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Tiger Predation - Printable Version

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RE: Tiger Predation - stoja9 - 10-01-2017

Those claw marks..... shocked


RE: Tiger Predation - Apollo - 10-04-2017

Tiger playing with its sambar kill







RE: Tiger Predation - Apollo - 10-08-2017

Tiger feeding on gaur kill in Tadoba


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RE: Tiger Predation - Apollo - 10-09-2017

(10-08-2017, 09:25 PM)Apollo Wrote: Tiger feeding on gaur kill in Tadoba


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Another shot of same Waghdoh tigress feeding on gaur kill.



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RE: Tiger Predation - Rishi - 10-15-2017


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Umarpani male panting after a gaur hunt.


RE: Tiger Predation - Pckts - 10-16-2017

(10-15-2017, 06:04 PM)Rishi Wrote:
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Umarpani male panting after a gaur hunt.

Kanha Tigers love their Gaur.

Kunwar Shantanu Singh

When a Tiger tried to drag the whole big Cow
.
#King_of_the_Ruins
#Majestic_Kumbha
#RanthambhoreNationalPark







RE: Tiger Predation - stoja9 - 10-17-2017

Ungoldly strength and power.  shocked


RE: Tiger Predation - Pckts - 10-17-2017

(10-17-2017, 07:34 AM)stoja9 Wrote: Ungoldly strength and power.  shocked

A few more...











RE: Tiger Predation - Rishi - 10-18-2017

Bandhavgarh, Rajbehra female in action...

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RE: Tiger Predation - Diamir2 - 10-19-2017


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                     https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/11822171.pdf 
"Gaur was classified into; adult males (shiny black coat with heavy horns sweeping sideways and upwards), sub-adult males (dark brown coat with a conspicuous dorsal ridge and small dewlap hanging below the chin, large drapes between the fore legs), yearlings (10-20 months old)"


RE: Tiger Predation - Pckts - 10-19-2017

(10-19-2017, 01:54 AM)Diamir2 Wrote:
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                     https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/11822171.pdf

Having been here I'm curious as to how they come across these carcasses. It's so hard to see anything there, let alone kills with in the needed time frame to determine cause of death unless they happen near main roads. Then factoring in the time of year, during the monsoon month's I doubt they are going to see anything and during the summer months most animals are far less active, kills may be easier to monitor since tracks are more visible but I don't think it can offer a true representation of predation that's occurring.


RE: Tiger Predation - Rishi - 10-19-2017

(10-19-2017, 03:24 AM)Pckts Wrote: Having been here I'm curious as to how they come across these carcasses. It's so hard to see anything there, let alone kills with in the needed time frame to determine cause of death unless they happen near main roads. Then factoring in the time of year, during the monsoon month's I doubt they are going to see anything and during the summer months most animals are far less active, kills may be easier to monitor since tracks are more visible but I don't think it can offer a true representation of predation that's occurring.

These are mostly collected by the forest beat-watchers while patrolling (generally on foot), unlike the tourists who aren't permitted to leave the designated safari-paths.
If they pick up tracks they are supposed to follow it & locate the animal. 

That's how they corpses of dead tigers, deep inside the jungle, are found.

Also, most kills are made in close proximity of identified animal trails. So, while placing camera-traps you'd come across number of kill(/remnants).
Monsoons are when the reserves close & vigilance increases manifold due to higher poaching threat... So there's usually a lot more foots on the ground.


RE: Tiger Predation - Pckts - 10-19-2017

(10-19-2017, 12:03 PM)Rishi Wrote:
(10-19-2017, 03:24 AM)Pckts Wrote: Having been here I'm curious as to how they come across these carcasses. It's so hard to see anything there, let alone kills with in the needed time frame to determine cause of death unless they happen near main roads. Then factoring in the time of year, during the monsoon month's I doubt they are going to see anything and during the summer months most animals are far less active, kills may be easier to monitor since tracks are more visible but I don't think it can offer a true representation of predation that's occurring.

These are mostly collected by the forest beat-watchers while patrolling (generally on foot), unlike the tourists who aren't permitted to leave the designated safari-paths.
If they pick up tracks they are supposed to follow it & locate the animal. 

That's how they corpses of dead tigers, deep inside the jungle, are found.

Also, most kills are made in close proximity of identified animal trails. So, while placing camera-traps you'd come across number of kill(/remnants).
Monsoons are when the reserves close & vigilance increases manifold due to higher poaching threat... So there's usually a lot more foots on the ground.
Maybe so, but even the best trackers are going to have an extremely tough time tracking anything during the monsoons, reserves like Kanha and Pench are very hilly and dense forest even during the summer months as well, especially Kanha, so tracking on foot is a very difficult task. The best ones to ask are usually mahout, they always have the best information on Tiger movements. The elephants can go most places a tiger can and are extremely quiet even for such a large animal.


RE: Tiger Predation - Diamir2 - 10-23-2017

"There were altogether 48 kills of tiger has been found in Manas National Park. Based kills data gathered during present study that. Sambar (25.92 %) contributed major portion of the tigers' diet in Manas Natioanal Park that was followed by Bison (21.86 %), Barking Deer (17.73 %), Wild Boar (16.06 %), Hog Deer (7.62 %), Wild Buffalo (4.13 %), Hare (2.81 %). Porcupine (2.42 %). Hispid Hare (0.93 %) and least by Pigmy Hog (0.53 %)"
Rabha Abhijit 2012  "Ecology of tiger panthera tigris LINN 1758 in Manas national park Assam India" 

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(adult male wild buffalo ) 
PREY SELECTION PATTERN OF TIGER
PREY POPULATION OF TIGER 
Adult Male

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RE: Tiger Predation - Diamir2 - 10-23-2017


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"The Deer and the Tiger" GEORGE B. SCHALLER

"Buffalo usually avoid dense woodland as because they could not sense the presence of tiger which predates upon the buffaloes. Although some solitary bulls were recorded from the woodland as adult bulls are rarely attacked by tiger."
 "STUDIES ON THE ECOLOGY AND DISTRIBUTION OF WILD WATER BUFFALO Bubalus antee KERR. IN ASSAM WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO KAZIRANGA NATIONAL PARKBawri Mayur
Wild buffaloes of Kaziranga
Adult Male