopard after seeing this video from a Boland project camera trap!
The Cape Leopard Trust was launched in 2004 as an active predator conservation working group in the Cape. It uses research as a tool for conservation, finding solutions to human-wildlife conflict and inspiring interest in the environment through an interactive and dynamic environmental education programme.
Help support a good cause by getting your free MySchool card. Select the Cape Leopard Trust as your beneficiary and every time you shop at one of the MySchool partner stores a percentage of your purchase will be given to the organisation.


RE: Bigcats News - Sully - 07-15-2017

8h
Amidst the ongoing man-animal conflict near Pilibhit Tiger Reserve, forest officials found the carcass of a tigress from a canal in the eastern part of the reserve on Wednesday evening.

The carcass was sent to the Indian Institute of Veterinary Science (IVRI), Bareilly, for post-mortem examination.

“The carcass was seen floating in a canal by some villagers who reported it to the local forest guard. The body has no signs of external injury and it seems the tigress died a natural death,” conservator of forests VK Singh said.

Officials said the tigress was at least 10 years’ old and was fully mature.

Forest officials said the tigress was not from Pilibhit Tiger Reserve. “Prima facie it appears that the tigress was from Surai Range in Uttarakhand and its carcass reached here through the canal,” said Singh.

“We have recorded the stripe pattern of the tigress which is being matched with the tigers of Pilibhit reserve,” he added.

Though the post-mortem report is awaited, rumours started doing the rounds that angered villagers have killed the tigress. Forest officials, however, refuted the reports.

At least 15 people living near the tiger reserve have been killed in tiger attacks in the last 10 months. The incidents have pitched the residents against the officials of tiger reserve.

There are over 50 adult tigers in Pilibhit reserve. Six of these are said to be present in the area where most of the tiger attacks have occurred. The forest officials have categorically denied that the carcass was of one of these six tigers.

“The place where the carcass was found is almost 50 kilometres away from the place of recent tiger attacks. Both the places are not connected with any water body. So it doesn’t make sense to connect the attacks with the dead tigress,” said Singh.


*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Bigcats News - Sully - 07-18-2017

MP forest officers in blame game over tiger deaths
The animals were found dead on March 28, 2016. The deaths of the animals were preceded by two other casualties of big cats near the park.

Written by Milind Ghatwai | Bhopal | Published:July 16, 2017 2:25 am
 
*This image is copyright of its original author
<img class="wp-image-2789672 size-full" src="http://images.indianexpress.com/2016/05/tiger-death-759.jpg" alt="Tiger death in Madhya Pradesh, MP Forest Officers Tiger Death, Blame Game on tiger deaths, Madhya Pradesh news, Indian Express News" /> (Representational Image)

MORE THAN 15 months after a tigress and two cubs were found poisoned to death inside the Pench Tiger Reserve in Madhya Pradesh, a war of words has broken out between the Indian Forest Service officers, one of them being partly responsible for poaching, and the other alleging that the meat of spotted deer killed in the park was served in nearby resorts.
The animals were found dead on March 28, 2016. Senior forest service officer Vinay Varman, then CEO of the state Ecotourism Development Board, had stayed in the park at the time. The deaths of the animals were preceded by two other casualties of big cats near the park.
A three-member inquiry committee’s report suggested that Varman’s presence in the park contributed to lax monitoring, as some staffers were busy attending to him. Submitted last year, the report has come to light recently. “It’s an attempt to shift blame,” Varman told The Sunday Express. “The committee’s report was based on the statement by a forest officer who had been chargesheeted, and who manipulated diary notings to escape responsibility.”

.



The committee headed by Additional Principal Chief Conservator of Forests (PCCF) R P Singh had Pench field director Shubhranjan Sen as a member. Varman, who is now managing director of MP Seeds and Farm Development Corporation, said the presence of the field director in whose park deaths have taken place in the committee, and the absence of an outsider, was in violation of rules for forming probe committees. Accusing the park management of laxity, even collusion, Varman said he fears the meat of spotted deer was being supplied in some resorts near the park, and that he had informed his seniors about this possibility.
Asked about Varman’s charges, Singh and Sen accused the officer of trying to shift blame off himself by raising the issue of poaching of the deer and supply of the animal’s meat. Denying Varman’s allegation about deer meat being served in resorts, Sen asked, “Where is the proof? Has he given any evidence to substantiate his allegations? I don’t think he was directly blamed for tiger poaching in the report.” Forest Minister Gaurishankar Shejwar was not available for a comment.




RE: Bigcats News - Sully - 07-20-2017

Good read
http://www.thehindu.com/society/beyond-the-barbed-wire/article19301502.ece


RE: Bigcats News - Apollo - 07-20-2017

Tiger kills two cubs in Tadoba reserve in Maharashtra


A male tiger killed two eight-month-old tiger cubs in a show of territorial dominance in Mul range of the buffer zone of Tadoba Andhari Tiger Reserve, said forest officers.


The incident occurred on Sunday night and forest officers found the bodies on Monday night. Forest officers ruled out poaching. “We spotted pug marks of a female and male adult tigers at the spot. We suspect that the cubs were killed to occupy territory or to persuade the female to mate,” said SJ Bobade, range forest office, Tadoba Andhari Tiger Reserve (TATR) Buffer, which has 20 tigers. He added that the post mortem report revealed that there were teeth marks of a male tiger on one of the cubs’ heads and the other one was ripped apart from the body.
Five tigers — three adult and two cubs — have died in Maharashtra this year owing to infighting, according to data from NGO Wildlife Protection Society of India (WPSI).

Forest officers and members of the National Tiger Conservation Authority have set up camera traps to identify the killer tiger in the area. “When we found the bodies, they were severely decomposed. One of the cubs had its entire head ripped off while the other had injuries on its head,” said Santosh Peddiwar, forest guard. “The investigation is underway to understand the movement of this animal, who might be dangerous to tigers or other animals in the buffer area.”

In India, there have been 19 cases of infighting among tigers so far, including this incident. Last year, there were 27 cases across the country.
“Most cases of tiger deaths during infighting begin with the need to obtain territory and even a young cub can pose a threat to an adult tiger that has aged,” said Tito Joseph, programme coordinator, WPSI.

“It has been seldom observed that tigers in search of tigresses kill the cubs to draw her attention for mating. However, our team is on the ground and we can say something conclusively only after a detailed investigation,” said Nitin Desai, director, central India, WPSI.

http://www.hindustantimes.com/mumbai-news/tiger-kills-two-cubs-in-tadoba-reserve-in-maharashtra/story-RT0NujW02TZMHxB85DGFaL.html


RE: Bigcats News - Ngala - 07-20-2017

Xanda, the oldest son of Cecil, was killed like his father by trophy hunters.

Son of Cecil the lion killed by trophy hunter
Six-year-old Xanda was shot and killed by hunters when he roamed outside the protected area of the Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe

 Xanda, son of Cecil, in the Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe. Photograph: Courtesy of Hwange National Park

*This image is copyright of its original author

A son of Cecil the lion has been killed by trophy hunters in Zimbabwe, meeting the same fate as his father whose death in 2015 caused a global outcry.

Xanda, who was six years old and believed to have fathered a number of cubs himself, was shot just outside the Hwange National Park, not far from where Cecil died.

The trophy hunt was organised by Zimbabwean private hunter Richard Cooke but his clients, who may have paid tens of thousands of dollars, have not been revealed. Xanda was wearing a tracking collar, fitted by scientists led by Andrew Loveridge at Oxford University, who have studied the Hwange lions for many years.

“I fitted it last October. It was monitored almost daily and we were aware that Xanda and his pride was spending a lot of time out of the park in the last six months, but there is not much we can do about that,” Loveridge told the Daily Telegraph.

“Richard Cooke is one of the ‘good’ guys. He is ethical and he returned the collar and communicated what had happened. His hunt was legal and Xanda was over six years old so it is all within the stipulated regulations,” Loveridge said.

He said he wanted a 5km no-hunting zone put in place around the Hwange National Park, to protect the lions that roam outside park. Cooke did not respond to requests for comment.

The Facebook group Lions of Hwange National Park said on Thursday that Xanda had been shot a few days ago: “Xanda has several young cubs. We can’t believe that now, two years since Cecil was killed, that his oldest cub has met the same fate.”

The death of Cecil the lion, killed by US dentist Walter Palmer, led to widespread criticism of the trophy hunting of lions, which has become a big business with the number killed tripling to 1,500 a year in the last decade. Lions have lost 90% of their overall population in the last century and only about 20,000 remain.

However, Prof David Macdonald, another of the Oxford team, told the Guardian in December that strictly regulated and sustainable hunting could provide valuable funds to protect lion habitats.

“It is unfathomable to me that there could be joy in killing them, but for me the priority is halting, indeed reversing, their decline,” he said. “Currently the evidence is that trophy hunting contributes to keeping hundreds of thousands of square kilometres available to lions and other wildlife.”

Cecil, who was 13 when killed, was believed to have had 13 surviving sons and daughters and 15 known grandcubs as of June 2016.