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Animal News (Except Bigcats) - Printable Version

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RE: Animal News (Except Bigcats) - Lycaon - 04-17-2019

@BorneanTiger 

Fingers crossed for arabian leopards rediscovery in the U.A.E


RE: Animal News (Except Bigcats) - Sanju - 04-17-2019

Actually these days I'm not sharing anything in the forum (or any other social media platform like fb/twitter/quora) except in some threads and sharing in it upto some extent due to lack of time which is the thing that I don't have with lot of works.

Anyway I couldn't resist this from sharing (I saw this on that day but didn't share)...

Pretty depressing.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Gone!

At the same time the last female Yangtze  Softshell Turtle died.

We place a ridiculously skewed value on objects that are far from essential to our (Humans) survival yet watch as ecosystems rapidly degrade to the point of collapse - at what cost to humanity ?

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-47932731?fbclid=IwAR1iLy0sITEmAOcRuG3g7gLRqv6M_BkErUTSswYltam4vZJVC2RFKiFB7lw


*This image is copyright of its original author

China turtle death: One of last four known Yangtze giant softshells dies

The Yangtze giant softshell turtles thrive in muddy water and can weigh up to 90 kg (200 pounds)

The Last Giant Turtle Of Her Kind Just Passed Away

This is what extinction looks like.

One of the world's rarest turtles, a Yangtze giant softshell, has died in China, leaving just three known survivors of the species.

The female turtle (Rafetus swinhoei) died in Suzhou zoo in southern China.

Quote:Experts had tried to artificially inseminate the creature, which was over 90 years old, for a fifth time shortly before she died.

The species has suffered from hunting, overfishing and the destruction of its habitat.

The female Yangtze giant softshell turtle passed away at the Suzhou Shangfangshan Forest Zoo in China, where she has lived since 2008. She was put under anesthesia during a fifth attempt to artificially inseminate her, a procedure that people hoped would help save her species from extinction. This time, she never woke up.

Quote:With just three male Yangtze giant softshell turtles left, the death of the last female makes the species functionally extinct.


One male, estimated to be more than 100 years old, is left in the Chinese zoo | while two other turtles live in the wild in Vietnam. The elusive nature of the turtle means it has been difficult to identify the gender of the pair.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Several attempts at artificial insemination had taken place in the hope of continuing the species, but they all failed

Local staff and international experts had attempted to artificially inseminate the female 24 hours before she died on Saturday afternoon.

They said there were no complications from the operation and she had been in fine health after the procedure, but deteriorated the next day.

The cause of her death is being investigated and the turtle's ovarian tissue was collected for future research.

"It is tragic that the only known female of this species has died," the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) wrote in a statement, "but the real tragedy here is that this species has been decimated to near extinction by hunting and habitat destruction."

The female was first brought to the zoo in hopes that she would successfully mate with a 100-year-old male Yangtze giant softshell in residence there. But the couple never managed to reproduce naturally. That's when conservationists decided to try artificial insemination. The female underwent several attempted insemination procedures that failed to produce viable eggs before she died during the fifth.

“Sadly, this time the female turtle did not recover normally as she had in the past and she died despite 24 hours of nonstop emergency care," WCS wrote.

But there's a faint glimmer of hope: The species is famously elusive in the wild, so it's possible there's still a female hiding somewhere in the forests of China and Vietnam — it's just a matter of keeping her habitat safe and finding her.

"Scientists hope that this species can still be saved by working in conjunction with partners in China and with the Vietnamese government where two individuals of this turtle species, whose sex has not been determined, are known to be in the wild," WCS wrote.

You can help prevent turtles from going extinct by making a donation to the Turtle Survival Alliance.



But there's a faint glimmer of hope: The species is famously elusive in the wild, so it's possible there's still a female hiding somewhere in the forests of China and Vietnam — it's just a matter of keeping her habitat safe and finding her.

"Scientists hope that this species can still be saved by working in conjunction with partners in China and with the Vietnamese government where two individuals of this turtle species, whose sex has not been determined, are known to be in the wild," WCS wrote.


RE: Animal News (Except Bigcats) - Sanju - 04-21-2019

Gorillas as long as they don't feel threatened or challenged for dominance, they are sensitive and docile beings. Along with that, these rangers are daily visitors for them.

Me and my pri-mates! Anti-poaching ranger's extraordinary selfies with two wild gorillas that look almost HUMAN in Congo national park
  • Virunga, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, has 600 dedicated rangers 
  • Latest picture garnered 12 thousand likes and 14 thousand shares on Facebook
  • All of the rangers go through an extensive six-month training regime

*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Animal News (Except Bigcats) - BorneanTiger - 04-22-2019

(04-17-2019, 11:45 PM)Sanju Wrote: Actually these days I'm not sharing anything in the forum (or any other social media platform like fb/twitter/quora) except in some threads and sharing in it  upto some extent due to lack of time which is the thing that I don't have with lot of works.

Anyway I couldn't resist this from sharing (I saw this on that day but didn't share)...

Pretty depressing.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Gone!

At the same time the last female Yangtze  Softshell Turtle died.

We place a ridiculously skewed value on objects that are far from essential to our (Humans) survival yet watch as ecosystems rapidly degrade to the point of collapse - at what cost to humanity ?

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-47932731?fbclid=IwAR1iLy0sITEmAOcRuG3g7gLRqv6M_BkErUTSswYltam4vZJVC2RFKiFB7lw


*This image is copyright of its original author

China turtle death: One of last four known Yangtze giant softshells dies

The Yangtze giant softshell turtles thrive in muddy water and can weigh up to 90 kg (200 pounds)

The Last Giant Turtle Of Her Kind Just Passed Away

This is what extinction looks like.

One of the world's rarest turtles, a Yangtze giant softshell, has died in China, leaving just three known survivors of the species.

The female turtle (Rafetus swinhoei) died in Suzhou zoo in southern China.

Quote:Experts had tried to artificially inseminate the creature, which was over 90 years old, for a fifth time shortly before she died.

The species has suffered from hunting, overfishing and the destruction of its habitat.

The female Yangtze giant softshell turtle passed away at the Suzhou Shangfangshan Forest Zoo in China, where she has lived since 2008. She was put under anesthesia during a fifth attempt to artificially inseminate her, a procedure that people hoped would help save her species from extinction. This time, she never woke up.

Quote:With just three male Yangtze giant softshell turtles left, the death of the last female makes the species functionally extinct.


One male, estimated to be more than 100 years old, is left in the Chinese zoo | while two other turtles live in the wild in Vietnam. The elusive nature of the turtle means it has been difficult to identify the gender of the pair.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Several attempts at artificial insemination had taken place in the hope of continuing the species, but they all failed

Local staff and international experts had attempted to artificially inseminate the female 24 hours before she died on Saturday afternoon.

They said there were no complications from the operation and she had been in fine health after the procedure, but deteriorated the next day.

The cause of her death is being investigated and the turtle's ovarian tissue was collected for future research.

"It is tragic that the only known female of this species has died," the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) wrote in a statement, "but the real tragedy here is that this species has been decimated to near extinction by hunting and habitat destruction."

The female was first brought to the zoo in hopes that she would successfully mate with a 100-year-old male Yangtze giant softshell in residence there. But the couple never managed to reproduce naturally. That's when conservationists decided to try artificial insemination. The female underwent several attempted insemination procedures that failed to produce viable eggs before she died during the fifth.

“Sadly, this time the female turtle did not recover normally as she had in the past and she died despite 24 hours of nonstop emergency care," WCS wrote.

But there's a faint glimmer of hope: The species is famously elusive in the wild, so it's possible there's still a female hiding somewhere in the forests of China and Vietnam — it's just a matter of keeping her habitat safe and finding her.

"Scientists hope that this species can still be saved by working in conjunction with partners in China and with the Vietnamese government where two individuals of this turtle species, whose sex has not been determined, are known to be in the wild," WCS wrote.

You can help prevent turtles from going extinct by making a donation to the Turtle Survival Alliance.



But there's a faint glimmer of hope: The species is famously elusive in the wild, so it's possible there's still a female hiding somewhere in the forests of China and Vietnam — it's just a matter of keeping her habitat safe and finding her.

"Scientists hope that this species can still be saved by working in conjunction with partners in China and with the Vietnamese government where two individuals of this turtle species, whose sex has not been determined, are known to be in the wild," WCS wrote.

Indeed, just because these are the only ones known to us doesn't have to mean that they are the only ones. Recently, a Hawaiian plant that was thought to be extinct was rediscovered: https://qz.com/1600255/botanists-are-using-drones-to-rediscover-extinct-flowers/, https://www.staradvertiser.com/2019/04/19/breaking-news/kauai-researchers-rediscover-native-hawaiian-flower-once-thought-extinct/


RE: Animal News (Except Bigcats) - Sanju - 04-22-2019

@BorneanTiger These type of rediscoveries happen time to time which are thought to be extinct. We are living in a vast world. Let's hope there are more turtles in the wild but let's not forget that they also can be the victims of humans any moment or second. Humans (Poachers & hunters) will always look to track-down them if they have to.


RE: Animal News (Except Bigcats) - BorneanTiger - 04-25-2019

(04-22-2019, 07:30 PM)Sanju Wrote: @BorneanTiger These type of rediscoveries happen time to time which are thought to be extinct. We are living in a vast world. Let's hope there are more turtles in the wild but let's not forget that they also can be the victims of humans any moment or second. Humans (Poachers & hunters) will always look to track-down them if they have to.

Conversely, these hunters occasionally need to be careful, as some of these animals can be dangerous. Remember the case of a cassowary (a large flightless bird that has a raptor-like claw on its foot, and is thus seen as a modern-day version of the velociraptor (https://blog.nationalgeographic.org/2015/03/24/revealing-a-modern-day-velociraptor/, https://futurism.com/cassorwary-australias-velociraptor), yet looks quite like a corythoraptor (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-05016-6)) killing a man earlier? Strangely, that cassowary is now up for sale: https://www.thisisinsider.com/dangerous-cassowary-bird-killed-owner-up-for-auction-2019-4

The raptor-like foot-claw of the "World's most dangerous bird", the cassowary: https://futurism.com/cassorwary-australias-velociraptor

*This image is copyright of its original author


https://www.thisisinsider.com/dangerous-cassowary-bird-killed-owner-up-for-auction-2019-4 

*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Animal News (Except Bigcats) - Sanju - 04-26-2019

@BorneanTiger Yeah I too know about that killer bird for sale ! (https://slate.com/technology/2019/04/killer-cassowary-is-for-sale-with-rest-of-flock.html?fbclid=IwAR2XZX3B7Xo9CLoL_uTX1wvyNK3lEmQxKA91CHGw_fyjyTKeIj7EnUwn8-s) I love those ratites coz they kill many humans annually avenging the dead animals killed by humans and dangerous af. These days, lions are also doing good job by killing poachers. There should be someone who poach the poachers.


RE: Animal News (Except Bigcats) - BorneanTiger - 04-26-2019

(04-26-2019, 12:33 AM)Sanju Wrote: @BorneanTiger Yeah I too know about that killer bird for sale ! (https://slate.com/technology/2019/04/killer-cassowary-is-for-sale-with-rest-of-flock.html?fbclid=IwAR2XZX3B7Xo9CLoL_uTX1wvyNK3lEmQxKA91CHGw_fyjyTKeIj7EnUwn8-s) I love those ratites coz they kill many humans annually avenging the dead animals killed by humans and dangerous af. These days, lions are also doing good job by killing poachers. There should be someone who poach the poachers.

Yes, but bearing in mind that a number of poachers may have been poor, and thus forced to take up this terrible job (https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-on-the-edge-of-extinction-b-the-lion-panthera-leo?pid=80360#pid80360), tackling poaching should come hand in hand with tackling poverty, otherwise it would be a case similar to why certain forest-dwelling people in India try to destroy wildlife with fires, like in Kerala's Wayanad (https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/kozhikode/recent-fires-in-wayanad-manmade-forest-dept/articleshow/68142846.cms), that the focus is on preserving wildlife rather than the welfare of people in those areas, which is ironically similar to what happened in the developed country of France, the World is so shaken about the burning of the Notre Dame Cathedral that it is ready to spend millions rebuilding it, but what about the poor yellow-vest workers who have been demanding better rights (https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/apr/20/gilets-jaunes-battle-riot-police-and-light-fires-in-paris-over-high-taxes)? Is the rich, global society more concerned about wildlife and historical monuments than about poor people?


RE: Animal News (Except Bigcats) - Sanju - 04-26-2019

@BorneanTiger 
Unlike Psych Trophy hunters Poachers may be poor, hence are making wildlife trade, bush meat and hunting as livelihood option. It is too incorrect, instead of saying "we are contining our ancestors hunting legacy and tradition", "we don't like urban life"...

They should send their children to school, leave forests and work with forest department to save nature around them. People like poachers who don't like to work hard and always look for cross ways to become wealthy and happy should be prosecuted. Of course these are the things which are in administrative govt hands to create awaeness and develop tribal communities into modern lifestyle and hunting lifestyle. There are many people who are in good position and status by working hard even their background is tribal community.


POACHING SHOULD NEVER BE ENCOURAGED EVEN FOR POOR. EDUCATION IS MUST AND SHOULD FOR EVERYONE, IT WILL GUIDE THEM TO SECURE THEIR LIVES.

In our Andhra too our AP (telangana too) govt is terribly failing to kick out chenchus from NSTR, and other nallamala forest ranges which are critical habitat for andhra tigers. These people are direct hunter gatherers (degrading habitats by livestock, intervening in ecosystem, feeding on tiger prey through hunting etc..,) but stubborn to accept modern way of life even after govt offered good agricultural land, houses, children education and money outside PA.






RE: Animal News (Except Bigcats) - Sanju - 04-30-2019

Indian army says it found yeti footprints in the Himalayas
Mount Makalu is the world's fifth highest mountain and is located about 12 miles south of Mount Everest.

*This image is copyright of its original author

The footprints were found in the snow near Mount Makalu base camp. Indian Army via Reuters

@Pckts
@Rage2277 are you from America ?
Yeti are known in the U.S. as bigfoot or the abominable snowman.

Some noticed that the photos appeared to show the footprints in a straight line, one behind the other, similar to what might be expected from a model.

Molecular biologist Ross Barnett said that if DNA samples were collected, they could potentially be analyzed to determine what kind of animal left the footprints in the snow.

Whether or not the origin of the footprints was narrowed down, Barnett was confident yeti sightings would continue.

"You can’t kill a legend with anything as mundane as facts," he said.

Research carried out by Barnett and fellow ancient-genetics expert Ceiridwen Edwards in 2014 had found that DNA samples taken from reported yeti sightings matched brown bears local to the Himalayan region.


RE: Animal News (Except Bigcats) - Rage2277 - 04-30-2019

(04-30-2019, 10:34 PM)Sanju Wrote: Indian army says it found yeti footprints in the Himalayas
@Pckts
@Rage2277 are you from america ?

i guess the caribbean can be considered part of america


RE: Animal News (Except Bigcats) - Sanju - 05-01-2019

wtf !? mc Angry 
Botswana’s Plan To Cull Elephants And Sell Them As PET FOOD Wins Ministerial Approval


*This image is copyright of its original author

A Botswana Defence Force colonel near the marked remains of an elephant killed in the Chobe national park area

*This image is copyright of its original author

African bush elephants in Botswana may lose their protection from the 2014 law

*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Animal News (Except Bigcats) - Sanju - 05-02-2019

@Lycaon Confused hope they will keep it safe unlike pride. @Spalea Species keep evolving and discover new areas when it is adaptive and suitable. Another example added. lammergeyer is evolving outside the historic range into new zones.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Gypaetus barbatus (Near threatened) is one of my favorite. coolest bird tbh. Fantastic

*This image is copyright of its original author

Forest Guard at Girnar Wildlife Sanctuary Clicks First Pictures of lammergeier in Gujarat

https://www.news18.com/news/india/forest-guard-at-girnar-wildlife-sanctuary-clicks-first-pictures-of-bearded-vulture-in-gujarat-2124769.html

According to bird watchers, the Bearded Vulture is found in the Himalayas and in the mountains of Afghanistan and western Pakistan, with unpredictable local movements, and is a winter migrant to Sindh and Balochistan.

*This image is copyright of its original author

A photo of the Bearded Vulture clicked by the forester.
 
After a forest guard of Girnar Wildlife Sanctuary in Junagadh, Gujarat, spotted a Bearded Vulture and captured it in frames, ornithologists confirmed that this was the first photographic record of the bird species in the Gujarat.

*This image is copyright of its original author

“On the morning of January 15, 2019, I visited the Ransivav area in the sanctuary. This region is located near the Girnar Hills. I observed some birds of prey soaring on thermals late that morning. Among them, I noticed a large bird soaring alongside an Oriental Honey Buzzard (Pernis ptilorhynchus). I took a few photographs of both the soaring birds,’’ Forest Guard Dipak Vadher told News18.

*This image is copyright of its original author

“After coming home, I initially identified the other bird as an Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) and posted the photos on my Facebook page. Nirav Bhatt, who has studied birds of prey in Gujarat, replied that the mystery bird looked different and requested me to send all the photos I had taken in high-resolution.

*This image is copyright of its original author

After studying these images, he confirmed that the bird was a juvenile or immature Bearded Vulture (Gypaetus barbatus), also known as Lammergeier. Though the bird was seen only in flight, it showed well all the identification features — the large size (as compared to the nearby Oriental Honey Buzzard), dark head and neck, pale creamy underparts, large wedge-shaped tail, pointed wings and the typical ‘beard’ was seen below the beak in one of the images. The large wedge-shaped tail eliminated other Gyps vultures and also Aquila eagles,” Vadher said, adding the Egyptian Vulture, though similar in shape, is much smaller, with a smaller tail and lacks the ‘beard’.

*This image is copyright of its original author

According to bird watchers, the Bearded Vulture is found in the Himalayas and in the mountains of Afghanistan and western Pakistan, with unpredictable local movements, and is a winter migrant to Sindh and Balochistan in Pakistan.

While it lives in the Himalayas in India, there are no records of it from anywhere else in the country.

“For Gujarat, a record of a Bearded Vulture was claimed from Vighakot near the India-Pakistan border in the Greater Rann of Kachchh (in 2005). However, due to lack of photographs or any other corroborative evidence, it was treated as unconfirmed.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Thus, the present sighting confirms the occurrence of the Bearded Vulture in Gujarat and is an addition to the Gujarat checklist. This is the southern-most record of the species for India. Another interesting aspect about this sighting from the Girnar Wildlife Sanctuary is that this sanctuary is located in Saurashtra.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Here, it should be noted that the Girnar Hills are the highest point in the Saurashtra region, with the highest peak is at 1,117m and the Bearded Vulture is said to prefer mountainous areas,’’ said a note on the Bearded Vulture sighting published in Indian Birds, a bi-monthly ornithology journal.

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

“The Bearded Vulture is a winter migrant to Sindh, in western Pakistan, from where the bird can drift into Gujarat. It is an ‘occasional visitor to the higher hill ranges such as Kirthar in January and February’ in Sindh... It can be expected to be a vagrant to nearby areas like Kachchh (or maybe even in Rajasthan), but this sighting is quite far from its normal wintering range. It is possible that the species wanders to suitable hilly/mountainous areas in the winter,’’ a note in the journal added.

*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Animal News (Except Bigcats) - BorneanTiger - 05-04-2019

What a hobby: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/alaska-moose-poop-juneau-airport-1.5118513  Lol Laughing
Man brings carry-on full of moose poop through Alaska airport security
Man reportedly told airport staff he collects droppings 'for politicians and their bleep policies'

*This image is copyright of its original author



RE: Animal News (Except Bigcats) - BorneanTiger - 05-09-2019

An Asiatic black bear has been spotted in the DMZ (Demilitarised Zone) between North and South Korea: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-48214343

BBC: "Because the area is so cut-off, it has become a pristine nature reserve. According to South Korea's Ministry of Environment, there are over 5,097 animal and plant species in the zone.
The red-crowned crane and black-faced spoonbill are among the rare birds that can be found in the DMZ.
The red-crowned crane is one of the rarest in the world, and classified as endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Its global population is estimated to number around 3,050.
Birds also migrate through the DMZ to Mongolia, China, Russia, the Philippines and Australia.
Other animals such as the Amur goral, Cinereous vulture and Eurasian lynx have been spotted in the area."

*This image is copyright of its original author