WildFact
Bigcats News - Printable Version

+- WildFact (https://wildfact.com/forum)
+-- Forum: Information Section (https://wildfact.com/forum/forum-information-section)
+--- Forum: Premier League (https://wildfact.com/forum/forum-premier-league)
+--- Thread: Bigcats News (/topic-bigcats-news)



RE: Bigcats News - Apollo - 01-15-2015

Tigress Kaani travels 70km, New Nagzira to Navegaon


Tigers are long-ranging animals, migrating from one protected area to another. In yet another recorded migration, a tigress named Kaani travelled almost 70km to reach Navegaon wildlife sanctuary from New Nagzira, crossing the busy NH6.

Both the PAs are now part of Navegaon-Nagzira Tiger Reserve (NNTR), though divided by the national highway.Quite a few migrations have been reported from Nagzira earlier too. In 2009, it was Prince, who travelled to Pench followed by another male Aayat, who moved along Balaghat-Kanha corridor in February 2013. During the same year, another male Jai reached Umred-Karhandla sanctuary, travelling 120km.

According to a latest study by honorary wildlife warden of Gondia Sawan Bahekar, Ankit Thakur, Chetan Jasani and Shashank Ladekar, with inputs from Wildlife Trust of India (WTI), Kaani (T6) was one of the three siblings born in October 2012 in New Nagzira to tigress named 'Alpha'. It was sighted in Navegaon on December 3.The tigress came to be known as Kaani, after her right eye turned squint due to an injury when she was six months old.

The cubs, one male and two females, were sighted for the first time in Gaikhuri of New Nagzira on May 1, 2013. Movement of the cubs with mother was mainly found in Gaikhuri and Bandarzara areas.

As the cubs turned 14-month-old the family was reported in adjoining Koka sanctuary in March 2014. T6 also moved along Koka-Chandrapur state highway. She was frequently sighted on the edges of Koka, may be trying to carve out a separate territory.

"Our group monitored T6 regularly. As the rainy season faded, Kaani moved forward to the north of Nagzira and was reported in adjoining forest of Mangezari, Govindtola and Junewani, which is an already recognized corridor for dispersal towards Kanha-Pench. T6 pugmarks were found during monitoring while she was in migration," says Bahekar.

He added some cattle kills were reported in this area from October 21 to November 4. Subsequently, T6 was reported in camera traps in compartment number 92 of Nagzira sanctuary on November 21."It was the first time she had travelled the long distance. Her movement was later observed towards Murdoli on state highway and was seen by some locals while crossing the highway late night on November 23," says Bahekar.

The local RFOs were alerted about T6 movement, with increase in patrolling. The wildcat then crossed Chulbandh and headed towards Jambhdi. Her pugmarks were traced in adjoining Jambhdi in a nullah of Umarzari dam.
On November 26, T6 moved to Ghisamari, which is considered the richest part of the corridor. Tiger scat was collected in this area after a few days.

As tiger movement was observed in Navegaon, officials installed camera traps and the tigress was captured on camera on December 3."We compared the camera trap pictures with available records and affirmed that T6 was a resident of New Nagzira now," said Sanjay Thawre, field director and conservator of forest of NNTR.Nagzira has often been in the news for missing tigers.

Even now, wildlife experts claimed that officials should not conclude that migration of tigers is an indication they are safe and are not being poached."The serious issue is when tigers can stay back with availability of 656 sq km forest area, why are they moving out of the park consistently?" they asked. As per official estimation, only six tigers have been reported this year in the tiger reserve.

 

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/nagpur/Tigress-Kaani-travels-70km-New-Nagzira-to-Navegaon/articleshow/45682108.cms


RE: Bigcats News - Pckts - 01-15-2015

Imagine how far tigers used to travel before human intervention. It makes me wonder if enough generations of tigers from india ever made the long trek to china or russia? I wonder if bengals and amurs ever lived in the same place or at least crossed path's.


RE: Bigcats News - Apollo - 01-16-2015

Tigers roar back, numbers show steady rise



*This image is copyright of its original author



The country’s tiger population has increased marginally and the numbers were stabilising in most of the protected habitats for big cats, indicating good tidings for the besieged kings of our jungles.

The total number of tigers in 2014 could be somewhere between 1,720 and 1,800 as compared to 1,706 four years ago, said top government sources quoting figures from a year-long survey which will go into the third tiger estimation report to be made public on January 20.

“The data from some tiger landscapes was still being collated and, therefore, we have not reached the final population figure for 2014. But, initial estimate show slight and not a significant increase in numbers,” said an official.

India has been struggling to hold on to its last few hundreds of big cats left in the wild because of rampant poaching that feeds an illegal international trade, which supplies animal parts to the traditional Chinese medicine market, and also habitat loss, prey depletion and poor management of tiger reserves.But conservation efforts have paid off.

The species breeds quickly wherever there is adequate prey and good protection measures are in place.Tiger population has been on an upswing since 2006 when it dipped to an alarming 1,411 from over 3,000 in early 2000, prompting the government to form a Tiger Task Force and tighten protection measures.

The increase between 2006 and 2010 didn’t reflect uniformly because only a handful of habitats — such as Corbett National Park in Uttarakhand, Kaziranga National Park in Assam and some reserves in southern India — supported a good population.The comforting roar was missing from Madhya Pradesh, which was once an undisputed tiger haven.

The country’s other popular tiger destinations, Rajasthan and Maharashtra, recorded a dip in numbers in some of their tiger reserves.Not for long though, as latest trends suggest.

“The decreasing trend has either reversed or stopped. There has not been a fall in tiger numbers in any landscape and most have witnessed some increase.

Many tiger reserves show a stable population near to its optimal capacity, some are moving in that direction and only a few have shown a slight dip,” the official said, describing Pilibhit in Uttar Pradesh and Bor in Maharashtra as habitats with some concern.

The country has five landscapes — Shivalik-Gangetic Plains, Central India and Eastern Ghats, Western Ghats, North-Eastern India and Sunderbans — for the tiger census that started in early 2013.

Beside the tiger headcount, the census provides useful data on other wildlife living alongside the big cats. Data is collected through camera trap, DNA tests and ground report from thousands of foresters scouring the wild.

The latest report could show a decline in tiger population outside its 47 protected areas the corridors connecting them are in a shambles. Less than 10% of the tiger population lives outside the protected zones — not a small number to be wished away considering so much little are left in India.

Over the past several years, the government has sanctioned projects in some of the corridors despite initial resistance by the National Tiger Reserve Authority.

 


http://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/tigers-roar-back-numbers-show-steady-rise/article1-1305497.aspx

 


RE: Bigcats News - Apollo - 01-18-2015

Two tiger cubs die of starvation


*This image is copyright of its original author


Two of the three tiger cubs abandoned by their mother were found dead in Nagarahole National Park on Thursday. Another cub has been shifted to Mysuru Zoo for treatment.

The condition of the cub is said to be normal. National park director R Gokul said the tiger cubs, aged about 6-8 months, died of starvation, in Dattahall beat in Metikuppe range.

Another cub was holed up inside a bush but we rescued it and relocated it to a rehab centre. All three cubs were still drinking milk from themother tigress which abandoned them .

 

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/mysuru/Two-tiger-cubs-die-of-starvation/articleshow/45907542.cms
 


RE: Bigcats News - Wanderfalke - 01-19-2015

Presence of the Endangered Amur tiger Panthera tigris altaica in Jilin Province, China, detected using non-invasive genetic techniques
http://www.panthera.org/sites/default/files/Caragiulo%20et%20al%202015%20copy.pdf


RE: Bigcats News - GuateGojira - 01-19-2015

Did you remember the tiger "sanctuaries" in China??? Well, check this out:

"China's Tiger Farms Are Driving Illegal Trade in Pelts and Tiger Bone Wine" Article here: https://news.vice.com/article/chinas-tiger-farms-are-driving-illegal-trade-in-pelts-and-tiger-bone-wine?utm_content=bufferc6eb5&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

This is what I am talking about, the hypocrite of the government of China is 100% clear.
 


RE: Bigcats News - Pckts - 01-19-2015

(12-28-2014, 04:56 AM)'Apollo' Wrote: No sign of Gir transfer, MP seeks to shift zoo lions to Kuno


A year after Madhya Pradesh won an eight-year legal battle with Gujarat government to translocate a few Gir lions to its Kuno-Palpur wildlife sanctuary, the Shivraj Singh Chouhan government seems to have given up hope of getting the prized predators and is now looking to have zoo lions from the south released into the sanctuary. 

The state government has decided to translocate Hyderabad-bred Asiatic lions to the Kuno reserve in Sheopur district, instead of waiting for the Gir lions, whose relocation was opposed by Narendra Modi when he was the chief minister of Gujarat. 

Gir is the only place in the world where the Asiatic lion survives in the wild. The idea behind the Kuno-Palpur project was to raise a buffer population of wild lions as an insurance against epidemics or natural disasters wiping out the Gir lions. 
 In August this year, the Gujarat government's curative petition against the shifting of Gir lions too was dismissed by the Supreme Court. 

As CM, Modi had refused to entertain any request from the Chouhan government to shift the lions till the apex court on April 15, 2013, set a six-month deadline to the environment ministry to relocate the predators to Kuno. The court held that the species was under the threat of extinction and needed a second home. But the court's order has not been followed. 

Government sources in Hyderabad told TOI that the MP forest department had approached them asking for pure breed Asiatic lions, bred in captivity, for the Kuno reserve. 

Asked about the move, state chief wildlife warden Narendra Kumar said, "It would be too early to comment." Other senior forest officers in the state, however, confirmed they have decided to shift lions from Hyderabad zoo to Madhya Pradesh. 

But the Kuno project might take time to kick off, following global concern over the recent death of the Asiatic lion pair — Lakshmi and Vishnu — at Etawah's lion safari in Uttar Pradesh. The two zoo-bred lions died within a month of relocation from Hyderabad, said sources. Both suffered 'multiple infections', including viral infection that caused paralysis. The Etawah safari was a pet project of the Samajwadi Party government, which started two months ago. The lions were brought to Kanpur zoo from Hyderabad in April, 2013, and shifted to Etawah safari in September 2014. 


*This image is copyright of its original author



In May, the MP government sent its second reminder to the Union ministry of environment and forests (MoEF) to take urgent measures to shift lions from Gujarat to Kuno. More reminders were sent to additional director general (ADG) wildlife, (MoEF), who heads the 12-member committee formed to execute the translocation. 

The move to relocate big cats, first mooted in 2000, had been hanging fire because Gujarat steadfastly refused to part with the majestic lions. 


Times View 

The reported move to release zoo-bred lions in the Kuno-Palpur sanctuary neither makes sense from the conservation standpoint nor would it be safe for the translocated animals. It's well documented that animals bred in captivity do not adapt well in the wild. Moreover, the idea behind Kuno-Palpur was to have a second home for Gir lions so that epidemics and natural disasters do not finish off this last surviving wild population of Asiatic lions. The Supreme Court has turned down Gujarat's curative plea against the transfer of Gir lions to the sanctuary. The MP government should be asking for the court's orders to be implemented, instead of thinking up such disastrous schemes.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Home/Environment/Flora-Fauna/No-sign-of-Gir-transfer-MP-seeks-to-shift-zoo-lions-to-Kuno/articleshow/45379624.cms

 

 

 
More political non sense getting in the way of actual conservation. Nothing but empty promises and posturing done by these "officials"


 


RE: Bigcats News - Apollo - 01-20-2015

(01-19-2015, 09:30 AM)'GuateGojira' Wrote: Did you remember the tiger "sanctuaries" in China??? Well, check this out:

"China's Tiger Farms Are Driving Illegal Trade in Pelts and Tiger Bone Wine" Article here: https://news.vice.com/article/chinas-tiger-farms-are-driving-illegal-trade-in-pelts-and-tiger-bone-wine?utm_content=bufferc6eb5&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

This is what I am talking about, the hypocrite of the government of China is 100% clear.
 


 



TIGERS STARVED IN CHINESE AND VIETNAMESE FARMS



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author





A story in the Shanghai Daily underlines the huge disconnect between the conservation lie China spins around its tiger breeding operations and the grim commercial truth behind them…

Fewer than 50 wild tigers remain in China, close to 10,000 are held captive on huge commercial tiger farms where they are bred and then killed to make tiger bone wine and other tonic products. For every one wild tiger alive in the world today, there are three “farmed” tigers in China. Farming tigers for trade creates market demand for dead tigers and motivates poachers throughout Asia to keep slaughtering these majestic creatures.

An estimated 800 to 1,000 tigers are born on tiger farms each year. In these farms the tigers live lives of imprisonment in rows of squalid sheds, sometimes in perpetual darkness. The cubs are separated from their mothers at three months old so the mothers can breed again to produce more tigers for the farms. At around one year old they are killed and their bodies taken apart to be distributed for commercial gain. The captive tigers are often kept in miserable and cramped conditions with very little, if any, monitoring to make sure the animals health and welfare is considered.

Behind rusted bars, skeletal tigers lie panting on filthy concrete cage floors, covered in sores and untreated wounds. The bodies are so emaciated that they are little more than pitiful piles of fur and bones dying slowly from neglect and starvation. Death actually can come as a welcome release. [Source: Youth for Wildlife]



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author




Harbin, 14 March 2014 – Xinhua: The world’s largest breeding center for Siberian tigers in northeast China’s Heilongjiang Province plans to increase its population by 100 Siberian tiger cubs this year, sources with the center said on Friday …

The country has been trying to save the species through active breeding programs. The Heilongjiang center has bred more than 1,000 Siberian tigers since its establishment in 1986, when it had just eight of the large cats.

EIA Wildlife Campaigner Shruti Suresh responds: “Tiger farms and smaller facilities in China hold more than 5,000 – 6,000 tigers and counting in captivity, along with an extensive ‘stockpile’ of tiger carcasses, skins and bones.

“The announcement made by one of China’s largest tiger farms is not only a flagrant violation of international law and policy, but is wholly unscientific and ludicrous.

“Under CITES, China is required to ensure that tigers are not bred on a commercial scale and that action is taken by tiger farms in China (such as through segregation of sexes) so that the existing massive captive tiger population in China does not grow any further.

“Further, it is obvious that the centre/tiger farm in questions does not understand the scientific meaning of conservation breeding.

“There is no doubt that these tigers are NOT bred for conservation purposes. Indeed, EIA investigations have found that captive tigers in China are bred and kept for commercial reasons – specifically for the lucrative trade in their skins and bones.

” It’s already too late for the Balinese tiger and this is the only picture in existence:



*This image is copyright of its original author



The global population of tigers has fallen nearly 97% in the last century so that now there are thought be only 2,500 tigers left in the whole world. Of the 9 sub-species of tiger, 3 are already extinct, and all of the remaining 6 sub-species are now endangered, some critically so.

Tigers are forced to compete for space with dense human populations, face unrelenting pressure from poachers, suffer retaliatory or trophy killings and experience habitat loss across their ranges. All tigers, no matter where they live, seem to be under attack and threats against them continue to mount. There were once 9 subspecies of tigers, but today there are only 6 remaining…the Royal Bengal, Indo-Chinese, Siberian (also called Amur), Malayan, South China and Sumatran. The Bali, Caspian, and Javan tigers are now extinct. The world’s forests are lost at a rate of 36 football fields per minute, according to the World Wildlife Federation. This extensive habitat loss has forced wild tigers to live in small, isolated areas of their remaining habitat, making it harder for them to reproduce. Increased road networks also leaves them more vulnerable to the wrath of poachers and overhunting of tiger prey species
 


*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author





*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Bigcats News - Pckts - 01-20-2015

 Sanctuary Asia at Bandhavgarh National Park9 hrs · Edited ·India's 2014 tiger estimation numbers declared.For a change we have positive news on the tiger front. Based on rigorous protocols established in consultation with some of the finest field biologists both in and out of government, the official tiger estimation for the year 2014 is now 2,226 tigers, up by over 30 per cent over the 2010 figure of 1,706.
The task before India now is to expand, regenerate and protect the buffer lands abutting the best tiger habitats, and the connecting corridors that link tiger reserves, so that dispersing male and female tigers are able to find territories in which to bring up their own families. You could follow the Indian tiger's roller coaster ride through the links on this page: http://bit.ly/India2014TigerEstimationImage: Steve Winter


Nice to see a little good news for a change.


RE: Bigcats News - Wanderfalke - 01-21-2015

Never seen such a high quality color picture of that famous caspian tiger photo 0_0. Big thanks Apollo!!!

 


RE: Bigcats News - GuateGojira - 01-21-2015

In fact, I published that picture before in AVA, in the Extinction topic, where Peter also presented other captive Caspian tigers.

Here is the image, in a large version:

*This image is copyright of its original author


Save it for future uses.

 


RE: Bigcats News - Apollo - 01-23-2015

 
UP plans 4th tiger reserve, may get big cats from Panna

Uttar Pradesh may soon get its fourth tiger reserve, thanks to big cats strolling into the state from Madhya Pradesh's Panna reserve.

The state government has proposed to develop Ranipur wildlife sanctuary in Chitrakoot (Bundelkhand region) into a tiger reserve, given its proximity to Panna. The two reserves are located at a distance of 150km along the UP-MP border. Ranipur doesn't have any tiger, but the ones from Pannakeep frequenting the sanctuary.

Tiger pugmarks are regularly found at Ranipur."If the place is developed as a separate tiger reserve, it might get some of these stray tigers finding their territories at Ranipur," said a UP forest department source, adding the final decision would be taken by the National Tiger Conservation Authority and the National Board of Wildlife.

At present, UP has 100-odd tigers in three tiger reserves at Lakhimpur (884sq.km Dudhwa reserve), Pilibhit (720sq.km) and Bijnor (80sq.km Amangarh reserve).While these reserves are tiger-dominant areas, 250sq.km Ranipur sanctuary has no 'resident' tigers.

The sanctuary, though, has a large antelope population comprising 'chausinghas, chinkara, sloth bear, black bucks and leopards.Ranipur is not a popular wildlife sanctuary and does not attract enough tourists because of its difficult access.

But proximity to Panna and being developed as a tiger reserve can help draw tourists.

Besides, tiger reserve status will fetch it additional funds under Project Tiger, a worked-out wildlife management plan and central assistance to boost security and technical know-how in the sanctuary.The other wildlife sanctuaries in Bundelkhand eco-tourism circuit like Vijaysagar and Mahavir Swamy too will gain from Ranipur's enhanced status.

 

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/environment/flora-fauna/UP-plans-4th-tiger-reserve-may-get-big-cats-from-Panna/articleshow/45927020.cms
 


RE: Bigcats News - Apollo - 01-26-2015

 
Six Katarniaghat tigers find home in Berdia park

UP tigers are not only making their presence felt in populated areas like Lucknow and Kanpur, they are also crossing over to Nepal. Camera trappings have revealed that six tigers of Katarniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary had crossed over to Nepal and made Royal Berdia National Park their home.

Alarmed over the 'loss', forest officials have written to their Nepalese counterparts for security of these big cats. Katarniaghat reserved forest area is known for its tiger population. Bahraich's reserved forest area connects with 60-km-long reserved forest area of Nepal leading to the Royal Berdia National Park in Himalayan kingdom. Elephants, rhinos and other wild animal often cross over to Katarniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary from Nepal through this forest corridor. Now, the movement of tigers too has come to light.

The Indian Wildlife Institute, Dehradun, officials detected the movement during a routine tallying of camera trapping records of Nepal and believe that the six big cats crossed over to Nepal through the forest corridor. In the 2010 tiger Census, 32 tigers were identified in Katarniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary and their pictures were recorded through thermo sensor cameras. However, the numbers dwindled to 21 in 2012 Census and 24 in 2014.

As questions about 'vanishing' tigers cropped up, experts of the Indian Wildlife Institute sought records of camera trapping done in Nepal by joint efforts of Nepal forest department and World Wildlife Fund (WWF). "A thorough study of records revealed startling facts. The pictures of six tigers captured in thermo-sensor cameras in Katarniaghat sanctuary in 2010 matched with records of Royal Berdia National Park," said WWF project officer DabeerHasan.

"Although movement of tigers is common n forested areas, this is the first instance that Katarniaghat tigers have reached Nepal," he said. "There is nothing to worry, a letter has been sent to Nepal's forest officials to ensure safety of Indian tigers," he added. Hasan said that the 20-km region between Katarniaghat wildlife sanctuary and Royal Berdia National park has dense forest cover.

"This area is sensitive for tigers. Indian tigers roaming in Nepal forest can return anytime. We have already alerted residents of villages around the forest," he added. Divisional forest officer (DFO) AshishTiwari confirmed that Katarniaghat tigers had crossed over to Royal Berdia park. "A tiger occupies a territory of 15 to 20kms.

Shifting of tigers is nothing new. However, we are in regular touch with our Nepal counterparts for updates on safety of these big cats. " Hasan said that movement of Katarniaghat tigers has increased drastically in the last one to two years. "North Kheri and Berdia park forests are directly connected with Katarniaghat corridor. Hence, we must conduct camera trapping on regular basis.

A letter for the same has also been sent to the Union forest and environment ministry," he added. Tigers had created scare after making rural pockets of Lucknow and Kanpur their haunt. They are yet to be captured.

 

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/allahabad/Six-Katarniaghat-tigers-find-home-in-Berdia-park/articleshow/45997053.cms

 


RE: Bigcats News - Apollo - 01-29-2015

 
Indian-origin man arrested in Nepal with tiger bones and pistols

 A 23-year-old Indian-origin man has been arrested in Nepal for allegedly carrying a tiger hide, bones and two pistols. The suspect identified as Anuj Kumar Pandey was arrested yesterday from Lakhimpur district in Nepal.A police team deployed from the Far-Western Regional Office, Dipayal, under the command of Sub Inspector Birendra Johar, apprehended Pandey from Baishakha area in Belauri-1.

The team seized an eight-feet-long and 2.3 inch-wide tiger hide, 19 kg bones and twopistols from his possession.Police said that Pandey has been handed over to the District Forest Office to conduct further investigation.

 
http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report-indian-origin-man-arrested-in-nepal-with-tiger-bones-and-pistols-2054234

 


RE: Bigcats News - stoja9 - 01-29-2015

(01-20-2015, 12:26 PM)Apollo Wrote:
(01-19-2015, 09:30 AM)'GuateGojira' Wrote: Did you remember the tiger "sanctuaries" in China??? Well, check this out:

"China's Tiger Farms Are Driving Illegal Trade in Pelts and Tiger Bone Wine" Article here: https://news.vice.com/article/chinas-tiger-farms-are-driving-illegal-trade-in-pelts-and-tiger-bone-wine?utm_content=bufferc6eb5&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

This is what I am talking about, the hypocrite of the government of China is 100% clear.
 


 



TIGERS STARVED IN CHINESE AND VIETNAMESE FARMS



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author





A story in the Shanghai Daily underlines the huge disconnect between the conservation lie China spins around its tiger breeding operations and the grim commercial truth behind them…

Fewer than 50 wild tigers remain in China, close to 10,000 are held captive on huge commercial tiger farms where they are bred and then killed to make tiger bone wine and other tonic products. For every one wild tiger alive in the world today, there are three “farmed” tigers in China. Farming tigers for trade creates market demand for dead tigers and motivates poachers throughout Asia to keep slaughtering these majestic creatures.

An estimated 800 to 1,000 tigers are born on tiger farms each year. In these farms the tigers live lives of imprisonment in rows of squalid sheds, sometimes in perpetual darkness. The cubs are separated from their mothers at three months old so the mothers can breed again to produce more tigers for the farms. At around one year old they are killed and their bodies taken apart to be distributed for commercial gain. The captive tigers are often kept in miserable and cramped conditions with very little, if any, monitoring to make sure the animals health and welfare is considered.

Behind rusted bars, skeletal tigers lie panting on filthy concrete cage floors, covered in sores and untreated wounds. The bodies are so emaciated that they are little more than pitiful piles of fur and bones dying slowly from neglect and starvation. Death actually can come as a welcome release. [Source: Youth for Wildlife]



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author




Harbin, 14 March 2014 – Xinhua: The world’s largest breeding center for Siberian tigers in northeast China’s Heilongjiang Province plans to increase its population by 100 Siberian tiger cubs this year, sources with the center said on Friday …

The country has been trying to save the species through active breeding programs. The Heilongjiang center has bred more than 1,000 Siberian tigers since its establishment in 1986, when it had just eight of the large cats.

EIA Wildlife Campaigner Shruti Suresh responds: “Tiger farms and smaller facilities in China hold more than 5,000 – 6,000 tigers and counting in captivity, along with an extensive ‘stockpile’ of tiger carcasses, skins and bones.

“The announcement made by one of China’s largest tiger farms is not only a flagrant violation of international law and policy, but is wholly unscientific and ludicrous.

“Under CITES, China is required to ensure that tigers are not bred on a commercial scale and that action is taken by tiger farms in China (such as through segregation of sexes) so that the existing massive captive tiger population in China does not grow any further.

“Further, it is obvious that the centre/tiger farm in questions does not understand the scientific meaning of conservation breeding.

“There is no doubt that these tigers are NOT bred for conservation purposes. Indeed, EIA investigations have found that captive tigers in China are bred and kept for commercial reasons – specifically for the lucrative trade in their skins and bones.

” It’s already too late for the Balinese tiger and this is the only picture in existence:



*This image is copyright of its original author



The global population of tigers has fallen nearly 97% in the last century so that now there are thought be only 2,500 tigers left in the whole world. Of the 9 sub-species of tiger, 3 are already extinct, and all of the remaining 6 sub-species are now endangered, some critically so.

Tigers are forced to compete for space with dense human populations, face unrelenting pressure from poachers, suffer retaliatory or trophy killings and experience habitat loss across their ranges. All tigers, no matter where they live, seem to be under attack and threats against them continue to mount. There were once 9 subspecies of tigers, but today there are only 6 remaining…the Royal Bengal, Indo-Chinese, Siberian (also called Amur), Malayan, South China and Sumatran. The Bali, Caspian, and Javan tigers are now extinct. The world’s forests are lost at a rate of 36 football fields per minute, according to the World Wildlife Federation. This extensive habitat loss has forced wild tigers to live in small, isolated areas of their remaining habitat, making it harder for them to reproduce. Increased road networks also leaves them more vulnerable to the wrath of poachers and overhunting of tiger prey species
 


*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author





*This image is copyright of its original author



Ugh. My stomach just churned. How utterly disgusting. Humanity sickens me.