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Reintroduction of wolves and lynx into Britain

United Kingdom SVTIGRIS Offline
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( This post was last modified: 12-12-2015, 04:29 PM by SVTIGRIS )

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-33533035

Thoughts? We all know the positives in that it will contain the out of control deer population that eat crops, but can big predators like wolves be successfully reintroduced, or has it been too long since their last inhabitation? And will as is often the case, the big predator be killed for eating livestock? And is britain too Urban, could wolves take the path foxes take and become urban scavenging all they can?


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"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United Kingdom SVTIGRIS Offline
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This project is starting to pick up some pace now, imo it's just a matter of time.
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United States malikc6 Offline
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I'm all for it.
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United Kingdom SVTIGRIS Offline
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Thought I'd revive this thread with some more insight

Sunday, August 21, 2016


Reintroducing the wolf to Scotland
As a UK based large carnivore charity, we receive numerous enquiries about reintroduction of wolves to Scotland. This section of the website aims to clarify some of the issues surrounding a controversial topic.
In our view, in order for any reintroduction of the wolf to Scotland to be successful, it is first necessary to secure a safe and viable future for wolves in areas of Europe where they have managed to survive human persecution, and in areas where they have returned, aided by legal protection and European Community policies and conventions encouraging conservation of native habitats, flora and fauna. A model of co-existence formulated through this experience can then be applied to the challenge of restoring large carnivores in the Scottish Highlands.
Wolves and Humans aims to present the facts about wolves and share over twenty years experience of working with people who live and work alongside wolves and other large carnivores, in order to enable people to consider and discuss the issues, and hopefully lay the foundations for informed debate about possible reintroduction in the future. There is still a lot to learn from other countries about co-existing with wolves; resolving problems of livestock conflict, impact of human development on wolves, management of wolf populations and many other issues.

*This image is copyright of its original author
Reintroducing the wolf to the Scottish Highlands was first proposed in the late 1960s, but the idea only started to gain wider publicity and support following the reintroductions of the red wolf to the south-eastern United States in 1989, and the grey wolf to Yellowstone National Park in 1995. The media are always happy to report a story about reintroduction, keeping the topic constantly in the public forum; most proposals reported are unfounded, and lacking in scientific credibility.
Although the British government is required to consider the reintroduction of native species under article 22 of the EU Habitats and Species Directive of 1992, any proposal for reintroduction to Scotland would have to be approved by Scottish Natural Heritage, the government organisation responsible for wildlife and habitats in Scotland, and their position remains that they have no plans to consider reintroduction of wolves.
This is not going to change until something persuades them that reintroduction would not be a controversial issue and would be widely welcomed by the whole spectrum of land users and interests in Scotland. There are however pointers for the future; agriculture in Scotland, particularly sheep farming, which has always been one of the major stumbling blocks for returning large carnivores, has changed. From 2005, subsidies based on production, where farmers and crofters receive payment per head of sheep or cattle, were replaced by Single Farm Payments. This means that farms and crofts receive a subsidy regardless of whether livestock are grazed, or crops grown. This change, coupled with incentives such as the Farm Woodland Premium Scheme, which provides grants for regeneration of native woodland and forestry, could see sheep being replaced by woodland restoration in the future, thus increasing suitable habitat for both predators and their prey.
The concept of ‘rewilding’ – returning areas of the countryside to a more natural state and restoring once native species of flora and fauna, including wolves and lynx, has received much publicity in recent years, with journalist George Monbiot and his book ‘Feral’ providing a focal point. A charity, Rewilding Britain, has been set up with the aim of building a wider movement for rewilding and ultimately restoring ecosystems on land and at sea. Media publicity surrounding this moverment is bringing the concept of ecological restoration to a much wider audience than previously, and could help to change public perception of how the countryside should be managed and increase support for restoring species such as the wolf.
In the meantime, there is much valuable work being carried out by conservation groups such as Trees for Life to restore habitat, particularly the Caledonian forest in the Scottish Highlands. There is currently a trial reintroduction of the beaver in Knapdale in Scotland; if this is successful, and is followed by other reintroductions - possibly lynx, as proposed by the Lynx UK Trust, and wild boar, which are already present in many parts of the UK as farm escapees, then the ecosystem in Scotland will in future years be a much healthier place to welcome back the apex predator - the wolf.
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United Kingdom SVTIGRIS Offline
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It was said in 2015 the reintroduction of Wolves and Lynx were to go into operation in October, but it seems plans have stagnated. I would be thrilled if this came to fruition not only because of the obvious solution they provide, but because it'll be the most exciting wildlife locally I'll probably ever see.

And don't give me any of that culling nonesense if you belive that'll control population, remember Yellowstone?
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United Kingdom SVTIGRIS Offline
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Seems plans have stagnated to a halt. Just recycled articles from things written years ago. Going through with It is the most logical and viable option to restore the natural ecosystem so I don't see the problem. And wolves pose a tiny insignificant threat to people, they are more of a danger if you crash into them actually. Hate the dismissal for nature in our turbulent politics.
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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With introducing animals which have not been somewhere in a long time there will always be the social risk that comes with it as this article explores.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Europe’s Wolves — They’re Back

By Addison Nugent

Why you should care
Because conservation comebacks can upset the status quo.





On the evening of June 5, 2015, Romain Ferrand, then 16, was on his family’s cattle farm in the Maritime Alps in the south of France. Sitting outside, the young man suddenly heard a commotion erupt from the ordinarily tranquil mountain darkness: Cows mooed loudly in the distance, and the dogs began to bark and growl ferociously. Romain called his brother, Benjamin, and the two set out into the night armed with flashlights and their father’s hunting knife and rifle.
As soon as they arrived at the cattle pen, they saw eyes shining beyond the electric fence. They were the eyes of a predator recently returned to France — the Eurasian wolf. Benjamin went back to the farmhouse for reinforcements, leaving Romain alone with the knife and rifle. Perhaps sensing the teen’s vulnerability, nine wolves leaped from the darkness and surrounded him, snarling and snapping until the terrified young man fired a warning shot, and the pack dispersed into the night.
Quote:It’s impossible for us farmers to cohabitate with the wolf.
Jean-Luc Ferrand
Romain Ferrand’s ordeal is symptomatic of France’s intensifying wolf problem. The adaptable animals began drifting from Italy into France around 1992 and have been slowly increasing their numbers ever since. Though these relatively shy apex predators usually avoid humans, attacks on livestock have increased dramatically over the past decade, spelling trouble for traditional French free-range grass grazing and costing 21.4 million euros annually in public spending to compensate farmers for losses due to wolf predation and for protective measures. French farmers and animal conservationists are now at odds, with farmers campaigning for the right to kill the once-endangered species. “It’s impossible for us farmers to cohabitate with the wolf,” says Jean-Luc Ferrand, Romain’s father.

*This image is copyright of its original author

 
        
Ranging free and wild in Germany’s Bavarian Forest National Park.
Source DEA / C.DANI / I.JESKE/Getty
And it’s not just France. Europe is now home to 12,000 wolves, which is twice the wolf population of the U.S. in an area that’s half the size and more densely populated. This uptick also has incited outrage among pastoral farmers in Italy, where the mutilated bodies of illegally hunted wolves occasionally are displayed outside small towns.

Wildlife specialists estimate that there are about 360 wolves in France, which roam primarily in the Maritime Alps in packs of six to 15 individuals. Although that population may not sound like a lot, these master hunters are extremely efficient. A study published by the French Ministry of Ecology and Development of Sustainable Energy found that wolves killed 9,788 livestock (mostly sheep) in 2016, an increase of 853 over 2015, and a whopping 5,559 more kills than in 2010. Last year, 25 of France’s 96 departments reported wolf attacks.
By far the most affected region is the Maritime Alps, where 847 attacks took place between 2015 and 2016. “It is extremely difficult to see these animals killed and one’s hard work of several years destroyed by wolves,” says Phillippa Danaus, a local farmer. Though the French government allows 36 wolves to be killed each year, farmers argue that this number is too low and are calling for less government oversight in the face of soaring livestock deaths.
Quote:The wolf is a legally protected species … and there is no need to revisit that status.
Sylvie Cardona, Association for the Protection of Endangered Species
But animal rights groups are unsympathetic, claiming that farmers simply aren’t taking the necessary precautions to prevent attacks. “The wolf is a legally protected species … and there is no need to revisit that status,” says Sylvie Cardona, vice president of the Nièvre branch of the Association for the Protection of Endangered Species (AVES). “Breeders have difficulties because of an unfavorable economic context and not because of the wolf.” Cardona is referring to depressed prices in dairy, beef, pork and other animal products since 2014. “Their demands are totally out of place and outrageous.”
Europe has had a long and complex history with the Eurasian wolf. Ancient Vikings, Romans, Celts and Greeks all feared and respected the animal, writing it into their religious mythologies. The she-wolf, or Lupa Romana, the symbol of ancient Rome, was so revered that Romans only killed wolves when absolutely necessary.
All that changed in the Middle Ages. In France, wolf extermination was institutionalized by Charlemagne between 800 and 813 with the establishment of a special hunting corps called the louveterie, who were so efficient that the wolf had disappeared from France entirely by the 1940s. Other European state-sponsored programs, some of which lasted well into the 19th century, were equally efficient.

*This image is copyright of its original author

 
        
Three new additions to the growing European wolf population.
Source Barcroft Media/Getty
The French louveterie still exists, but as a wildlife and forestry service whose mission is preservation and population control. “The wolf is a beautiful animal,” says Joël Druyer, president of the Yvelines chapter of the louveterie. Taking a more evenhanded stance than his predecessors, Druyer admits that, as AVES claims, some farmers have gotten too used to a wolf-free France and do not take the necessary precautions, such as hiring a shepherd or buying guard dogs. Still, many farmers simply can’t keep up with the rapidly growing wolf population. “Some people take every precautionary measure and their herds still get attacked,” Druyer says.
One such farmer is Vidal Frédéric, a sheep farmer in the Maritime Alps, who lost three of his flock to wolves two days prior to speaking with OZY. Frédéric has an electric fence and eight guard dogs, and at times he sleeps in a house trailer next to the sheep enclosure; nevertheless, he still loses about 25 animals per year. “They’re adapting,” says Frédéric, noting that certain wolf packs have started attacking in the daytime when farmers think they are safe from the typically nocturnal hunters.
Whether you’re pro-wolf or pro-farmer, one thing is for sure: Wolves are repopulating the French landscape. “We will see wolves in the north of France in the years ahead,” says Druyer. “They’re coming.”
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United Kingdom SVTIGRIS Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-18-2017, 03:27 AM by SVTIGRIS )

FINALLY SOME PROGRESS



Wild lynx could soon roam the countryside for the first time in 1000 years

The Lynx UK Trust have applied to carry out a trial reintroduction of six Eurasian lynx in the Kielder Forest region of Northumberland.

*This image is copyright of its original author
The Lynx Trust are seeking permission to run a trial introducing 6 lynx back into the wild in the UK. (Image: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Wild lynx could soon roam the British countryside for the first time in 1000 years.
The Lynx UK Trust have applied to carry out a trial reintroduction of six Eurasian lynx in the Kielder Forest region of Northumberland.

And while any release would take place in England, they said the predators could cross the Border into Scotland.

Wild lynx could soon roam the British countryside for the first time in 1000 years.
The Lynx UK Trust have applied to carry out a trial reintroduction of six Eurasian lynx in the Kielder Forest region of Northumberland.

And while any release would take place in England, they said the predators could cross the Border into Scotland.


*This image is copyright of its original author

The predators could cross the Border into Scotland. (Image: Getty Images)
Scottish Natural Heritage are being kept informed after Environment Secretary Roseanna Cunningham pledged last year that no re-introductions would go ahead without full consultation.

Much of Scotland has huge potential for lynx habitat and farmers and crofters are said to have “serious concerns” about the trust’s proposals.
If Natural England give permission, four female lynx and two males will be set free in the Kielder Forest area for a five-year period, wearing satellite collars to monitor their movements.
The information would be used to decide whether full reintroduction can go ahead with more individuals across a wider area.
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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