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RE: Bigcats News - Pckts - 02-23-2016

The Madhya Pradesh government wants cameras installed in tigers' dens so tourists can have a closer look at the life of the big cat in the wild. The move is a part of its efforts to promote tourism through participation of private sector in wildlife conservation in forest areas outside national parks and sanctuaries.

The state has made a presentation to officials of the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change and other departments involved in wildlife conservation. It has proposed to create secure habitat for dispersal of tiger and to develop eco-tourism in degraded forest land through Public-Private Partnership (PPP) models and to have restaurants and picnic areas inside them.

http://www.ibnlive.com/news/india/madhya-pradesh-government-proposes-cameras-in-tigers-den-to-promote-tourism-1205761.html


RE: Bigcats News - Apollo - 02-24-2016







RE: Bigcats News - Dr Panthera - 02-24-2016

(02-02-2016, 01:04 AM)Spalea Wrote: @ PCKTS:

Yes ! What a great news !

I remind to have reading an account about lions and hyenas battle in Ethopia almost twenty years ago. Via this account I learnt that lions always existed in this country.

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/690226/Ethiopian-battles-leave-30-hyenas-and-6-lions-dead.html?pg=all

Ethiopia is a lion strong hold, there are between 1000 and 1500 lions there, the good news is that some lions are moving to South Sudan and begin establishing breeding populations there.
The lion status in South Sudan is not well studied but the presence of over one million Nile lechwes, 300,000 topis, and other large ungulates will ensure a large lion population provided adequate conservation measures are taken.
Reports of lions also come from Darfur (west) and Central Sudan.
And yes that lion-hyena battle is the most spectacular large predator battle known.


RE: Bigcats News - Pckts - 02-24-2016

We've got another "mover" on our hands just like Jai before him.

Feb 24 2016 : The Times of India (Mumbai)

Tadoba tiger walks 140km in 2nd-longest migration
Vijay Pinjarkar

Nagpur:






A tiger from Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve (TATR) in Chandrapur district traversed over 140km to reach Navegaon-Nagzira Tiger Reserve (NNTR) in Bhandara and Gondia districts in Maharashtra.
This is perhaps the second longest migration of a tiger in the last seven years from one protected area to another in Central India.
In 2008, a radio-collared tigress from Kanha in Madhya Pradesh had traversed 250km in four months to reach Pench (Maharashtra).
Maharashtra's principal chief conservator of forests for wildlife Shree Bhagwan said, “I have been told by scientists of Wildlife Institute of India (WII), Dehradun, that a tiger cub from Kolsa was photo captured for the first time along with two other siblings in April 2014.In a 2015 camera trap exercise, the animal's presence was not recorded in TATR. Then on January 17, 2016, the same tiger was recorded in New Nagzira.“
“The tiger dispersal simply explains why corridors are vital and highlights the need for protection. Such data will allow identification of new habitats and help in upgrading protection status of these areas. Such information is important for mana gement and conservation, and strengthen the argument for protecting remaining potential tiger habi tats,“ Bhagwan told TOI.
CCF and field director of TATR GP Garad, too, confirmed that the newly recorded tiger in New Nagzira is from Kolsa. “The cub was captured with the tigress and its other siblings from both Mo harli and Kolsa ranges. The tigress and these cubs were active in the area till 2015,“ said Garad.
The tiger was recorded in New Nagzira on January 17, 2016. NNTR comprising Koka, Navegaon, Nagzira and New Nagzira has presence of eight tigers, but the one recorded in camera traps in New Nagzira was not among them.“It is a new entrant. We cross-checked with adjoining Bhandara division and later Pench and Kanha reserves, but officials said it was not from their area,“ said NNTR officials.
Finally, the picture was forwarded to Tadoba field director, who got it scientifically verified from WII.

*This image is copyright of its original author


http://epaperbeta.timesofindia.com/Article.aspx?eid=31804&articlexml=Tadoba-tiger-walks-140km-in-2nd-longest-migration-24022016012021


RE: Bigcats News - Pckts - 02-26-2016


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The South China Tiger Is Functionally Extinct. This Banker Has 19 of Them
Stuart Bray brawls with everyone—including his wife—to save the South China tiger from extinction.
By Kit Chellel | February 23, 2016
Photographs by David Chancellor
From
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http://www.bloomberg.com/features/2016-stuart-bray-south-china-tigers/


Basically this guy is trying to teach them to be wild so he can hopefully re-introduce the now extinct South China tiger back to the wild...

"A 4-year-old male called 327 arrived in 2007. He was used to life in zoos and never got comfortable outside. “You could see by the way he walked,” Bray says. Finally, 327 found his mojo by mating with one of the females; then, pumped up with macho pride, he picked a fight with another male and lost. His skeleton is mounted in a glass case in the reserve lodge."

*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Bigcats News - Apollo - 02-28-2016

'I heard a roar and a growl': Dutch tourist survives tiger attack in Nepal


Gerard Van Laar managed to evade the tiger by climbing a tree while his guide was injured while trying to lure the big cat away


*This image is copyright of its original author


A Dutch tourist who survived a tiger attack in the jungles of south-west Nepal by climbing a tree over the weekend said on Monday he was lucky to be alive.

Gerard Van Laar, who has been travelling in Nepal since last month, said he was attacked by the tiger when he and his Nepalese guide were hiking in Bardia national park on Saturday.


“I was super lucky to be alive. I would have been dead if it had not been for Krishna [his guide],” Laar told the Associated Press by telephone from Bardia, about 400km (250 miles) south-west of the capital, Kathmandu.

“All of a sudden I heard a roar and a growl, and the tiger was heading toward us at full speed,” he said.

Laar was able to escape by climbing a tree but his guide was attacked and slightly injured as he ran away to draw the attention of the tiger.

The tiger returned and circled the tree while Laar tried to stay as quiet as possible about six metres (20ft) above the ground. About two hours later the guide arrived back with help and they shouted and used sticks to drive away the tiger.

The guide was hospitalised for a day but Laar was not hurt.

The 33-year-old freelance engineer from Dedemsvaart, Netherlands, said he thought he would be killed until he was able to climb the tree.
Bardia in south-west Nepal is a protected national forest which is home to about 70 tigers. It is popular and receives thousands of visitors a years, but tiger attacks are rare.



http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/feb/15/i-heard-a-roar-and-a-growl-dutch-tourist-survives-tiger-attack-in-nepal


RE: Bigcats News - Pckts - 03-02-2016

See What's Inside This Grisly Warehouse of Wildlife Trafficking

A government warehouse filled with seized endangered species offers grim evidence of the scale of the illegal wildlife trade. 


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These illegally trafficked leopard and tiger heads make up one of the macabre sights at the National Eagle and Wildlife Property Repository, a warehouse in Denver, Colorado, that houses illegal wildlife products.

Photograph by Brennan Linsley, AP


9






By Scott Wallace

PUBLISHED Tue Mar 01 07:00:00 EST 2016
Just outside Denver in the shadow of the Rocky Mountains, a beige warehouse stands on the site of a former chemical weapons facility. The building looks unremarkable, but inside it is the largest, most mind-numbing collection ever assembled of wild animals killed to make furniture, coats, upholstery, handbags, carved figurines, and mounted trophy heads.
It’s called the National Eagle and Wildlife Property Repository, but you could think of it instead as the “international museum of wildlife trafficking”—a grim testament to the business of slaughter for profit.  
More on Wildlife Crime


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Within its 16,000-square-foot (1,486 square meters) confines are 1.5 million specimens, mostly products made from some of the world’s most critically endangered mammals and reptiles—tigers, rhinos, sea turtles, crocodiles, elephants. Row upon row of metal shelves hold everything from intricately crafted ivory statuettes to cobra-skin boots in children’s sizes. An entire row of shelves 50 feet long and 10 feet high is dedicated to the hides and mounted heads of big cats—cheetahs, tigers, jaguars, margays, ocelots, leopards.
There’s no other place like it in the country, and there may be no other place that rivals its scale in the world.
The repository is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the agency responsible for enforcing federal laws that protect fish, wildlife, migratory birds, and their natural habitats around the country.
The service is also tasked with assuring that the U.S. complies with the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, the treaty that regulates commerce of wildlife to ensure the survival of threatened species. It is largely a result of U.S. efforts to enforce the treaty—and to maintain transparency around those efforts—that trafficked specimens end up here.


Everything in the repository has been seized during customs searches at U.S. ports of entry or while being trafficked across state lines. The stated purpose of the warehouse is to receive, inventory, and legally dispose of confiscated wildlife property to ensure “100 percent accountability.”

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Seized elephant tusks and ivory carvings represent countless slaughtered elephants.

Photograph by Alex Hofford, EPA/Corbis

Personnel at the facility are also responsible for developing educational programs about the wildlife trade, endangered species, and conservation laws. Some of the forfeited items are donated to schools and nonprofit organizations to help raise awareness of the scope of the calamity. 
“Sheer Greed”
“Some humans are capable of driving a species to extinction out of sheer greed,” says Steve Oberholtzer, the service’s special agent in charge of the repository as well as of law enforcement operations in an eight-state region across the Rocky Mountains and High Plains. “Wherever there’s money to be made, there are those who will break the rules to make it.”
Each specimen—this zebra-skin divan, that polar bear rug, those bags containing thousands of dried sea horses—arrives here after the case that led to its confiscation has been adjudicated.
Despite the staggering haul on display, says repository supervisor Coleen Schaefer with a sigh, “This is just the tip of the iceberg of what comes into the country. But it gives you a sense of the scale of the illegal wildlife trade.”
New specimens show up daily. Recently, a large wooden crate arrived containing the head of a black rhinoceros, its horn intact. Details of the case behind it are sketchy. For Schaefer, that rhino trophy amounts to evidence of a powerful threat—not only to creatures of the wild but also to the rule of law.


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The repository holds more than a million illegal wildlife products confiscated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
 
Photograph by Kate Brooks, Redux


“Environmental crimes used to be mostly crimes of opportunity, but now they’re highly structured, the perpetrators well armed and well organized,” she says. “People are making millions of dollars off endangered species. It’s not just conservationists who need to be concerned. This is a global security issue.”
In recognition of the emerging threat posed by wildlife traffickers, the Fish and Wildlife Service has posted agents in five countries overseas, three in Africa. “The extent of the poaching is so vast,” Oberholtzer says, “it’s having a destabilizing effect on entire regions.”
Scott Wallace, a regular contributor to National Geographic, is the author of  The Unconquered: In Search of the Amazon's Last Uncontacted Tribes. Follow him on his website  and on Twitter.
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/03/160301-usfws-cites-endangered-species-wildlife-trafficking-lacey-act-rhinos-elephants-ivory/?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=Social&utm_content=link_fb20160301news-wildlifewarehouse&utm_campaign=Content&sf21776305=1


RE: Bigcats News - Pckts - 03-02-2016


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It is a widely known fact that tigers, specifically Bengal tigers, are facing the threat of extinction. So it comes as terrible news that one tigress was shot dead in Nagaland on Monday. 
On Monday, the tigress, who had entered Medziphema Village, 30 km away from Dimapur, was killed. According to reports, one person was attacked on Monday morning by the tiger and the people, in self defence were forced to shoot the tiger.
The district administration confirmed the news and said the tigeress seriously wounded a man and killed two pigs and a cow after it entered the village on Friday night. The locals said, ‘We had no intention to kill the animal but scare and chase it away. Unfortunately, shots were fired to save the youth.’ 


It is believed that the dead tigeress was a Bengal tigeress. It was handed over to Wildlife Warden Dimapur Division for disposal, ADC Medziphema said. They will dispose the tiger after necessary formalities and post-mortem in the presence of a magistrate. ADC said that the Wildlife department officials rushed to the spot to take stock of the situation.  

Read the entire post here.


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Horrific. Villagers In Nagaland Kill The First Royal Bengal Tiger Spotted In The State, Parade Carcass


Nagaland : The villagers of Medziphema on Monday killed a tiger inside the nearby forests covering the village. Since last week, the tiger had mauled a resident of the village and killed livestock, according to the villagers.
On Monday morning the Medziphema village council gathered the village youths and send them off to the jungles “to chase off the tiger.” They reiterated that their intention was not to kill the animal but only to chase it away.
However, the tiger had reportedly attacked the group of youths which forced them to fire in retaliation and kill it. The corpse of the tiger was brought to the village council hall at around 4 pm. The state Forest department has taken possession of the tiger’s corpse, it was informed.

http://www.indiatimes.com/news/india/horrific-villagers-in-nagaland-kill-the-first-royal-bengal-tiger-spotted-in-the-state-parade-carcass-251428.html


RE: Bigcats News - Pckts - 03-03-2016

Orang now a tiger reserve

- Park to get more incentives 

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Jorhat, March 1: The Rajiv Gandhi Orang National Park, the smallest national park in Assam, has been declared a tiger reserve. Assam now has four tiger reserves, the other three being Manas, Kaziranga and Nameri.
India has 49 tiger reserves.
A notification issued by the state government a few days back stated that in view of the approval accorded by the National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA), the governor of Assam, in exercise of the powers conferred under Section 38V(1) of the Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972, is pleased to declare Orang a tiger reserve.
The development will ensure that the park gets the much-deserved additional incentives in the form of project allowance and other welfare measures for monitoring of tigers and their prey more effectively and independently for a long-term viability of the species.
Twenty-four tigers, including four cubs, were found at Orang National Park during a camera-trap census conducted in 2013.
The State Board for Wildlife, Assam, had approved the proposal in 2014 and moved the NTCA to declare Orang a tiger reserve in 2015.
The 79.28 square km national park, spread over Darrang and Sonitpur districts, falls under Mangaldai wildlife division.
The tiger population of Orang has been facing the biggest threat from retaliatory killings by fringe villagers.
In the past 10 years, at least 13 tigers had been poisoned to death to avenge cattle depredation by tigers.
An NTCA report titled Status of Tigers, Co-predators and Prey in India, 2010, had underscored the significance of Orang-Kaziranga tiger corridor, stating that the Kaziranga tiger population is contiguous with that of the Orang which is connected through island systems of the Brahmaputra.
This is the single largest population in this landscape consisting of nearly 125 tigers.
Thus, the report had advocated connecting of the "stepping stones" between Orang and Kaziranga as a part of a long-term tiger conservation strategy.
"If Orang is notified as a tiger reserve, the Brahmaputra riverine tiger corridor between Orang and Kaziranga through Laokhowa-Burhachapori wildlife sanctuaries can be effectively secured by notifying it as the buffer of the proposed Orang tiger reserve," the report stated.
"This is a very good news for Orang. It will ensure that its boundaries are completely secure now through installation of solar-powered fence and high towers to avoid illegal cattle grazing in the park area as well as straying of tigers and consequent retaliatory killings," Sushil Kumar Daila, a conservator of forest, Mangaldai wildlife division, told this correspondent.
He said other major species of national park such as rhino, hog deer, wild buffalo, river dolphin, wild pig and elephant would be conserved in a much better way in a tiger reserve owing to strengthening of the protection measures and improvement of habitat.

http://www.telegraphindia.com/1160302/jsp/northeast/story_72292.jsp#.Vtczh-Y7DeF



Great News!


RE: Bigcats News - strana - 03-03-2016

(03-03-2016, 12:11 AM)Pckts Wrote: Orang now a tiger reserve

- Park to get more incentives 

*This image is copyright of its original author

Jorhat, March 1: The Rajiv Gandhi Orang National Park, the smallest national park in Assam, has been declared a tiger reserve. Assam now has four tiger reserves, the other three being Manas, Kaziranga and Nameri.
India has 49 tiger reserves.
A notification issued by the state government a few days back stated that in view of the approval accorded by the National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA), the governor of Assam, in exercise of the powers conferred under Section 38V(1) of the Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972, is pleased to declare Orang a tiger reserve.
The development will ensure that the park gets the much-deserved additional incentives in the form of project allowance and other welfare measures for monitoring of tigers and their prey more effectively and independently for a long-term viability of the species.
Twenty-four tigers, including four cubs, were found at Orang National Park during a camera-trap census conducted in 2013.
The State Board for Wildlife, Assam, had approved the proposal in 2014 and moved the NTCA to declare Orang a tiger reserve in 2015.
The 79.28 square km national park, spread over Darrang and Sonitpur districts, falls under Mangaldai wildlife division.
The tiger population of Orang has been facing the biggest threat from retaliatory killings by fringe villagers.
In the past 10 years, at least 13 tigers had been poisoned to death to avenge cattle depredation by tigers.
An NTCA report titled Status of Tigers, Co-predators and Prey in India, 2010, had underscored the significance of Orang-Kaziranga tiger corridor, stating that the Kaziranga tiger population is contiguous with that of the Orang which is connected through island systems of the Brahmaputra.
This is the single largest population in this landscape consisting of nearly 125 tigers.
Thus, the report had advocated connecting of the "stepping stones" between Orang and Kaziranga as a part of a long-term tiger conservation strategy.
"If Orang is notified as a tiger reserve, the Brahmaputra riverine tiger corridor between Orang and Kaziranga through Laokhowa-Burhachapori wildlife sanctuaries can be effectively secured by notifying it as the buffer of the proposed Orang tiger reserve," the report stated.
"This is a very good news for Orang. It will ensure that its boundaries are completely secure now through installation of solar-powered fence and high towers to avoid illegal cattle grazing in the park area as well as straying of tigers and consequent retaliatory killings," Sushil Kumar Daila, a conservator of forest, Mangaldai wildlife division, told this correspondent.
He said other major species of national park such as rhino, hog deer, wild buffalo, river dolphin, wild pig and elephant would be conserved in a much better way in a tiger reserve owing to strengthening of the protection measures and improvement of habitat.

http://www.telegraphindia.com/1160302/jsp/northeast/story_72292.jsp#.Vtczh-Y7DeF



Great News!

Great news indeed  !!
 A few days ago I wrote that I could not understand why Orang should not be upgraded to Tiger Reserve status !! 
But in my opinion, the fact that the budget for Project Tiger for the period 2016-17 was increased by nearly 80%  is  as good or even better news than that of Orang !!
I hope to see  Nandhaur Wildlife Sanctuary, with its 10-15 tigers and nice conditions ( very similar to Corbett) also in the list very soon !!


RE: Bigcats News - Pckts - 03-03-2016

You were absolutely right @strana


RE: Bigcats News - sanjay - 03-09-2016

A Prophet escape narrowly from being killed by Lions when he charges on them to prove God's power, fortunately the Game Rangers saved him.

Lion attacks a prophet in kruger national park
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Note the above image is just for demonstration purpose only (not from actual site of incident)

A Zion Christian Church prophet who was filled with the Holy Spirit recently ‘challenged’ a lion to do battle in the Kruger National Park.

Prophet Alec Ndiwane who is based in the Pretoria Soshanguve was with fellow church members in the Kruger National Park where they were watching animals.It is believed the prophet went into a trance and started to speak in tongues. Ahead of them was a lion pride busy eating their impala.

Read full story : http://thesoutherndaily.co.za/index.php/2016/03/07/prophet-attacks-lion-to-prove-gods-power-nearly-killed-saved-by-game-rangers/


RE: Bigcats News - Pckts - 03-09-2016

Somebody forgot to tell the wild lions that they are suppose to believe in his God... He got what he deserved.


RE: Bigcats News - Roflcopters - 03-09-2016





Tiger falls from a truck in Doha, Qatar and runs on the busy highway.


RE: Bigcats News - Dr Panthera - 03-09-2016

2 great news for tiger conservation:

1-Malaysia has effectively banned Sambar hunting for six years making the 1000 Malaysian Sambars fully available for the 300-350 Malaysian tigers, wild boar is not normally hunted by Muslim hunters ( the majority of Malaysians ), muntjac is plentiful so the major tiger prey base looks secure which bodes well for tigers.

2-The remote Chittagong Hills forests in Bangladesh seem to have healthy populations of sambar, gaur, and wild boar and 13 cm wide foot prints ( of tigers ) have been discovered to suggest a tiger population of about 15 adults ( M.Khan ) which is significant since there are only 2500 adult tigers left in the wild, every single tiger counts.