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Tiger Predation - Printable Version

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RE: Tiger Predation - Apollo - 10-21-2016

Pacman killing a river turtle in Ranthambore zone 3


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RE: Tiger Predation - Diamir2 - 10-22-2016

(10-18-2016, 02:06 AM)peter Wrote: Another good one, Diamir. These young rewilded Amur tigers seem to be very capable hunters. Not every tiger would attack a big male wild boar, but these young guys seem to have no trouble with them at all.

Although the number of wild Amur tigers is slowly growing, quite a few are still poached every year. The budget for anti-poaching has dropped and it seems those who pledged to support the efforts in Russia (during the Meeting in St. Petersburg in 2010) didn't keep their word. Anti-poaching units now face young guys with very modern rifles prepared to shoot at everything that moves from cars. Locals seem to fear them more than tigers or bears.

Would you be able to find out a bit more on that one? In what way is Russia responding?

 Unfortunately, locals  to fear of tigers 

"On 21 December 2010, Pt99 was chased off a
wild boar Sus scrofa kill by a hunter with two
dogs. While the hunter claimed that the tiger
attacked unprovoked, snow tracking revealed
that the hunter tracked her away from the kill
site for about two kilometers, where he shot
Pt99 through an opening in the forest. Wounded
and provoked, Pt99 charged the hunter.
Although the man apparently shot again, this
did not stop her from severely mauling him.
The two dogs distracted the tigress and most
likely saved the poacher's life. Pt99 moved
about 600 meters to the west and rested for
nearly a day. Bed sites near where she was
shot indicated that she had been wounded in
the chest and possibly the hind quarters, but
later bed sites were bloodless. We attempted
to obtain visual contact and assess her condition
on December 23 by approaching in a logging
skidder. While unsuccessful, the attempt
demonstrated that Pt99 was still capable of
movement (she moved three kilometers in response to this disturbance), and her gait appeared
normal. The GPS collar enabled us to
promptly respond to this human tiger conflict
situation and closely m onitor her movements.
Given her injury and previous history, we
feared she would approach a village in search
of easy domestic prey and the specter of another attack on people was of great concern.
Two small villages were only ten kilometers
to the northeast and northwest of the site
where the shooting occurred. However, she
kept her distance from villages and killed a
first-year wild boar on 2 January, consuming
it completely. On 16 January she killed an
adult female boar and spent ten days at the
site. "
from CLAYTON S. MILLER YURI K. PETRUNENKO JOHN M. GOODRICH  
 IVAN V. SERYODKIN  AND DALE G. MIQUELLE


RE: Tiger Predation - Diamir2 - 10-22-2016

(10-20-2016, 10:02 PM)Pckts Wrote: From The Black Panther of Sivanipalli by Kenneth Anderson


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http://www.indianaturewatch.net/displayimage.php?id=433525
http://www.indianaturewatch.net/displayimage.php?id=372128


RE: Tiger Predation - Pckts - 10-22-2016

(10-22-2016, 03:48 AM)Diamir2 Wrote:
(10-20-2016, 10:02 PM)Pckts Wrote: From The Black Panther of Sivanipalli by Kenneth Anderson


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http://www.indianaturewatch.net/displayimage.php?id=433525
http://www.indianaturewatch.net/displayimage.php?id=372128
You'll like this one:
Here is the report of Odin and the Tiger


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Standing over 6 ft tall, weighing more than 1 ton in weight, Odin in his prime was the biggest bull in this area.


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He must be around 12 to 13 years old now, pretty old for a Gaur out in the wild and though he has lost much of his weight, he is still a formidable animal. I have been seeing him for the last 5 years, he’d come down during the evenings, graze by the edge of the watering hole before proceeding to drink his fill, he’d then look towards the cottages, hold his gaze for a while before moving back into the jungle. He was in his prime the first time I saw him, it was such a majestic animal with rippling muscles and an imposing gait. During my sojourns into the forest, I have seen him multiple times, grazing or resting under a tree. Most of the Gaurs would turn and bolt if they see a human approach, but not Odin, he would hold his ground knowing well that he had nothing to fear from a puny human. We both would look at each other, and we would keep a respectful distance before moving on.Gaurs are not very vocal animals, that is especially true in the evenings. So when I heard the distress-filled bellow coming from the edge of the forest at 8 in the night, I knew instinctively that something was wrong. I had seen Odin grazing in the grassland in the evening, and though he was past his prime, he was still a formidable opponent for any of the carnivores. A leopard wouldn’t dare attack a male Gaur, the wild dogs would be resting by this time and the only animal brave and strong enough to take on a mature Gaur is the Tiger. Yesterday night we had heard the Tiger call from close to the farm and during the early morning trek we saw huge pugmarks of the resident male Tiger, could it be that Odin had finally met his match?Then we heard the grunts of the Tiger mixed with the bellow of the Gaur, my fear was confirmed, it was clear that the battle was on. By the time I took the night-vision camera and raced to the watchtower, a few of our resident guests who had also heard the commotion were already there. We used the torch to see if we could see anything in the night. Apart from the alarmed spotted deer, we couldn’t see anything in the grassland, but we could still hear the battle-royale from the edge of the forest. At times the grunts would turn into thunderous roars, so it was clear that the Tiger had failed to deliver the killing blow – Tigers kill their prey by breaking the neck. Now that Odin knew that the threat was upon him, it was clear that he’d be wary of another attack to the neck and as Gaur’s usually do when attacked, he himself went into the attack mode. We could hear dry bamboo getting trampled under his weight as he was having a go at the Tiger using his massive horns. The Tiger had lost the surprise element as Odin knew that the attack was on, but the Tiger was still stronger, in his prime and the bull Gaur bull had just one eye. It was too much of a handicap to give away – surely, there was only one outcome to the end of this fight. After 10 minutes or so, the noise died out as quickly as it had started – only 2 things could have happened; Odin was dead or Odin, true to his name had outwitted the Tiger. If it was the latter, we knew that he’d come out into the grasslands once again because most of the animals feel safe close to human settlements. That is why you see spotted deer near human settlements inside the forest. We waited with baited breath, hoping to see a weary Odin limp back towards the watering hole. But there was no sign of Odin, perhaps it was the end of the majestic, bull Gaur that roamed the Thirunelly forests. Roam he would no more.After talking to the amazed guests, and telling them about what would have happened, I retired to my room. I was feeling dejected about Odin’s plight – but that is nature’s way, survival of the fittest. Odin was probably no match for the big resident male. (Boy.. how wrong was I!)I knew I wouldn’t sleep well that night, and by day-break I was up and ready with my camera and my trekking kit, and thankfully it was not raining. So at first light I headed out into the forest to see first-hand what had happened during the night. I reached the edge of the forest and in no time I could see where the battle had taken place. There were pools of blood, but there was no sign of Odin or the Cat. I scoured around to see if there was a drag mark, the Tiger, if it had made the kill would have dragged the Gaur deeper into the jungle. Odin was close to 1000kg, so he was far too heavy for a Tiger to lift, so it’d have left a distinct drag mark on the ground. I went around the area hoping that I wouldn’t see the mark and I was relieved when I didn’t. I could see the ground was trampled, large bamboo clumps were broken like twigs, there were pugmarks and hoofmarks everywhere – it was clear that both the beasts had not backed out of the fight and they both had a real go at each other.

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There was blood everywhere, it was a titanic battle between the Tiger and the Gaur.
 I decided to see where the animals had gone and it was not hard to find the two distinct trails, one of the Tiger and then of Odin and to my dismay, I could see that Odin had bled profusely as he moved deeper into the jungle. I kept following the track for close to 500 meters and then my heart sank when I saw the pugmark of the Tiger superimposed on Odin’s hoof mark, the Tiger had come back and had started trailing Odin once again.I had to be extra careful now as I was tracking an injured bull Gaur who wouldn’t like my approach, worse still, The Tiger could have killed the Gaur at night and perhaps he was guarding the kill and he wouldn’t take kindly to my approach either. I inched forward, stopping and listening for the sounds that would give away the presence of either of these animals. The blood trail was easy to follow and soon I reached a swamp where Odin had rested, though there were chunks of clotted blood on the ground, but it looked as though Odin was not as severely injured as I had earlier believed. The Tiger had also laid down perhaps 50 feet away from Odin, and they both had again gotten up and walked deeper into the jungle. I kept after them and wanted to know how it had ended. Soon I noticed that Odin had decided that he’d take a U-turn and come towards the farm once again! The Tiger had followed him as well.  By this time I would have covered close to 2 kms and with every passing step I could see that the blood trail was getting thinner and thinner, which was a good sign! We crossed some rivulets on the way and soon I passed the mota-teak tree (the big-teak tree) which is just a few hundred meters from the farm. Where was Odin heading, I wondered as I kept following the track and then I realized that it was just Odin’s track the I was following, the Tiger had stopped the chase and I couldn’t see the Tiger’s pug mark anymore. Retracing a few paces, I could see that the Tiger had taken a forest path which went deeper into the jungle, perhaps he thought that he had no chance of surprising Odin again that night.I continued on hoping to see Odin ahead of me and just as I broke cover and entered the grassland inside our farm, I could see the familiar figure, that of Odin, standing by the edge of the grassland grazing  as though nothing had happened! I stood there looking at the old warrior, admiring his courage and will to live, he outsmarted and outfought the big male Tiger, the wily old Odin!

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Odin was bleeding thanks to the attack last night, but the wounds weren’t life threatening

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The old bull Gaur – Odin with his battle scarsI coughed so that he knew I was near. He lifted his massive head and looked at me through his good eye! He knew it was me as he held his gaze and we made eye-contact for a few seconds before he lowered his head and started grazing again.  I could see the injuries he had sustained, a big piece of the muscular rump that he had on his back was bitten off and there were clear bite and claw marks on his shoulder and back. A small piece of his nose was also torn off, but the big bull had proved once again that it was not time for him to go, just yet. The Tiger had failed to get a grip on his neck and that had saved him.True to his name, he must have lost an eye, but in return he is blessed with extraordinary strength and wisdom.


RE: Tiger Predation - Polar - 10-23-2016

Tigress killing a gaur (not sure if this was uploaded earlier, and I doubt that gaur was fully adult). Also not sure which tigress this is, but she seemed to have tackled on to this bovine for a long time:







RE: Tiger Predation - Apollo - 10-23-2016

Tigress kill sambar in Ranthambore








RE: Tiger Predation - Pckts - 10-25-2016

(10-17-2016, 09:36 PM)Pckts Wrote: Another Gaur Predation in Tadoba


Digambar Chaple

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Sarosh Lodhi
"I'll be watching you"
To enjoy this image, please watch it in full screen mode only.
Tadoba
October - yesterday


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Rahul Kuchankar
"Shivanzhari Female & Cubs""

1st Day 2nd Show
@Kolsa range , Tadoba , Chandrapur
16 October 2016

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Rahul Kuchankar
"Shivanzhari Female ""

1st Day 2nd Show
@Kolsa range , Tadoba , Chandrapur
16 October 2016

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A few more
Amrut Naik
First sighting of the season..
Hungry Tiger cub feasting on a Gaur Kill ,
Kolsa - Oct 2016 — at Tadoba - Andhari Tiger Reserve.

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Amrut Naik
Look into my eyes and hear what I'm Saying!!!
Kolsa zone, Tadoba.. Oct 2016
Please view in full screen


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RE: Tiger Predation - Pckts - 10-25-2016

Early part of a Tiger preying on a Boar

Pawan Jaiswal Pench

Tiger hunt the vildbor vidio is not good long for wey
Morning drive 24/10/2016
— at Pench Tiger Reserve - Madhya Pradesh, India.
https://www.facebook.com/100011510109096/videos/283240138736321/


RE: Tiger Predation - Pckts - 10-25-2016

A couple more from the Gaur Kill


Alhaad Naik

Shivanzari Cub With Gaur Kill ........

#Oct-16


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" Naughty Shivanzari Cub Sit On Kill "
#Zari #Tadoba
#Oct-16


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RE: Tiger Predation - Diamir2 - 11-01-2016


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RE: Tiger Predation - Apollo - 11-05-2016







RE: Tiger Predation - Diamir2 - 11-06-2016

 Lord of The Jungle 
"However, what intrigued me most was how a lone tiger can subdue gaur, the largest wild cattle species in the world. These muscle-bound beasts, which look like they are on steroids, are three to four times heavier than the tiger. Their menacing horns can lethally impale a tiger; a well-placed kick can shatter its skull."(K. Ullas Karanth)http://voices.nationalgeographic.com/2013/12/03/rare-video-captures-tiger-making-its-kill/






RE: Tiger Predation - Pckts - 11-08-2016

Munna with his Gaur Kill


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RE: Tiger Predation - Pckts - 11-08-2016

Sudhir Shivaram Nature & Wildlife Photography
Bandhavgarh Tiger Kill Series...

There you go...one more from the series...the moment the mother brought down the Sambar Deer, the cub climbed on top as if it was his achievement...but that did not last for long as the Deer again got up, kicked the mother and escaped from there, only to be chased and later hunted!

This was photographed at 1:20pm as a part of the Sunrise to Sunset safari where we are allowed to stay for the whole day in the forest.

Canon 1DX + Canon EF 400mm f2.8 L IS II, ISO 400, f2.8 @ 1/1600, Evaluative Metering -2/3 Stop.

My next Sunrise to Sunset tour is in June. Message me in case you are interested to join. You can also check it on my photography learning website.

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Anjan Lal
Spotty With Her Prized Deer Kill at Tala Range

Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve 



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RE: Tiger Predation - Pckts - 11-08-2016

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Earning his stripes! Rare pictures of tiger killing a deer are captured by photographer who waited 660 HOURS for the perfect shot during 220 safaris in India
  • Stunning sequence of photos shows a tiger sprinting after its prey before leaping on its back and dragging it away
  • Images captured by British photographer Andy Rouse who has spent years waiting to see a tiger hunt unfolding
  • He had been on 220 safaris and waited 660 hours to capture what he called 'the holy grail' of photographing tigers
By Julian Robinson for MailOnline
Published: 10:44 EST, 3 June 2016 | Updated: 09:06 EST, 4 June 2016



The dramatic moment a tiger kills a deer has been captured by a photographer who waited 660 hours during 220 safaris in India to get the perfect shot.
Stunning photos show the big cat sprinting after its prey before leaping on its back and dragging it away in Ranthambore National park, Rajasthan, India.
The sequence of images was captured by British photographer Andy Rouse who has spent years waiting to see a tiger hunt unfolding in front of him. 

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The dramatic moment a tiger kills a deer has been captured by a photographer who waited 660 hours during 220 safaris in India to get the perfect shot

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Stunning photos show the big cat sprinting after its prey before leaping on its back and dragging it away in Ranthambore National park, Rajasthan, India

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The sequence of images was captured by British photographer Andy Rouse who has spent years waiting to see a tiger hunt unfolding in front of him
Until this point, the photographer had failed to capture what he referred to as 'the holy grail' of photographing tigers. 
He said: 'I have tried repeatedly to capture a tiger making a kill in the open, which is the holy grail of tiger shots because it's so rare.


'It is like winning the animal lottery of wildlife photography to get shots of a kill in the open, in the sun where the light is right. It was a superb day.'
'It was definitely one of the highlights of my year seeing a wild tiger kill in the open and actually managing to photograph it too!'
After making an initial three-month trip to take photos for his first book on the majestic creatures, the tiger enthusiast has gone back to Ranthambore on countless trips to observe the tigers. 

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Stalking: Until this point, the photographer had failed to capture what he referred to as 'the holy grail' of photographing tigers

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Attack: The tiger stalked its prey before sprinting after it and leaping on to its back in a dramatic ten minutes on the safari 

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The photographer and his six-man team came close to observing a kill on several occasions but luck was never on their side

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On the day of the kill, Mr Rouse was following female tiger Noor T39 (all tigers in the reserve are numbered), along a stone valley when she suddenly stopped and sat down, putting her legs underneath her

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After playing with her prey for a few minutes, Noor dragged it to a cave, out of the scorching 45 celsius heat in Rajasthan, India
Flying out for two-week stints, the safari drives lasted three hours at a time and were completed in the early morning and evening hours to avoid the hostile daytime temperatures, which could reach over 100 degrees Celsius.
The photographer and his six-man team came close to observing a kill on several occasions but luck was never on their side.
He said: 'You've just got to come round the corner at the right time when the tiger is waiting to make a kill. An awful lot of things have got to come together for it to go perfectly.'
'I've had many times watching a tiger in what I would call the perfect kill situation and then for whatever reason they didn't go for it. We were all sat there waiting, thinking "why aren't you doing it?" And then when they do go for it the chance of seeing a kill in the open is very low.' 

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From static to full-speed in a moment, the tigress quickly overtook the deer, before using her strength and size to take down her prey

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On the day of the kill, Mr Rouse was following a female tiger, along a stone valley when she suddenly stopped and sat down, putting her legs underneath her

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The giant tiger used all of its power to spring an attack on the deer, before dragging it down and clamping its jaws around its neck

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Surrounded by boulders and on an uneven, rocky riverbed, the Sambar Deer stood no chance against the power and speed of the tigress
On the day of the kill, Mr Rouse was following female tiger Noor T39 (all tigers in the reserve are numbered), along a stone valley when she suddenly stopped and sat down, putting her legs underneath her. 
He said: 'I knew from working with cats that this was a sign she was getting ready to run.'
'She gazed intently at us and just as I turned to see what she was looking at I heard some stones falling and saw a Sambar deer appear from the bushes.'
From static to full-speed in a moment, the tigress quickly overtook the deer, before using her strength and size to destroy her prey.
Surrounded by boulders and on an uneven, rocky riverbed, the Sambar Deer stood no chance against the power and speed of the tigress.

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As an experienced wildlife photographer Mr Rouse had seen plenty of hunts in the past but the brutality of the tiger's kill surprised even him

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Flying out for two-week stints, the safari drives lasted three hours at a time and were completed in the early morning and evening hours to avoid the hostile daytime temperatures, which could reach over 100 degrees Celsius

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As well as the hunt, Mr Rouse managed to capture the big cat feasting on its prey after it dragged the animal away behind rocks

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Dinner time: The stunning tiger tucked into its dinner after dragging it away behind rocks at Ranthambore National park, Rajasthan, India

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Mr Rouse said: 'I've seen lots of kills but when you see a tiger kill it's the awesome power and focus of the tiger that gets you
'The tiger was bouncing from boulder to boulder and just grabbed the deer and pulled it down. From start to finish it was over in 10 minutes.'
As an experienced wildlife photographer Mr Rouse had seen plenty of hunts in the past but the brutality of the tiger's kill surprised even him.
'I've seen lots of kills but when you see a tiger kill it's the awesome power and focus of the tiger that gets you. My adrenaline was pumping. Nothing prepared me for the raw savagery of the tiger charge. She was a bold and confident hunter.' 

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3623980/Earning-stripes-Rare-photos-tiger-killing-deer-captured-photographer-waited-660-HOURS-perfect-shot-220-safaris-India.html#ixzz4PN3PKiS5