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Freak Felids - A Discussion of History's Largest Felines - Printable Version

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RE: Freak Felids - A Discussion of History's Largest Felines - GrizzlyClaws - 09-15-2015

Yes, it does match, and it is definitely a seal tooth.

Previously, I thought it was a whale tooth because it is reminiscent of the marine mammal tooth that I've seen before.


RE: Freak Felids - A Discussion of History's Largest Felines - Pckts - 09-15-2015

Why do seal teeth root so much deeper than other animals?


RE: Freak Felids - A Discussion of History's Largest Felines - GrizzlyClaws - 09-15-2015

Most marine mammals have the deeply rooted teeth, maybe it is used to grab the slick skin of the prey?


RE: Freak Felids - A Discussion of History's Largest Felines - Pckts - 09-15-2015

One would think a deeper root would mean a stronger tooth, no?
Maybe marine mammals put much more strain on their teeth than we realize?


RE: Freak Felids - A Discussion of History's Largest Felines - Fieryeel - 09-15-2015

Regarding my original tooth, I just got off from a conversation with a fossil feline expert. He disagrees that mine is a big cat. He thinks it's a seal or some other marine mammal instead.


*This image is copyright of its original author


Him: From what I see - Not a cat. May be a seal or some other  marine mammal.

Me: Interesting. So the general size and shape does not indicate its species? Tiger fossils are well-documented in the Solo River.

Him: Nope  - the general  shape is very different. Also cats have striation along the length of the canine , I don't see any here And see the shape of the root  - too pointed.


RE: Freak Felids - A Discussion of History's Largest Felines - GrizzlyClaws - 09-15-2015

The lower canine of tiger can also have pointed root.

About the striation, because it is too fossilized to be visualized.

But anyway, since he/she is professional, maybe we shall respect his/her opinion regarding the fossil.


RE: Freak Felids - A Discussion of History's Largest Felines - GrizzlyClaws - 09-15-2015

Fossil: pre-Holocene - earlier than 8000 BC
Subfossil: Holocene - 8000 BC to 1800s
Recent: Anthropocene - 1800s to present

@GuateGojira @tigerluver

http://www.diatomsireland.com/fossil-subfossil-toome-bridge/


RE: Freak Felids - A Discussion of History's Largest Felines - tigerluver - 09-16-2015

(09-15-2015, 10:28 PM)Pckts Wrote: Why do seal teeth root so much deeper than other animals?


We are digressing a bit, I might create a separate thread for fossil identification but until, the direct reason is the mandible:

*This image is copyright of its original author


The symphysis of the body is deep and curved, and thus the canine fits perfectly in that manner.

I really don't think @Fieryeel's canine is a pinniped or otter tooth. The curvature doesn't match, It does look a bit odd for a cat tooth but not as odd when compared to marine mammals, from whales to seals. Its thinness also looks quite like the tiger teeth of the Solo area, which were relatively thin in terms of length and width.


RE: Freak Felids - A Discussion of History's Largest Felines - GrizzlyClaws - 09-16-2015

@tigerluver, you can compare the solo tooth with both skull and mandible, so you can see which one fits better.

Maybe you can also compare the 14 cm lower canine in China.


RE: Freak Felids - A Discussion of History's Largest Felines - GrizzlyClaws - 09-16-2015

Those thin looking canine teeth can also be seen in Thailand.

And I guess the canine teeth of the Ngandong tiger might be relatively thinner.

And this pair of teeth look like the upper canine teeth, and around an inch longer than @Fieryeel's tooth which is supposed to be a lower canine tooth.

The prehistoric Sunda Shelf might stretch from Philippines to Thailand.


*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Freak Felids - A Discussion of History's Largest Felines - Fieryeel - 09-16-2015

I am still leaning towards Ngandong Tiger for mine though.

I'll see if I can find any pictures of pinniped teeth with the same fat profile as mine.


RE: Freak Felids - A Discussion of History's Largest Felines - GrizzlyClaws - 09-16-2015

(09-16-2015, 07:15 AM)Fieryeel Wrote: I am still leaning towards Ngandong Tiger for mine though.

I'll see if I can find any pictures of pinniped teeth with the same fat profile as mine.

Not every fossil feline expert is familiar with the prehistoric tiger.

The tooth of the Ngandong tiger is proportionally thinner, but still very heavy, just like its bones.


RE: Freak Felids - A Discussion of History's Largest Felines - GrizzlyClaws - 09-16-2015

The mandible of the modern Javan tiger can also use for the comparison with the Solo tooth.


*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Freak Felids - A Discussion of History's Largest Felines - Fieryeel - 09-16-2015

The primary issue according to the fossil feline expert is that my tooth root has a pointed end, while large cat canines are blunt.


RE: Freak Felids - A Discussion of History's Largest Felines - GrizzlyClaws - 09-16-2015

(09-16-2015, 07:33 AM)Fieryeel Wrote: The primary issue according to the fossil feline expert is that my tooth root has a pointed end, while large cat canines are blunt.

For tiger, the upper canine teeth always have a blunt root, but the lower canine teeth can have a pointed root.

Sometimes those veteran tooth collectors might even have more general knowledge about the big cat canine teeth than the big cat experts.