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Bigcats News - Printable Version

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RE: Bigcats News - GuateGojira - 06-19-2014

(06-18-2014, 10:57 PM)'sanjay' Wrote: Great Work By Tiger Time
Tiger tracking and Counting in Kaziranga by Tiger Time, A campaign of David Shepherd wildlife foundation

As part of the All India Tiger Monitoring (AITM) programme the teams that TigerTime and our loyal supporters fund in Assam have been busy counting tigers. Counting and measuring pugmarks (tiger pawprints) is now a thing of the past and instead the teams set up camera traps around the national parks. Placed on either side of a path or between trees the cameras are triggered when an animal breaks the infrared beams and is photographed from both sides. This is important as tigers have different stripe patterns on either flank so to build up a true picture of tiger numbers and to identify individuals two pictures work best. =16pxThe traps also record prey species and occasionally poachers. 

These pictures show some amazing images of the beautiful tigers that live in Kaziranga, a UNESCO World Heritage Site on the banks of the Bramaputra River and which, through your donations we are helping to protect.

The team are currently inputting the data and we'll have more information on tiger numbers soon. For now, simply enjoy!

You can find out more about our work in Kaziranga which includes monitoring, anti-poaching, wildlife crime investigation and community outreach by clicking here.

Please help us continue our important work to protect the tigers of Assam by making a donation here. Thank you


*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author


 
These Kaziranga tigers are very light in color. The first one remember me an Amur tiger in coloration. Maybe is just the light and shadow effect, but even then, it is interesting to see this.



 


RE: Bigcats News - sanjay - 06-19-2014

(06-19-2014, 09:32 PM)'GuateGojira' Wrote: These Kaziranga tigers are very light in color. The first one remember me an Amur tiger in coloration. Maybe is just the light and shadow effect, but even then, it is interesting to see this.

 

See the landscape behind and the grasses. This is light effect

 


RE: Bigcats News - Pckts - 06-19-2014

What do you think. Bury or burn this tigress with honour or skin her!? Rajasthan to immortalize world's most photographed tigress-
After Machli's death, it has been requested by the concerned departments to retrieve the cat's skin and make a life size incarnation of her.
DNA-June 18, 2014 (Source)


*This image is copyright of its original author

http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report-rajasthan-to-immortalise-world-s-most-photographed-tigress-1996299

 


RE: Bigcats News - sanjay - 06-19-2014

I feel very sad reading this news. The legendary tigress at her last days.
I think they should think of some other kind of tribute for this lady. May be renaming some places after her name.


RE: Bigcats News - Apollo - 06-19-2014

(06-19-2014, 10:35 PM)'Pckts' Wrote: What do you think. Bury or burn this tigress with honour or skin her!? Rajasthan to immortalize world's most photographed tigress-
After Machli's death, it has been requested by the concerned departments to retrieve the cat's skin and make a life size incarnation of her.
DNA-June 18, 2014 (Source)


*This image is copyright of its original author

http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report-rajasthan-to-immortalise-world-s-most-photographed-tigress-1996299

 

 



IMO we should do 3 things for her
1) skin her body and make a life size incarnation.
2) Bury her remaining body and build a memorial.
3) Since she is the Lady or Queen of the lake, rename the lake as "Machali lake".
 


RE: Bigcats News - Apollo - 06-20-2014

Rajasthan to immortalise world's most photographed tigress


At 18 years, Machli has lived past her prime and is not in the best of her health

The world's most photographed tigress from the Ranthambore National park, T-16, popularly known as Machli, is all set to be immortalised. 



*This image is copyright of its original author



At eighteen years, Machli has lived past her prime and is not in the best of her health as the forest officials tracking her have now started to realise.After getting a stamp issued in her name, the department, fearing they could lose the most famous feline in the world forever, has taken an unprecedented step of keeping her alive even after her death.

The state forest department is seeking the National Tiger Conservation Authority's (NTCA) assent to allow it to retrieve the big cat's skin upon its demise so that the animal can be preserved and its life-size incarnation can then be put up before the world as a trophy to Machli's glorious history.dna has reliably learnt that the chief wildlife warden has written a letter to the NTCA. 

"If the consent is given, the body of the animal will be retrieved after it dies which will be sent to a taxidermist who will take out the skin and make a trophy of the tigress. The trophy will then be put up on display so that the visitors can see and learn about Machli," officials told dna.

Sources in the wildlife park said Machli's movements are now being tracked 24X7. "We have been asked to retrieve her skin in one piece the event of her death. It is essential for us to know her whereabouts as the maggots eat into the flesh and destroy the skin within 24 hours of a feline's death," an official said.

The forest department's anxiety has been accentuated by the fact that a young T-24 that had taken over Machli's territory has now also started claiming her kills in the area, forcing her into the periphery of her original territory.The tigress once reigned supreme in the woods of Ranthambhore National Park, where her territory stretched over the three main lakes inside the national park. 

The department officials credit her with more than fifty percent of the tiger population of Sariska and Ranthambore National Park.However, old age has caught up with the tigress, which at eighteen years, is nearly four years more than the average age of a tiger that lives in the wild.

A few months back, the tigress had vanished from the park sending the department into tizzy, with many believing that she could well have been dead. "Her pugmarks could not be seen anywhere, leave alone being sighted. Two dozen camera traps were installed at strategic locations in the tiger territory and teams of over 200 officials patrolled the park since Machli went missing.

When everyone thought that the animal is dead, she appeared in her territory again," a highly placed department official recounted the incident."Her disappearance gave the idea to officials to give a chance to people to see the feline for time immemorial. This was when the department wrote to the NTCA. We are still awaitingconfirmation," the official said.

Interestingly, a round the clock surveillance is kept on the feline and forest guards are kept on duty to keep an eye on her every move so much so that they even know if the animal has had its fill of water for the day or not.



Interesting facts about Machli

* She is the most photographed tigress in the world.

* Half the population in Ranthmbhore and Sariska parks are of her lineageShe is also known as the "lady of the lake" since she    reigned over the water bodies of the jungle.

* She has been bestowed with a TOFT Lifetime Achievement Award for her contribution to Rajasthan.

* Her fight with 14-feet long crocodile is legendary, the encounter having been captured on camera.




http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report-rajasthan-to-immortalise-world-s-most-photographed-tigress-1996299


RE: Bigcats News - Apollo - 06-20-2014

Three tigers caught on camera in Tillari region


Maharashtra's forest department says it has used a camera trap technique to study the natural habitat as well as the movements of the big cat in the Tillari reservoir and succesfully captured images of three tigers.

The Tillari region, bordering Goa and Maharashtra, has a water reservoir nestled amidst lush green patches of forest with a thriving population of herbivorous animals favouring visits from carnivorous animals like tigers, leopards and other animals.Speaking to B S Shinde, range forest officer, Dodamarg forest range, Maharashtra, said "We got camera trap images of tigers Our authorities have told us to keep the information about the images confidential for the safety and security of the big cats. 

The tigers are in the region ranging from Chorla ghat in Karnataka and Goa to Kendre of Tillari. They come into this region due to the availability of ample food and water."Ramesh Kumar, deputy conservator of forests, Sawantwadi division said, "Our officials were successful in securing camera trap images of tigers in the area of the Tillari reservoir.

The images indicate the presence of three tigers."Recently a team of wildlife biologists under the Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund and Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment, supported by Centre for Wildlife Studies called for immediate intervention for protection and conservation of the tigers and other species of wild animals in the landscape spanning 6,000 sq km that is part of the Sahyadri-Konkan corridor.

This area covers the Koyna wildlife sanctuary, Chandoli national park and Radhanagri wildlife sanctuary along with the Tillari region as the rate of landscape modification and fragmentation is breaking forest contiguity and isolating protected areas for the large carnivores, the study found.

Using the same camera-trap method in 2013, through an initiative undertaken by range forest officer Paresh Porob, with a Wildlife Conservation Society-Bangalore (WCS) team, Goa's forest department captured images of a tigress relishing a wild boar in Dongurli inside the Mhadei wildlife sanctuary.

This year, Goa's forest department and WCS installed camera traps, but have not confirmed any results.The WCS team is currently engrossed in a camera trap project in the Bhimgad wildlife sanctuary, Karnataka



http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/goa/Three-tigers-caught-on-camera-in-Tillari-region/articleshow/36720926.cms







 


RE: Bigcats News - sanjay - 06-21-2014

From the Tiger Time blog - Kaziranga Tiger


*This image is copyright of its original author


 The tigers of Kaziranga in Assam are famous for a number of reasons; they are among the biggest in the Bengal tiger family and the most elusive. So, catching them on camera trap is usually the only way we get to see them … but sometimes, just sometimes, magic happens.

A few weeks ago the monitoring team that TigerTime helps fund set off on what they thought would be another routine ‘day in the office’. Binita, Munjali and Arif and their regular guard Mr Prodip Bora, set off to monitor the camera traps in the park and were soon welcomed by a one-horned Indian rhino mother and calf. Although extremely rare – Kaziranga is the last stronghold of the species – they can regularly be spotted grazing on the vast alluvium plains that make Kaziranga so rich in wildlife. Seeing the calf, however, was a real treat.

The team take up the story:

"We had already checked a few trap locations and downloaded the data from the cameras and, because of heavy rain the night, had to carry out some maintenance to the cameras too. At 11'o'clock, as we approached one of the anti-poaching camps we saw a tiger on the other side of the river course about 70m away. It was happily mud bathing."

"As we watched, a second tiger came to the water. It was amazing, to see one Kaziranga tiger is incredible but to see two! And then a third appeared, took a drink then slipped back into the tall elephant grass on the river bank. Our hearts were thumping and we just kept staring at the two tigers that remained, unable to believe our luck. When they moved into the shade of the tall grass we couldn’t believe how incredible our morning had been."
"Just as we thought we’d seen everything the third tiger returned and with him were two more grown up cubs. OMG what a day!"

The team had never seen anything like it; five Kaziranga tigers – a happy, healthy, tiger family living wild and free in one of the world's most amazing landscapes.

"We felt overwhelmed,” adds Binita. “We didn't want to leave the majestic scene but we had work to do and we left the tiger family to relax on the banks of the river surprised that an hour had passed!"

"While checking the cameras we continued to smile and think about our encounter. Yes this is Kaziranga, a place that sometimes allows us a glimpse into its beautiful soul, a place where you never know what is waiting for you. But to witness those glimpses of magic we must continue to provide a safe and secure environment for tigers to survive and thrive and to make sure that future generations have these forests, these plains and these moments of pure magic."


*This image is copyright of its original author


 


RE: Bigcats News - Apollo - 06-21-2014

Nice Sanjay
TFS
 


RE: Bigcats News - Vinod - 06-21-2014

Time to swallow some bitter pills

250 lions killed over past 5 years in Gujarat

According to the May 2010 census, there are 411 lions in the state spread in the area of 10,000 sqkm. But according to 2013 statistics, lions are now spread in an area of 20,000 sqkm. Experts feel that the death of 250-odd lions is alarming. In 2012-13, the number of deaths was 48, which increased to 53 in 2013-14. Also, in the first three months, approximately 20 lions have died, including eight in accidents. Of these eight, six were run over by trains.

Experts feel that the increase in number of such cases is mainly in the category of unnatural death. This includes electrocution or falling in wells. Officials said that the death of 20-odd lions — over 40% — were because of unnatural deaths in the state.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/environment/flora-fauna/250-lions-killed-over-past-5-years-in-Gujarat/articleshow/36913884.cms

darn at this rate all our lions gonna die [img]images/smilies/angry.gif[/img]

 


RE: Bigcats News - sanjay - 06-21-2014

Really disappointing news. Its important to implement some strict laws.


RE: Bigcats News - GuateGojira - 06-22-2014

Lions in India not only need new laws, they need a new home!

Gujarat most accept the fact that they can't sustain this situation anymore. There are too many lions in a small place. They have done a great job, that is true, but those lions need more space and if they can't give it to them, then there are other places where lions can live, not only in India, but also in North Africa now.
 


RE: Bigcats News - tigerluver - 06-22-2014

This is simply unacceptable. The lions won't be an attraction anymore if they're not there, I hope the province gets this soon. At this rate, I feel more pessimistic than usual. 


RE: Bigcats News - Apollo - 06-24-2014

It is believed that the last three Indian Cheetahs were shot in 1947 in Sarguja district in Central India, Madhya Pradesh by Maharajah Ramanuj Pratap Singh Deo. He can be seen here with the last Indian Cheetahs


*This image is copyright of its original author



 


RE: Bigcats News - Apollo - 06-25-2014

Tadoba Tiger encounter with Bikers