WildFact
Bigcats News - Printable Version

+- WildFact (https://wildfact.com/forum)
+-- Forum: Information Section (https://wildfact.com/forum/forum-information-section)
+--- Forum: Premier League (https://wildfact.com/forum/forum-premier-league)
+--- Thread: Bigcats News (/topic-bigcats-news)



RE: Bigcats News - Sully - 05-24-2016

Unfortunately I couldn't find any pictures of this particular male, it'd be a spectacle just to see an image of a tiger with that height!


RE: Bigcats News - Sully - 05-24-2016

Promising!



*This image is copyright of its original author


A snow leopard is collared in Kyrgyzstan
Credit: S. Kachel, Panthera, SAEF, NAS, UW
Scientists have collared an elusive snow leopard in the remote, rugged mountains of Kyrgyzstan.
The female cat was collared in the Sarychat-Ertash Strict Nature Reserve of Eastern Kyrgyzstan by biologists with the wild cat conservation organization Panthera, the State Agency on Environment Protection and Forestry and the National Academy of Sciences. The mama cat showed signs of having lactated in the past, suggesting she had given birth to at least one cub. This was the second time in six months that conservationists had succeeded in spotting and collaring a fertile female snow leopard in the country.
The sighting suggests the population of snow leopards (Panthera uncia) in this region could be recovering, after decades of relentless poaching, according to the scientists involved. [See Images of the Rare Snow Leopard Being Collared]

"It is so exciting to have two young productive females collared early in this study. It is a clear indication that Sarychat-Ertash, a place where snow leopards were nearly extirpated in the 1990s, is once again a stronghold for the species," Tom McCarthy, executive director of Panthera's Snow Leopard Program, said in a statement. "Kyrgyzstan can be very proud of this turnaround."
Mysterious creatures
The mysterious snow leopard lurks in the frigid, mountainous regions of 12 different countries in Asia. Yet these majestic creatures are often incredibly hard to spot; they glide silently through the snow on big, padded paws, and their thick, mottled white coats provide the perfect camouflage against the rocky, snow-flecked areas they prowl. The big cats are also highly reclusive by nature, meaning many locals who live alongside the cats have never seen them.
For decades, shepherds have hunted the cats to keep them from preying on their flocks.  Poachers have also targeted the majestic snow beasts for their fur and internal organs, which are prized in Chinese medicine.
The snow leopard has been listed as endangered since at least 1986 by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature. However, in recent years, scientists and lawmakers have increased conservation efforts dramatically, expanding the size of protected regions and using everything from camera traps to DNA analysis of snow leopard poop to learn more about the elusive creatures. Those efforts have begun to pay off, and researchers estimate that the population is on the rise, with between 4,500 and 10,000 snow leopards now living throughout Asia.
Supporting their young
Six months ago, scientists collared the first snow leopard in Kyrgyzstan. That animal was an adult female that was spotted prowling with three large cubs. The radio collar allowed the scientists an unprecedented look at a snow leopard's life.
"Through collaring, we learn of snow leopards' migration corridors, food preferences and threats to their survival," Abdikalik Rustamov, director of the State Agency for Environmental Protection and Forestry of the Kyrgyz Republic, said in the statement.
For instance, after collaring the first snow leopard, researchers were able to analyze 45 kill sites from the predatory cat. This helped them to deduce that mother cats hunting for food for their cubs need to catch prey at least every three to four days.   
The fact that there is enough habitat and prey to support female snow leopards and their babies, and that they feel safe enough to breed, are signs that conditions in Kyrgyzstan are improving for the big cats, the researchers said. That may be good for the broader snow leopard population, as the snowy heights of Kyrgyzstan potentially serve as a critical corridor through which the majestic cats can travel from the northern end of their habitat in Russia to the southern end of their range in China, where more than half of the snow leopards live, according to the researchers.


RE: Bigcats News - tigerluver - 05-25-2016


*This image is copyright of its original author

Cause : Natural death. 

A full grown tiger was found dead at Chikhaldara in Melghat Tiger Reserve (MTR) on Sunday. With a height of 125cm and length of 285cm, the tiger named T14 was the dominant male of Chikhaldara range for the last six years. According to sources, T14 had till now produced 30 cubs and the tiger was recorded in camera traps since 2013 and was last sighted on November 3, 2015. The putrefied carcass of the tiger was found by foresters Ashish Kokate, Satyafulla Solankhee and others during patrolling in Pachamba forest beat. Field director Dinesh Tyagi, deputy conservator of forests (DyCF), RK Wankhede, assistant conservator (ACF) Vishal Mali along with honorary wildlife warden Jayant Wadatkar and assistant commissioner of animal husbandry at Achalpur Dr VS Rahate rushed to the spot. 

Dr Rahate said prima facie it seems to be a natural death since there had been no tampering with the carcass. The tiger might have died of sunstroke. The carcass was five days old and in a highly decomposed state. Forest officials have sent samples of viscera, lungs, heart, stomach contents, maggots and water for forensic analysis at Nagpur to confirm the exact cause of death. The field director ruled out poaching as all the body parts such as skull, jaws, canines, nails and paws were intact. 

(Representational image)


Source: Save the Tiger from Facebook


RE: Bigcats News - Apollo - 05-27-2016

One more dead body of Tiger cub found in Kanha National Park, Five cubs have died in the past year.









RE: Bigcats News - Sully - 05-27-2016

@tigerluver I posted that article on #919


RE: Bigcats News - qstxyz - 05-27-2016

Indeed hurt when you's gone. I will never forget you.


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

As a cub.


*This image is copyright of its original author

In His Prime.


*This image is copyright of its original author

Taking His Father's Kingdom.


*This image is copyright of its original author

The Last Fight.


*This image is copyright of its original author

End of the Journey.
Goobye, Shashi...


RE: Bigcats News - Pckts - 05-27-2016

Welcome @qstxyz

Bamera will live on forever.


RE: Bigcats News - qstxyz - 05-27-2016

@Pckts Thanks.

Just knew his death 3 days ago.
His Era's so short but he fought like a real King.

Sorry for my bad English and just come back to say: "thank you all the original photographer of these Bamera's pictures, you bring him closer to me"

Goodbye and salute the wildlife


RE: Bigcats News - Sully - 05-28-2016

welcome! @qstxyz


RE: Bigcats News - Ngala - 05-29-2016

I don't think that this article was posted here before now. I don't follow the tigers , so i don't know if it's interesting, i hope it is.

Where are the big cats? Curious case of Ranthambore’s missing tigers


RE: Bigcats News - Apollo - 05-29-2016

Tiger killed in road accident in Haridwar




*This image is copyright of its original author



A four-year-old male tiger was killed after being hit by a vehicle while crossing road on Haridwar-Najibabad national highway, officials said on Sunday.

The incident occurred on Saturday night. Rasiabad range officer Pardeep Uniyal said they found the body of the tiger near the Pele Bridge following tip-off by local residents.

“The tiger had suffered serious head injury and died on the spot,” Uniyal said.

Witnesses said the big cat was run over by a vehicle while it was moving towards the forest of Rajaji Tiger Reserve Park.

“The cause of death is accidental injuries. Wild animals cross the highway passing through the forest area, which is proving deadly for them. Our teams are patrolling in night but heavy traffic on the road is creating problems,” the official said.

The tiger was buried in Chidyapur rescue centre after a post mortem.

Three leopards had been killed and several injured in road accidents on this highway in the last two years. But it is for the first time a tiger died in a road accident.
According to the All India Tiger Estimation of 2010, Uttarakhand had 227 tigers which swelled to 340 in 2014.


http://m.hindustantimes.com/dehradun/tiger-killed-in-road-accident-in-haridwar/story-aOIS9pUXD7uFAtjLml6sfM.html


RE: Bigcats News - Sully - 05-31-2016

Finally



'Mayhem' as authorities try to capture 137 tigers at Thai temple
By Kocha Olarn and Radina Gigova, CNN
Updated 0621 GMT (1421 HKT) May 31, 2016





*This image is copyright of its original author

6 photos: Thai authorities confiscate tigers from temple
Veterinarians prepare anesthetic syringes used to sedate the tigers.
Hide Caption
4 of 6

*This image is copyright of its original author

6 photos: Thai authorities confiscate tigers from temple
Thai wildlife officials load a sedated tiger into a cage on a truck.
Hide Caption
5 of 6

*This image is copyright of its original author

6 photos: Thai authorities confiscate tigers from temple
Thai wildlife officials carry a tiger on a stretcher from the temple.
Hide Caption
6 of 6

*This image is copyright of its original author

6 photos: Thai authorities confiscate tigers from temple
Thai wildlife officials use a tunnel of cages to capture a tiger and remove it from the Wat Pha Luang Ta Bua Tiger Temple in Kanchanaburi province, western Thailand on Monday, May 30, 2016. Authorities raided the compound over concerns for the welfare of the animals, and after complaints from tourists that they'd been attacked.
Hide Caption
1 of 6

*This image is copyright of its original author

6 photos: Thai authorities confiscate tigers from temple
A Thai wildlife official speaks with a monk at the Wat Pha Luang Ta Bua Tiger Temple. The temple refused to let authorities in for half a day until a court order was produced.
Hide Caption
2 of 6

*This image is copyright of its original author

6 photos: Thai authorities confiscate tigers from temple
The temple is home to 137 tigers. A wildlife official said when they finally entered the compound, monks had left the cages open and unchained the tigers to stall their removal.
Hide Caption
3 of 6

*This image is copyright of its original author

6 photos: Thai authorities confiscate tigers from temple
Veterinarians prepare anesthetic syringes used to sedate the tigers.
Hide Caption
4 of 6

*This image is copyright of its original author

6 photos: Thai authorities confiscate tigers from temple
Thai wildlife officials load a sedated tiger into a cage on a truck.
Hide Caption
5 of 6

*This image is copyright of its original author

6 photos: Thai authorities confiscate tigers from temple
Thai wildlife officials carry a tiger on a stretcher from the temple.
Hide Caption
6 of 6

*This image is copyright of its original author

6 photos: Thai authorities confiscate tigers from temple
Thai wildlife officials use a tunnel of cages to capture a tiger and remove it from the Wat Pha Luang Ta Bua Tiger Temple in Kanchanaburi province, western Thailand on Monday, May 30, 2016. Authorities raided the compound over concerns for the welfare of the animals, and after complaints from tourists that they'd been attacked.
Hide Caption
1 of 6

*This image is copyright of its original author

6 photos: Thai authorities confiscate tigers from temple
A Thai wildlife official speaks with a monk at the Wat Pha Luang Ta Bua Tiger Temple. The temple refused to let authorities in for half a day until a court order was produced.
Hide Caption
2 of 6

*This image is copyright of its original author

6 photos: Thai authorities confiscate tigers from temple
The temple is home to 137 tigers. A wildlife official said when they finally entered the compound, monks had left the cages open and unchained the tigers to stall their removal.
Hide Caption
3 of 6


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


Story highlights
  • Wildlife officials moved in after complaints from tourists and concerns for their welfare
  • The tigers are being moved to a compound in another province
Bangkok (CNN)Authorities armed with tranquilizer guns are still trying to capture dozens of tigers at a controversial Buddhist temple in Thailand after monks allegedly set some free to delay the process.
"Yesterday was mayhem," Wildlife Conservation Office (WCO) director Teunjai Noochdumrong told CNN Tuesday.
"When our vet team arrived, there were tigers roaming around everywhere," Noochdumrong said. "Looks like the temple intentionally let these tigers out, trying to obstruct our work."
The "Tiger Temple," in Kanchanaburi Province west of Bangkok, has long been popular with tourists, who could walk among the tigers and pose for photos. Thailand's Wildlife Conservation Office (WCO) said the temple's 137 tigers posed a danger to visitors and that they were being mistreated.

*This image is copyright of its original author
A tourist poses for a photo with a tiger at the Thai temple in 2012.
However, when staff from the WCO arrived Monday morning to remove the tigers, temple officials refused to let them in. After a half-day stand off, wildlife officers finally entered and were able to sedate eight tigers.
"We hope to gain more speed capturing them," Noochdumrong told CNN.
Capture in progress
The conservation office received a search warrant from a local court following failed negotiations with representatives from Wat Pha Luang Ta Bua Temple, as the Tiger Temple is officially known. The temple says it is a sanctuary for wild animals.
Over 2,000 personnel, including veterinarians, WCO civil servants, provisional police and local military are taking part in the mission to relocate the tigers to a compound in Ratchburi Province.
Suthipong Pakcharoong, the vice president of the Wat Pha Luang Ta Bua Temple Foundation, told CNN that the temple would comply with the court order but the relocation of the tigers would have a negative impact on the local economy.
"There is nothing illegal and dangerous at all," said Pakcharoong. "If they do like this, it would affect the tourism industry."
Tigers in the wild increase for first time in 100 years
Questionable conditions
Thai authorities have long been under pressure to stop the business.
"We have been receiving complaints from tourists they were attacked by tigers while walking them at the temple," said Noochdumrong. "We had warned them to stop this act; they didn't listen."
As part of a 2001 agreement with the WCO, the temple was allowed to take care of the tigers as long as it didn't use them for profit or breed them.
However, the tigers were also allowed to breed freely, and many of them suffer from chronic illnesses and blindness, according to WCO.

*This image is copyright of its original author
The temple's tigers seen playing with a water bottle. The sanctuary had received criticism over the welfare of the animals.
"We'd make the same decision," zoo director says of Harambe the gorilla shooting
The temple also charged tourists to enter the compound and walk with the big cats, however Pakcharoong said the money was used to pay for the tigers' care.
"We have to do that because that is how we earn the money and use that money to take care and raise our tigers," said Pakcharoong



RE: Bigcats News - Sully - 06-02-2016

Our false hope all but confirmed


http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/nagpur/First-quarter-of-2016-breaks-15-yr-record-of-tiger-poaching/articleshow/52528263.cms


RE: Bigcats News - sanjay - 06-02-2016

Another shocking news from tiger temple
Bodies of 40 tiger cubs found in Thai temple freezer

tiger cubs found dead in freezer
*This image is copyright of its original author


tiger temple tiger cubs found dead
*This image is copyright of its original author


BANGKOK (AP) — Forty dead tiger cubs were found Wednesday in a freezer at a Buddhist temple that operated as an admission-charging zoo, a national parks official said.

The discovery happened while authorities were removing mostly full-grown live tigers from the temple in western Kanchanaburi province following accusations that monks were involved in illegal breeding and trafficking of the animals.

Read full story on https://in.news.yahoo.com/bodies-40-tiger-cubs-found-thai-temple-freezer-093907472.html


RE: Bigcats News - brotherbear - 06-02-2016

Nice find of a horrible tragedy Sanjay.