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The Hoofed Predators

United States Polar Online
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#16

(04-24-2016, 07:34 AM)tigerluver Wrote: A lot of prehistoric species we don't have a true "average" figure for. There are usually less than a handful of worthwhile specimens that certainly cannot properly represent the entire population. For A. simus, we fortunately do have a lot of bones and the average for males was likely 700-800 kg off the top of my head, but I might be remembering wrong. There is only A. angustidens specimens, so no average can be given here. I am not aware of how many Sarkastodon specimens there are to say anything on their averages.

A.simus, in my opinion, was more of 600 kilograms. Also, I would place A.angustidens at 850 kilograms. Sarkastodon would be at 800 kilograms as already decided.
"Polar bears are the world's largest extant mammalian predator. Despite their size, they are capable of feats none can compare to, including but not limited to: dragging a three-ton walrus with only its jaws."

- Polar, January 2017
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United States brotherbear Offline
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#17

Daenodon - predator or scavenger?
                                                             
*This image is copyright of its original author
 ~ ~ Grizzly - Ursus arctos - Brown Bear ~ ~         
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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#18

Daenodon 
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*This image is copyright of its original author

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*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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#19
( This post was last modified: 04-16-2017, 08:21 AM by epaiva )

Archaeotherium Skull
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*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author


- Length of skull 53,5 cm
- Wide of skull 43 cm
- Length of upper canine 8,2 cm
- Length of lower canine 6,5 cm
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Canada Kingtheropod Offline
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#20
( This post was last modified: 04-16-2017, 12:34 PM by Kingtheropod )

I find the skull of Entelodonts and Andrewsarchus to be very different. The skull of Andrewsarchus does not have the protruding boney cheeks like you see in the Entelodont skull. I believe it was a closely related but distinct group. Due to this, I think that there is no reason to believe Andrewsarchus shared the same proportions of Entelodonts.

Also, the teeth on Andrewsarchus look more carnivorous then that in Entelodonts. The back molar teeth in Daeodon are flat, made to chew plant material, but the teeth on Andrewsarchus are tapered and more pointed, designed to crush bone like hyena molar teeth. This indicates that if they are in fact relatives, it seems that these branch of ungulates started out as carnivores, eventually evolving to become more and more omnivorous.

https://lgsquirrel.files.wordpress.com/2...uscast.jpg

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c..._skull.jpg
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#21

Maybe the Entelodonts were more omnivorous?
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