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Ocean

India sanjay Offline
Wildanimal Enthusiast
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#46

Beautiful image of Humpback whales
Humback whales in the ocean
*This image is copyright of its original author


Humback whales swimming in ocean
*This image is copyright of its original author
"There is pleasure in the pathless woods, there is rapture in the lonely shore, there is society where none intrudes, by the deep sea, and music in its roar; I love not Man the less, but Nature more" --Lord Byron
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India parvez Offline
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#47
( This post was last modified: 11-25-2016, 09:47 PM by parvez )

Disturbing but interesting,
[video=youtube]http://http://roaring.earth/fishermen-become-millionaires-after-finding-176-pounds-of-whale-vomit/[/video]
Three men have hit the jackpot after finding 176 pounds of floating whale vomit worth an estimated $2.8 million.
According to a report in Times of Oman, the fishermen discovered one giant chunk off the coast of Qurayat in the northeastern part of Oman.
One of the men said in the report, “We used a rope to collect it and carry it inside the boat. I was told earlier that ambergris has an icky smell, but after a couple of days it imparts a pleasant scent. We rushed back to the beach with joy and happiness.”
While you might not consider a marine animal’s waste to be valuable, this particular waxy substance called “ambergris” is a heavily sought after component of perfumes
Most perfumers have switched to using synthetic ambroxan instead of whale vomit due to concerns with animal welfare (the use encourages hunting), but some countries still trade  it legally. The substance acts as a fixative, allowing the scent to last longer on your skin.

Ambergris is formed in the stomachs of sperm whales. Scientists theorize that because the sperm whale diet consists mainly of giant squids with sharp, pointy beaks, ambergris coats the digestive system to form a protective layer.

The waxy substance is generally found in lumps of random shapes and sizes, and generally ranges in weight from 15 to 100 grams. Initially, it has an unpleasant fishy odor; as it ages, it develops a sweet, musky scent.
These fishermen are surely thanking the whale that provided them with such an unexpected fortune. “I’ll wait to see how this sale will go and later I’ll think of changing my career and enter the real-estate sector to live a better life,” one of the crew members said.

*This image is copyright of its original author

[video=youtube]http://https://youtu.be/1DbIzfYUmwk[/video]
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United States Pckts Offline
Bigcat Enthusiast
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#48

Killer whale defeats sevengill shark in battle for ocean supremacy


*This image is copyright of its original author

MONTEREY, Calif., Dec. 14 (UPI) -- A drone photographer on a California whale watching tour captured footage of the aftermath of one of the ocean's great rivalries -- killer whales vs. sharks.
The photographer was on a tour Tuesday with Monterey Bay Whale Watch when the drone was dispatched to capture footage of a nearby pod of killer whales.
The drone operator reviewed the footage and discovered one of the killer whales was holding the carcass of another predator -- a sevengill shark.
"These whales are typically smaller in size than the Bigg's or transient killer whale type and they had several very young calves with them! Great encounter!" Monterey Bay Whale Watch said on its Facebook page.

http://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2016/12/14/K...481733972/
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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United States Polar Offline
Student at Virginia Tech
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Moderators
#49

Imagine being ambushed by one of these in our modern oceans:




"Polar bears are the world's largest extant mammalian predator. Despite their size, they are capable of feats none can compare to, including but not limited to: dragging a three-ton walrus with only its jaws."

- Polar, January 2017
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India Rishi Online
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#50

(01-16-2017, 05:09 AM)Polar Wrote: Imagine being ambushed by one of these in our modern oceans:





Aesome & realistic animation & movements!!!..
In the wild, expect the unexpected, as we humans haven't really much clue of what to expect.
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#51

@Polar :

About #49: "Walking with dinosaurs" 2th episode "Cruel sea"...
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Netherlands peter Offline
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Moderators
#52
( This post was last modified: 05-12-2017, 08:59 AM by peter )

HUMANS AND SHARKS

Humans hunt sharks. To such a degree, that many species are threatened. Occasionally, sharks hunt humans. This post has a few pictures of near misses and a very fit man who survived an attack in Australia.

We'll start with the navy diver who was attacked by a bull shark in Sydney Harbour:


*This image is copyright of its original author


Near miss 1 - South Africa:


*This image is copyright of its original author


Near miss 2 - Australia:


*This image is copyright of its original author


Near-miss 3 - Australia (not sure):


*This image is copyright of its original author


No words needed, I guess:


*This image is copyright of its original author


Did sharks develop an appetite for humans in recent years? Not likely. But ever more humans visit the sea and ignore the risks. Although those in the know maintain that the chance to get targeted is close to zero, things change when you decide for a bit of recreation in the sea in a region where large sharks are common.
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United States Polar Offline
Student at Virginia Tech
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Moderators
#53

Although it is still possible (like the man and bear relationships) that sharks might have an affinity for revenge towards humans, since humans are killing sharks as a tremendous level and sharks are starting to plot a mega-revenge of sorts.
"Polar bears are the world's largest extant mammalian predator. Despite their size, they are capable of feats none can compare to, including but not limited to: dragging a three-ton walrus with only its jaws."

- Polar, January 2017
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